Undergraduate Courses

Please explore this page for information about History and History of Science course offerings. Cross-listed courses offered by other departments can also be found below, with the department to contact noted beneath each course title. If you are having problems enrolling in a course, please start by contacting the Enrollment Help Desk. For questions about enrollment permissions, wait lists, etc. please reach out to undergraduateprogram@history.wisc.edu. History Majors and graduating seniors have first priority on the wait lists for our courses.


Spring 2024

History and History of Science Courses

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History 101: American History to the Civil War Era, the Origin & Growth of the U.S.

Instructor: Maggie Flamingo

 TR 11:00am-12:15pm

Description: American political, economic, and social development from the founding of the colonies to the Civil War.

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History 102: American History, Civil War Era to the Present

Instructor: James McKay

MWF 12:05-12:55pm

Description: History is about stories. We make sense of history through the framework of stories. What stories we choose to tell about ourselves, our families, our communities, our country, and ultimately the world matter. They matter because what we believe about the past and its stories guide us as we make choices now and in the future. Without understanding history, and especially the stories we tell ourselves from it, we cannot understand ourselves or others.

In this class we will explore the richness and messiness of American (and world) history since the Civil War. We will look closely at the stories people have told themselves, and the consequences of those narratives. Understanding those narratives, and how they differ over time and from different perspectives, will help us as we try and make sense of the world we have inherited and our place in it. Together we will see how stories about the past (and our past) matter, and hopefully gain an appreciation for history and our fundamental role in understanding and interpreting it.

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History 108: Introduction to East Asian History - Korea

Instructor: Charles Kim

T 1:00-2:15pm ONLINE

Description: Survey of major cultural, social, political, and intellectual developments in Korea from the 10th century to the 21st century.

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

 

History 119: Europe and the World, 1400-1815

Instructor: Michael Martoccio

MW 4:00-5:15pm

Description: This course introduces majors and non-majors to the history of Europe from 1400-1815, also known as the Early Modern Age. Students will explore a number of historical changes including the rediscovery of Greco-Roman culture in the Renaissance, the transformation of Christianity and Judaism during the Protestant Reformation, the centralization of state power through new forms of absolutist ideology, the invention of novel forms of scientific and philosophical inquiry during the Scientific Revolution and Enlightenment, and the destruction of monarchical power and privilege during the French Revolution.

Although centered on the history of Europe, this course explicitly frames these events within a global context. The Early Modern Age was the historical moment when Europeans came into intensive contact with non-European peoples. Humanists and artists, influenced by the Italian Renaissance, propagated new forms of textual translation and Latinate education across the globe through domestication and hybridity. Christian communities of all types spread their faith to non-Christian peoples. European travelers wove proto-anthropological tales of foreign lands. Colonial administrators imposed new forms of empire while Europeans’ insatiable demand for commodities led to the creation of plantation slavery. And novel political ideas about popular sovereignty, religious toleration, and universal rights propelled colonized people towards (albeit limited) forms of liberation.

Through its structure, readings, and assignments, this course pays special attention to the expansion of Europeans into the Mediterranean, the Americas, Africa, and Asia, exploring how the global exchange of goods, peoples, ideologies, and cultures altered both non-European and European societies.

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

 

History 120: Europe and the Modern World, 1815 to the Present

Instructor: Laird Boswell

MW 2:30-3:45pm

Description: This course introduces students to key themes in the social, political, and cultural history of Europe from the fall of Napoleon to the twenty first century. We will ask how and why Europe came to dominate the world in the nineteenth century and why it lost that dominance in the twentieth. Why did Europe give birth both to models of democracy and social equality but also to colonialism, dictatorship and terror? Why has Europe been such a laboratory for nationalism and does the emergence of the European Union signal the end of this epoch? These are some of the many questions that we will address over the course of the semester. 

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History 124: British History: 1688 to the Present

Instructor: Daniel Ussishkin

TR 4:00-5:15pm

Description: The course introduces students to the major themes in the history of modern imperial Britain and to some of the ways historians have tried to make sense of it all. Such themes include (but not limited to) the changing patterns of life during those centuries, the development of modern identities and notions of the self, the emergence of a modern, commercial civil society, the rise of industrial capitalism, liberalism, the modern state, and imperial and total war. We will pay particular attention to gender in terms of both “lived experience” and representations of power (and its critique), and to the transnational nature of modern British history, largely, but not only, through the history of the economic, political, and cultural foundations of the modern British empire.

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History 130: An Introduction to World History

Instructor: Paul Grant

MWF 11:00-11:50am

Description: Introduction to major themes in world history. Such themes might include: empire and imperialism, environmental impacts, global trade and globalization, war, migration, gender, race, religion, nationalism, class, and the like.

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History of Science 133: Biology and Society, 1950-Today

Instructor: Nicole Nelson

MW 11:00-11:50am 

Description: From medical advancements to environmental crises and global food shortages, the life sciences are implicated in some of the most pressing social issues of our time. This course explores events in the history of biology from the mid-twentieth century to today, and examines how developments in this science have shaped and are shaped by society. In the first unit, we investigate the origins of the institutions, technologies, and styles of practice that characterize contemporary biology, such as the use of mice as “model organisms” for understanding human diseases. The second unit examines biological controversies such as the introduction of genetically modified plants into the food supply. The final unit asks how biological facts and theories have been and continue to be used as a source for understanding ourselves.

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History 152: The U.S. West Since 1850

Instructor: Allison Powers Useche

MW 2:30-3:45pm

Description: This course explores the history of places that have been called the American West since 1850. We start with incorporation, as the U.S. surveyed a West that had become American in name and tried to make it American in fact, a process that westerners resisted as often as they welcomed it. By the late 19th century, the West was an identifiable region with characteristic economic features, race relations, and federal ties, and it held a unique place in collective memory. In the 20th century, western distinctiveness faded in some ways and persisted in others, and western variants unfolded of the world wars, Depression, Cold War, and Vietnam War; civil rights; suburbanization and the New Right; environmentalism; immigration; and globalization. We employ economic, environmental, political, cultural, and social analyses, and attend to the dreams of many westerners: people of North American, Latin American, European, African, and Asian descent, and of all genders, classes, and sexualities.

HISTORY/CHICLA 152 is open to students at all levels, and first-year students are encouraged to request enrollment permission that will override the sophomore standing requisite. Please request permission to enroll by completing this form: https://go.wisc.edu/rzqjh2. Staff from the History Department and Chican@ & Latin@ Studies will be monitoring enrollment, and will enter permissions for first-year students based on seat availability at the enrollment appointment time. If you have any questions, please reach out to undergraduateprogram@history.wisc.edu and chicla@lestci.wisc.edu.

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History 160: Asian American History: Movement and Dislocation

Instructor: Cindy I-Fen Cheng

MW 2:30-3:45pm

Description: Examines the impact of colonialism, war, and capitalism on the movement of Asians to the U.S. Considers how racial, gendered, class, sexual, and national formations within the U.S. structured Asian immigration to North America.

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History 190: Introduction to American Indian History

Instructor: Matt Villeneuve 

MW 11:00-11:50am

Description: A broad survey of American Indian history which centers Indigenous peoples, communities, and nations in the context of U.S. policy and culture that emphasizes decolonial methods and Native ways of knowing the past.

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History 200-001: Carnage in Rome

Instructor: Marc Kleijwegt

M 8:50-10:45am

Description: Introduction to historical studies at the research university. Emphasis on interpretation and critical thinking.

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History 200-002: Revolution, Democracy, and War: Athens, 403 BCE

Instructor: Claire Taylor

 M 1:20-3:15pm

Description: This course centers on the final years of the fifth century BCE in Athens. This was a time of great change in Athenian political life: after almost 30 years of fighting the Peloponnesian War, they were defeated and the city almost destroyed. An oligarchic revolution overthrew the established democratic system, before itself being overthrown and democracy re-established. How did the Athenians get to this point? How did they understand these turbulent times? What were the threats to democracy, where did they come from, and how were they resolved? What was Athenian society like at this time?

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History 201-001: Digital History and the American City

Instructor: Paige Glotzer

W 3:30-5:25pm

Description: Urban historians use digital tools to understand how the past shapes the places around them. In this course, students will gain hands-on experience with these technologies while learning about the central roles cities, large and small, have played in American politics, society, and culture. We will handle primary sources, learn to interpret data, and “read the built environment itself. Using these skills, among others, students will complete a digital urban history project based on original research over the course of the semester and present it to their classmates. No coding knowledge is required.

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History 201-003: Wisconsin History & Material Culture

Instructor: John Hall

W 1:20-3:15pm

Description: Like all sections of “The Historian’s Craft, this course will introduce you to the essential skills of a historian: defining important historical questions, collecting and analyzing evidence, presenting original conclusions, and contributing to ongoing scholarly discussions. Essential to the discipline of history, these skills are no less useful in other intellectual and professional endeavors. Fundamentally, this course is designed to make you a critical thinker, capable of processing and contextualizing complex information, synthesizing new knowledge, and communicating effectively in writing and other media. It will also introduce you to the study of material culture, allowing you to read historical artifacts as you would documents to uncover the “patterns of mind of those who fabricated and used these persistent manifestations of the past.

Unlike other sections of “The Historian’s Craft, which typically culminate in a proposal for future research, “Wisconsin History & Material Culture will require you to identify, analyze, and research an artifact of Wisconsin history and to present your findings in three media: a ten-page research paper, a twelve-minute oral presentation, and 2,000 words of web content regarding the artifact. Each student will examine one Wisconsin artifact in detail and unpack its meaning and importance to the history of the state. Exceptional projects will potentially contribute to Wisconsin 101: Our History in Objects, a statewide, collaborative public history project featuring a web site and broadcasts on Wisconsin Public Radio’s Wisconsin Life.

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History 201-004: Women in U.S./North American History

Instructor: April Haynes

MW 2:30-3:45pm

Description: Have you ever taken a history course and wondered about all the women in the background? What if women were at the center of the story? What about diverse women, not just Abigail Adams and Eleanor Roosevelt? What were BIPOC, queer and trans women doing? This course offers students the opportunity to follow their curiosity about women, gender, sexuality, and feminisms in US history. It will teach you where to look to find answers to your own questions — how to navigate the relevant databases, why researchers sometimes browse the physical stacks of campus libraries, what to do with rare manuscripts in the Wisconsin Historical Society, and whether oral history interviews might be the right approach for you. As a Comm-B course, it will also demonstrate how to communicate your research findings to various audiences.

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

 

History 201-005: History of the Suburb in America

Instructor: Erin Faigin

TR 9:30-10:45am

Description: Conduct original historical research and convey the results to others. Through engagement with archival materials, become historical detectives; practice defining important historical questions, collecting and analyzing evidence, presenting original conclusions, and contributing to ongoing discussions. Confer individually with and receive feedback from instructors to improve skills of historical analysis and communication in both written and spoken formats.

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History 201-006: How do Empires End?

Instructor: Louise Young

TR 9:30-10:45am 

Description: Conduct original historical research and convey the results to others. Through engagement with archival materials, become historical detectives; practice defining important historical questions, collecting and analyzing evidence, presenting original conclusions, and contributing to ongoing discussions. Confer individually with and receive feedback from instructors to improve skills of historical analysis and communication in both written and spoken formats.

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History 201-007: Global History of Unfree Labor in the Long 19th Century

Instructor: Geoffrey Durham

T 3:30-5:25pm

Description: People have been enslaved, enserfed, and otherwise compelled to work all over the world for millennia. The long nineteenth century roughly the period from the revolutions in the Americas in the late eighteenth century to the First World War in the first quarter of the twentieth was a major inflection point in this long history of unfree labor. But why, exactly? In a word, unfree labor became a problem for moral, economic, and other reasons. For some, it was unjust and inhumane. For others, it was simply inefficient. Movements for emancipation from unfree labor regimes coincided with efforts to discipline labor in new ways. In this course we will interrogate the many types of unfree labor and their transformations through a series of case studies. We will analyze the larger structures of unfree labor as well as individual experiences of working within them. We will consider these dynamics in different parts of the world and at different sites of work, including farms and plantations, factories, prisons, battlefields, and homes. By engaging with primary sources and secondary literature and developing the research and communication skills that historians use to analyze the past, you will have the opportunity to craft your own project that asks and answers an original question about unfree labor.

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History 201-008: Global Christianities

Instructor: Paul Grant

M 1:20-3:15pm

Description: This course is about how Christianity became a religion of the Global South (by midcentury half of all Christians will live in Africa), including an overview of how a cross-cultural process has also fundamentally remade the religion.

Global Christianity is a geopolitical reality, but so much more — it is also a colorful mosaic of cultural creativity, a foundation for encountering the world, and more. It is both good and bad: some have used it to justify violence, while others have used it for resistance.

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History 201-009: Mass Migrations and Refugees in World History

Instructor: Paul Grant

W 8:50-10:45am

Description: Learn about mass migration at its broadest level, and dig into a focused research project on your own. The first half of this semester will consist of common readings on migration throughout the millennia from hunters and gatherers down to climate refugees of today. In the second half of the course, you will embark on a guided individual research paper on a topic of your own interest anything from ancient Persia to contemporary Africa.

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History 201-010: 1945 in Europe: Year Zero?

Instructor: Emma Kuby

T 1:20-3:15pm

Description: This “Historian’s Craft” class invites students to learn how historians work by focusing tightly on one dramatic place and time: Europe in 1945. Some historians have adopted the term “Year Zero” to describe just how shattered the European continent was as World War II drew to a close; others find such language misleading, since many continuities nevertheless marked the transition from wartime to postwar. But all agree that monumental tasks of repatriation, reconstruction, restitution, and reconciliation now confronted Europe’s peoples, many millions of whom were displaced or homeless. Meanwhile, revolutionary social and political forces were sweeping through the continent as well — and, in many places, violence was ongoing.

To explore how historians approach questions about continuity and change in the aftermath of human-wrought catastrophes, this course considers subjects such as survivors’ journeys out of Hitler’s concentration camps; the American, Soviet, British, and French occupation of Germany; international humanitarian efforts to help refugee children; retribution and justice proceedings against Nazi collaborators; the response of European colonial subjects to the continent’s devastation; early efforts to memorialize the Holocaust; new visions of democratic government from Italy to Czechoslovakia; mass population transfers; the early stirrings of the Cold War; and sexual relationships between US Army soldiers and European women and men.

We tackle these topics via a diverse array of written, visual, and audiovisual sources produced on the ground in Europe in 1945. We also consider recent works by scholars with novel approaches to the messy, highly transnational history of this landmark year. Throughout, we emphasize the choices that confronted ordinary people. Along the way, students will develop the skills to design and carry out their own original research projects on Europe in “Year Zero.”

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History 201-011: Global History of Human Rights, 20th C. to Present

Instructor: Paige Pendarvis

 R 8:50-10:45am

Description: What are human rights? Who is responsible for defending them? What projects and positions have revolutionaries, activists, international organizations, and governments justified in their name? Today, human rights are invoked by grassroots social movements, NGOs, national governments, and international institutions to demand individual rights, claim legitimacy for their actions and existence, and justify international intervention in sovereign states. But human rights have not always held such a privileged place in our contemporary world or meant what they do today. This class will investigate why and how human rights rose to such prominence over the course of the 20th century. We will also examine how historians have accounted for the rise of human rights and make our own contributions to these exciting scholarly debates. We will focus on the second half of the 20th century where we will explore how human rights came to structure international institutions like the United Nations and NGOs like Amnesty International and the historical events and processes that shaped their evolution. We will explore these questions through a number of case studies from around the world and across borders. These include: the Armenian Genocide, forced population transfers in Southern Europe, the creation of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, anticolonial demands for self-determination in Africa and Asia, socialist conceptions of human rights in Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union, transnational movements protesting human rights abuses in Chile, human rights and cultural relativism, and many more. We will read secondary sources written by historians, political scientists, sociologists, and philosophers alongside a variety of primary sources, ranging from government reports, newspapers, memoirs, legal documents, films, photographs, and more.

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History 201-012: World War I Wisconsin: Searching the Archives

Instructor: Leslie Bellais

M 11:00am-12:55pm

Description: Conduct original historical research and convey the results to others. Through engagement with archival materials, become historical detectives; practice defining important historical questions, collecting and analyzing evidence, presenting original conclusions, and contributing to ongoing discussions. Confer individually with and receive feedback from instructors to improve skills of historical analysis and communication in both written and spoken formats.

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History 201-013: Race & Place in the Migrant Midwest

Instructor: Dustin Cohan

W 1:20-3:15pm

Description: The geographic space known as the US Midwest is large, diverse, and difficult to define. Often referred to as the “Heartland or “Middle America, the region’s namesake is a cultural construct that is as much a political device as a way for people to identify and orient themselves to a place. Largely, though, the Midwest has been cast as a white space dominated by pastoral landscapes and working-class cities, and isolated from the more globalized coastal regions. Whether envisioned as the Rust Belt or the Corn Belt, the myth of the white Midwest continues to overshadow a complex history of race, place, and migration that have shaped the region.

This course explores how migrants and immigrants from various backgrounds experienced the Midwest from the late eighteenth century to the present. Centering discussions of violence, race, community building, and culture, this class situates the region in a broader history of US immigration. We will begin with settler colonialism and explore immigration’s role in indigenous dispossession and removal. Then, the course traces waves of immigration from Europe, the US South, Latin America, the Caribbean, and Southeast Asia. We will examine movement and settlement patterns, racial formations, interethnic relations, as well as issues that connect US foreign policy, globalization, and labor. Organized chronologically around periods in immigration history, the class investigates how immigrants made place and community in the Midwest.

We will structure our discussions around several important questions: What role did race play in the development of the region? What is placemaking and how did it operate in the history of the Midwest? How did migration and immigration affect regional identities and how have those populations transformed the region? Is there a particular way of life that migrants, immigrants, and refugees have made in the Midwest, one that is distinct from how people have lived in other parts of the country? This course challenges students to consider these queries as they participate in discussions on Midwest immigration history.

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History 201-014: Race & Place in the Migrant Midwest

Instructor: Dustin Cohan

T 11:00am-12:55pm

Description: The geographic space known as the US Midwest is large, diverse, and difficult to define. Often referred to as the “Heartland or “Middle America, the region’s namesake is a cultural construct that is as much a political device as a way for people to identify and orient themselves to a place. Largely, though, the Midwest has been cast as a white space dominated by pastoral landscapes and working-class cities, and isolated from the more globalized coastal regions. Whether envisioned as the Rust Belt or the Corn Belt, the myth of the white Midwest continues to overshadow a complex history of race, place, and migration that have shaped the region.

This course explores how migrants and immigrants from various backgrounds experienced the Midwest from the late eighteenth century to the present. Centering discussions of violence, race, community building, and culture, this class situates the region in a broader history of US immigration. We will begin with settler colonialism and explore immigration’s role in indigenous dispossession and removal. Then, the course traces waves of immigration from Europe, the US South, Latin America, the Caribbean, and Southeast Asia. We will examine movement and settlement patterns, racial formations, interethnic relations, as well as issues that connect US foreign policy, globalization, and labor. Organized chronologically around periods in immigration history, the class investigates how immigrants made place and community in the Midwest.

We will structure our discussions around several important questions: What role did race play in the development of the region? What is placemaking and how did it operate in the history of the Midwest? How did migration and immigration affect regional identities and how have those populations transformed the region? Is there a particular way of life that migrants, immigrants, and refugees have made in the Midwest, one that is distinct from how people have lived in other parts of the country? This course challenges students to consider these queries as they participate in discussions on Midwest immigration history.

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History 201-015: July 1914

Instructor: David McDonald

T 1:20-3:15pm

Description: Conduct original historical research and convey the results to others. Through engagement with archival materials, become historical detectives; practice defining important historical questions, collecting and analyzing evidence, presenting original conclusions, and contributing to ongoing discussions. Confer individually with and receive feedback from instructors to improve skills of historical analysis and communication in both written and spoken formats.

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History of Science 202: The Making of Modern Science

Instructor: Devin Kennedy

TR 9:55-10:45am

Description: This course provides an introduction to major developments in the history of science from the mid-seventeenth century until the beginning of the 21st that have brought about a dramatic change in the way the world is known. We explore when and under what conditions a specific human enterprise called ‘science’ came to be, and how it has changed. What historical factors form and shape it, and which continue to do so? How did science come to be a powerful agent in modern life, and what role did particular visions of science play in defining what we take the ‘modern’ to be in the first place?

In endeavoring to understand the history of science, we will learn about the connections between commerce, manufacture, exploration, and war, changing conceptions of people’s place in nature, and our ability to control the world around us. In the process, we will come to a new understanding of the relationship between science, technology and society.

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History of Science 211-001: The History of Disaster

Instructor: Daniel Williford

T 1:20-3:15pm

Description: In recent years, popular and academic writing about the causes and consequences of “natural disasters has undergone a paradigm shift. Wildfires in California and Australia, hurricanes along the Gulf Coast, drought in the Syrian countryside once presumed to be isolated, catastrophic events are now inevitably linked to questions of climate change and global environmental crisis. Similarly, world-altering pandemics previously imagined as a relic of the past have revealed the tightly wound connections between contemporary economic, political, and technological systems and the microscopic world of viruses and microorganisms. In this contemporary moment, it remains essential to investigate the historical contexts in which disasters occur and the social, political, and cultural dynamics that they reshape. This course takes a case-study approach to the history of disaster, drawing on examples from multiple regions across the 19th and 20th centuries. We will examine both scientific and artistic representations of disasters in film, literature, and visual art.

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History of Science 211-002: Imagining & Mapping the Medieval World

Instructor: Nicholas Jacobson

M 1:20-3:15pm

Description: This course examines the history of pre-modern science through art, images, and diagrams as it developed from the time of the fall of Rome (ca. 476 CE) until an era of intense material and intellectual change in Western Europe known as the Scientific Revolution (ca. 1540 — 1640).

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History 212: The History of Western Christianity to 1750

Instructor: Lee Wandel 

TR 8:00-9:15am

Description: A survey of Christianity from being a small, persecuted sect in the Roman Empire to becoming the dominant religion of western Europe, penetrating into the lives of Europeans, fissuring into multiple churches, and spreading across the globe. Attention is given to doctrine, ritual, worship, architecture, images, and music.

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History of Science 212: Bodies, Diseases, and Healers: An Introduction to the History of Medicine

Instructor: Nicholas Jacobson

MW 9:55-10:45am

Description: A survey of different conceptions of how the body as a site of sickness has been understood from Antiquity to contemporary medicine. Includes consideration of the origins and evolution of public health, the changing social role of healers, and the emergence of the modern “standardized” body in health and illness.

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History 221-001: African Americans and Sports

Instructor: Ashley Brown

TR 4:00-5:15pm

Description: This course explores the struggles and political symbolism of African American athletes in times of social upheaval and examines African Americans’ access to and participation in sports, recreation, and leisure activities from the 1890s through the present. We will interrogate how Black sports figures have used their skills, barrier-breaking presences, and celebrity to engage in campaigns for racial uplift, defy class conventions, promote the expansion of citizenship and civil rights, and challenge expectations of normative gender performance and sexuality within and beyond the playing arena. We will study the experiences and perspectives of those who have resisted political engagement, too. We will see how activists, journalists, and government officials have coopted the images and abilities of Black sportswomen and sportsmen to facilitate their own gains. Overall, we will trace how African American athletes have carried the aspirations and anxieties of the nation on their shoulders.

This course is ideal for students who are genuinely interested in U.S. history in all its complexities. This course is not about sports as a source of diversion and fanciful entertainment. We are, to borrow from and amend the title of a recent book, learning African American history through sports. Sports and recreation are fun. They are also serious business. We will take this three-pronged approach to our lecture course and our discussion sections.

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History 223-001: Europe’s Urban Age, 1900-Today: Ideology & Protest

Instructor: Collin Bernard

MWF 12:05-12:55pm 

Description: In History 223 (001), we are exploring how over the 20th century most Europeans started to live in cities. We will be asking together what the meaning of this change is for understanding Europe’s past and future. To answer this question we are studying topics like urban planning and architecture, social movements and political conflict, the major ideologies of the 20th century like Socialism, Communism, and Fascism, and what daily life was like on the streets of Europe’s great towns and cities. By examining not only what happened in history but also where it happened, this class will help you understand how the built world around you takes shape and how big historical changes are felt at street level.

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History 223-002: Women, Spirituality, Law and Medicine, 1100-1500

Instructor: Sara Paris

TR 9:30-10:45am 

Description: Topics vary reflecting the interests, expertise, and innovating intention of the instructor.

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History 229-001: Mideast Nationalism, Violence, and Migration

Instructor: Daniel Stolz

TR 11:00am-12:15pm

Description: Explores topics that involve at least two continents. Topics vary reflecting the interests, expertise, and innovating intention of the instructor.

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History 229-002: Empires in Eurasia, from Chinggis Khan to Stalin

Instructor: Geoffrey Durham

MW 2:30-3:45pm

Description: The Eurasian landmass has been the site of the world’s largest empires led by some of history’s most infamous figures, from Chinggis (Genghis) Khan in the thirteenth century to Stalin in the twentieth. The gargantuan size of these polities and the staggering ethno-linguistic, racial, religious, political, and ecological diversity that they encompassed provokes a number of questions: What held them together? What were the sources of their power? How did they relate to other parts of the globe? And, lastly, how did they shape the modern world? In this course, we will examine the rise and fall of the Mongol, Ottoman, Chinese, and Russian-Soviet empires as well as other regional powers. We will focus on themes of settler colonialism, enslavement, science, revolution, capitalism/anticapitalism, and geopolitics.

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History 246: Southeast Asian Refugees of the “Cold” War

Instructor: Michael Cullinane

TR 9:30-10:45am

Description: In-depth study of the peoples, conflicts, and wars in Cambodia, Laos, and Vietnam, with emphasis on the Cold War era (1945-1990) and on the resulting migration and resettlement of over one million Hmong, Khmer, Lao, and Vietnamese in the United States.

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History 255: Introduction to East Asian Civilizations

Instructor: Viren Murthy

MW 2:30-3:45pm

Description: Multidisciplinary and historical perspectives on the East Asian civilizations of China, Japan, Korea, Tibet and Mongolia from prehistory to the present, including developments in philosophy, economy, governance, social structure, kinship, geography, etc.

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History 269: War, Race, and Religion in Europe and the United States, from the Scramble for Africa to Today

Instructor: Giuliana Chamedes

TR 11:00am-12:15pm

Description: Investigates the complex history of European and American violence and war-making through the lens of race and religion. Taking a comparative approach, analyzes several major conflicts of the twentieth century, from World War I to the wars of decolonization, and from the genocide of the Herero peoples to the Armenian Genocide, the Holocaust, and beyond. Key topics include the genealogy of the modern idea of “race” in Europe and the U.S.; the drive towards a world of more homogeneous nation-states after World War I; and the emergence of transnational protest movements opposed to racism, imperialism, antisemitism, and Islamophobia. Drawing on a range of texts, songs, and films, investigates new connections between Europe and the United States. Take an international look at concepts like race and nation, and try to make sense of extreme violence, war-making, and the pre-requisites of peace. 

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History 283-001: Intermediate Honors Seminar-The British Empire and Its Histories

Instructor: Daniel Ussishkin

W 3:30-5:25pm

Description: In this seminar, students are invited to engage the history of the British empire since about 1780 and think more broadly and histories of empires and imperialisms. The seminar is organized thematically and chronologically, and engages question such as empire and the “civilizing mission, empire and global economic transformations, imperial cultures, imperial violence, bodies, race, and gender; the British empire and the built environment; imperialism and humanitarianism; decolonization; and remembering (or forgetting) empire. We will pay particular attention to the ways in which studying the history of the British empire, which by 1921 covered a quarter of the globe, helps us to make sense of our world today.

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History 300: History at Work & History 301: History Internship Seminar

Instructor: Gloria Whiting

W 12:05-1:50pm

Description: What can I do with a History degree? How can a History degree help me get a good job and develop a career that I love? How can I talk about my History degree so that prospective employers can understand its value and workplace relevance? How can I make the best of the opportunities I have — and create new opportunities for myself, too? Why do employers love History majors?

This course will help you answer questions like these as you consider your future career options. You’ll hear from successful professionals about how they got to where they are, how History has helped them, and how you can build a successful career for yourself, too. You’ll craft a resume and cover letter, and practice simple but crucial skills for interviewing, networking, and your first year in a new job. And, for those taking the 2-credit option (with discussion section), the course will walk you through the process of researching possible career options, networking, and conducting informational interviews. In other words, this course offers you structure, advice, and insights from successful history alumni as you begin or continue your career exploration and planning.

For more information, visit the History 300 & 301 webpage.

History 302: History of American Thought, 1859 to the Present

Instructor: Jennifer Ratner-Rosenhagen

MW 2:30-3:45pm

Description: Designed for those who are interested in the role of ideas and culture in modern American history. Examine developments in philosophy, science, political theory, social criticism, and the arts in American life from 1859 to the present. Read the works of a number of influential thinkers and writers, as well as explore a variety of intellectual movements, which shaped the cultural worlds of late 19th- and 20th-century Americans. Themes include: the influence of Darwinism on religion; the impact of industrialization on ideas about American society; the revolt against formalism in philosophy, literature, and the social sciences; early twentieth-century conceptions of race, ethnicity, and gender; the responsibility of the intellectual in times of national and global crisis; post-WWII liberalism and existentialism; the rise of postmodernism in the academy and American popular culture, and the persistent contestations over the meaning and scope of American national identity. 

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History 307: A History of Rome

Instructor: Marc Kleijwegt

TR 11:00am-12:15pm

Description: Roman civilization from the monarchy through the collapse of the Roman Empire in the west.

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History 308: Introduction to Buddhism

Instructor: Tyler Lehrer 

MW 4:00-5:15pm 

Description: This course introduces and surveys the historical development of Buddhism across Asia and beyond, beginning in what is now India at the time of the Buddha, all the way to the 1960s in the U.S. and Southeast Asia during the Vietnam War, and into the present day. Our starting point will be the central Buddhist ritual of taking refuge in the “Triple Gem”: the Buddha, his teachings known as the Dharma, and the Sangha, communities and individuals who call themselves Buddhist. We will examine and discuss interpretations of the Triple Gem through a variety of sources and experiential learning activities such as the Buddha’s teachings, stories about influential nuns and monks, Zen poetry, Buddhist art in the Chazen Museum, and guest speakers and meditation teachers. There is no expectation that you have previously studied or encountered Buddhism or other Asian religious traditions.

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History 309: The Crusades: Christianity and Islam

Instructor: Elizabeth Lapina

MW 8:00-9:15am

Description: An examination of the Crusades from both Christian and Islamic perspectives; the historical, social, and religious context and significance of the Crusades for both Christians and Muslims.

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History of Science 323: The Scientific Revolution, From Copernicus to Newton

Instructor: Florence Hsia & Robin Rider

T 12:05-12:55pm

Description: This course explores renaissance and revolution in European science, beginning in 1543 with the heliocentric astronomy of Nicolaus Copernicus and ending with Isaac Newton’s death in 1727. It pays particular attention to issues of tradition and novelty in natural knowledge, institutional settings for scientific activity, the multifaceted relationship between science and religion, as well as manuscript traditions and the transition to print.

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History 329: History of American Capitalism

Instructor: Paige Glotzer

TR 1:00-2:15pm

Description: For many, capitalism and the United States are inseparable. However, capitalism is not a static, natural, or universal. Rather, History 329 examines capitalism as both historically specific theories and actions that heavily shaped U.S. over time. Students will grapple with questions such as how and why can capitalism change? How has capitalism served to justify political and economic activity? How have people from different backgrounds articulated and experienced capitalism’s promises and pitfalls? And how has capitalism shaped relationships between the United States and the world? Though there are no easy answers, the history of capitalism will enrich understandings of American society, politics, and culture. 

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History 337: Social and Intellectual History of China, 589 AD-1919

Instructor: Joseph Dennis

TR 11:00am-12:15pm 

Description: This is an upper division course on Chinese history during middle and later imperial China, arranged by topic. Topics addressed include environment; government and law; economy; maritime China; intellectual life, family, marriage, and sex; science, technology, and medicine. The class will be a mixture of discussions of assigned readings,and lectures and analysis of primary sources. Reading assignments are usually one book chapter or article per class, although this varies. The single most important thing in this class is to keep up on the reading. Course requirements include coming to class prepared for discussion, participating in discussion, taking short multiple-choice quizzes that are designed to be very easy if you did the reading, writing summaries and analyses of two course books, a comparison of parts of two books, several short assignments at the museum and library, and a final paper of 2100-2500 words. There are no exams.

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History 345: Military History of the United States

Instructor: John Hall

MW 9:55-10:45am

Description: This course surveys the American military experience from the colonial era to the present day. It takes a broad view of military history, examining the influence of warfare on all aspects of American society. We will not omit the traditional mainstays of the field the study of battles, leaders, and the development of military technology or domains of military operations, but we will consider them within the broader American experience and in an international context. Ultimately, this course will provide an understanding of how American military organizations and practices have evolved over time, as well as an appreciation of how war has shaped America and, in many regards, defined its interaction with the world.

 For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History of Science 350: Mobile Minerals: Environmental History of Smart Phones

Instructor: Samm Newton

MWF 8:50-9:40am

Description: Gold may be great for cell phones because it is chemically stable and conducts electricity, but it also has an enduring legacy in human history. China and South Africa are currently two of the largest exporters of gold, but gold also fueled European colonization and played a major role in America’s westward expansion.

And it isn’t alone. There is world of minerals in mobile devices and other smart gadgets, all secured through extractive processes that take place all over the planet.

Environmental histories of resources like nickel in the Philippines, Peruvian silver, and deep-sea manganese show the crucial role of nature in politics. Synthetically derived materials made with petroleum like the plastic and fiberglass used to make circuit boards, and the rubber cases that protect phones from everyday damage have similar stories.

How can a pocket-sized device, one many of us are inseparable from, shed light on histories of science, technology, and the environment? How are changing environments embedded in everyday objects?

Using smart phones as a case study, this course will trace component parts to explore relationships between extraction and power. It will also consider these tiny computers over their entire lifetime from mining, manufacturing, and labor to the accumulation of e-waste. Who benefits the most in each of these stages? And who bears the brunt of the burden? How can we confront the challenges of climate change when the promise of renewable energy is powered by these precious metals? We will approach these questions through the lens of history and by the end of this course, we will be left with further questions about the resources that are yet to be artificially synthesized and encouraged to imagine a more equitable future.

 For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History 358: French Revolution and Napoleon

Instructor: Emma Kuby

TR 11:00am-12:15pm

Description: Explores the French Revolution and the Age of Napoleon. Why did Revolution break out in one of the most powerful and traditional monarchies of Europe? What were the roots of discontent and the sources of revolutionary ideas? Probes the exciting twists and turns of revolutionary politics and the attempt to spread “liberty & equality” into ordinary life, even abolishing slavery in response to massive slave revolt in the French colonies. Asks how the French interacted with a transnational revolutionary movement across Europe, the US, and the Atlantic world. Though focused on a specific revolutionary era, we will also reflect on timeless questions: Why is it so difficult to create democracy? Is violence ever justified to overcome oppression and injustice? Finally, why did this experiment in radical democracy also unleash the Terror and launch Napoleon Bonaparte, the politician and general who built an astonishing European Empire? And how did he pull it off for as long as he did?

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History 362: Athenian Democracy

Instructor: Claire Taylor

MWF 9:55-10:45am

Description: This course explores some key issues in the ideology and practice of Athenian democracy. It will examine democratic values, institutions, rhetoric, and sociology in order to provide students with the basic tools to understand democracy in its ancient context. It will engage with a variety of source material (literary, archaeological, epigraphic) in order to develop multiple skills of interpretation.

Some questions we will examine here: What are the key features of Athenian democracy, how did it change over time, and how did it differ from modern democracy? How did the Athenians justify and critique this political system? How did they reconcile citizen egalitarianism with social inequalities of wealth, gender, and status? To what extent were women, foreigners, slaves, or the poor included or excluded from politics? Was Athenian democracy a robust political system or a system in crisis?

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History 393: Slavery, Civil War, and Reconstruction, 1848-1877

Instructor: Stephen Kantrowitz

MW 4:00-5:15pm

Description: During the “Civil War Era,” the United States wrestled violently with the essential questions that have shaped its national life: the institution of chattel slavery; the meaning of race and the power of racism; the means and ideology of territorial conquest; the nature and extent of federal power; and the boundaries and rights of citizenship. This course explores the people who shaped those struggles, from those demanding freedom and equality to those determinedly opposed to those revolutions, and from Americans imagining an ever-expanding national domain to Native people asserting their own sovereignty against those visions.

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History 401-002: Exclusion & Resistance at UW-Madison

Instructor: Kacie Lucchini Butcher

W 3:30-5:25pm

Description: Introduction to the practice of public history. Public historians ground their work in rigorous, academic research with the goal of presenting history in a collaborative and publicly focused manner. These projects come in many forms including exhibits, walking tours, podcasts, documentaries, web projects, and place-based interpretation, to name a few. Learn how academic history gets presented to the public, not only by reading about public history, but by doing it.

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History 411: The Enlightenment and Its Critics

Instructor: Eric Carlsson

TR 9:30-10:45am

Description: The Enlightenment is a contested notion not just among scholars but also in wider cultural debates today. What was it? Why did it happen where and when it did? Was there a single Enlightenment or many? Why have some celebrated the Enlightenment as a source of all that is best in the modern world, while others have rejected it as a force for ill?

In this course we will ask and answer those questions, among others. We will engage with an era (c. 1650-1800) when norms that had shaped European life for many centuries faced unprecedented scrutiny. Long-held views on knowledge, nature, religion, politics, ethics, and how society should be ordered were challenged by bold new visions. Through their debates, Enlightenment thinkers and their critics shaped how many people today still think about such things. We will encounter some of the most articulate and and influential figures of the time while also considering broader shifts in society, culture, and mentalities.

Religion will play a key role in this course. That is because religion touched most aspects of life in early modern Europe, and the Enlightenment’s central debates turned, directly or indirectly, on questions to which religious traditions had long given answers. A few rejected all established religion and sought a secular basis for living and ordering the world. Some aimed to transform their religious traditions in light of new ideas and circumstances. Critics of various stripes repudiated such attempts and set out alternative paths. This course will equip you to think historically about these developments.

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History 450: Making of Modern South Asia

Instructor: Mou Banerjee

MW 4:00-5:15pm

Description: Everything you ever hear about South Asia is true. But the exact opposite is also true. Tradition and modernity, development and stagnation, the past and the future all exist simultaneously, at times in harmony and at other times in conflict with one another. Through an exploration of the political, social and economic history of this region from the 18th century to the present day, learn about the making of modern South Asia and attempt to understand this paradox.

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History 459: Rule of Law: Philosophical and Historical Models

Instructor: Karl Shoemaker

TR 11:00am-12:15pm

Description: From the perspectives of history and political theory, examines the multiple meanings of the idea of the rule of idea, and its uses in American history. Explore prominent critiques of the rule of law ideal. 

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History 500-001: Chinese Law and Society

Instructor: Joseph Dennis

TR 1:00-2:15pm

Description: This course is a reading seminar about law and society in China, mostly prior to 1949. The course will contain a comparative element to help students understand both similarities and differences with Western legal and governmental traditions and notions of rights and responsibilities. No knowledge of Chinese language or previous coursework in Chinese studies is required, but students who can read Chinese will have the option to substitute some Chinese language readings for the regularly assigned English language readings.

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History 500-002: The Queer Graphic Memoir in History

Instructor: Finn Enke

T 1:20-3:15pm

Description: Reading seminar delves into the origins and development of the queer graphic memoir as a genre of history. Memoir by queer, trans and nonbinary BIPOC and white authors address themes such as slavery, settler colonialism, social movements, immigration, community and identity, fame and censorship. We will read 10-12 graphic memoir. Ideally you will read them in hard copy rather than online if you are able. Each book will be on Reserve for 3-hour loan, but I strongly recommend getting a library card from the Madison Public Library as that will allow you to check out the books you need. The Public Library system is outstanding and very accessible and easy to use, and is FREE.

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History 500-003: Asian Intellectual History

Instructor: Viren Murthy

R 3:30-5:25pm

Description: How did people from Asian countries think about their world? This course introduces the fundamental texts of Asian philosophy or Asian Intellectual History, while discussing the stakes involved in naming intellectual history or philosophy. In addition to learning about the content of classics in Chinese, Indian and Japanese philosophy, students will inquire into parallels between Asian and European philosophy. Moreover, we will examine both indigenous and exogenous roots of modern thought in China, India and Japan. Did these countries require the West to become modern or did they have internal logics that pointed towards modernity.

To facilitate a historical understanding of Asian thought, the course will be divided into three parts. We will begin by reading texts, including Confucius’ Analects (551-479BC), the Laozi (fl. 600 BC), among others. Through these texts, students will become familiar with certain basic concepts, including the Way (Dao), ritual, benevolence, Brahman and nothingness.

The second section of the course will examine how these and related concepts were reinterpreted by Asian thinkers in specific historical junctures. Scholars’ reading and teaching Western philosophy often refer to conceptual shifts that took place during the modern period, (with philosophers, such as Descartes, Spinoza and Hume). In this course, we will ask whether we can speak of similar shifts in Asian intellectual history.

The final section of the course will move to the twentieth century and the contemporary period and examines the way various scholars mobilized Asian thought against modernity and Western imperialism. In this context, in addition to examining Gandhi and Mao, we will deal with major contemporary thinkers such as the Chinese New Leftist intellectual Wang Hui and the Japanese contemporary thinker Karatani Kojin. We are very fortunate this year to be able to invite Wang Hui from China to visit our class in person.

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History 500-004: History of Finance

Instructor: Daniel Stolz

R 1:20-3:15pm 

Description: Advanced exploration of selected topics, featuring small group discussion and intensive engagement with historical materials.

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History of Science 531: Women and Health in American History

Instructor: Judith Houck

TR 9:30-10:45am

Description: Women as patients and as health professionals in America from the colonial period to the present.

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History 600 – All Sections

All sections of History 600 require permission of the instructor for enrollment. Please see the History 600 Seminars page for more information and course descriptions.

History 601: Historical Publishing Practicum

Instructor: Giuliana Chamedes

 T 3:30-5:25pm 

Description: Hands-on instruction and experience in historical publishing. Discussion of the nature of historical research and writing.

For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History 607: The American Impact Abroad: The Historical Dimension

Instructor: Brenda Gayle Plummer 

MW 4:00-5:15pm 

Description: Analysis of diplomatic, economic, cultural, and social interaction of Americans with foreign peoples and nations.

 For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

History 680: Honors Thesis Colloquium & History 690: Thesis Colloquium

Instructor: Kathryn Ciancia

M 1:20-3:15pm

Description: Colloquium for thesis writers.

 For more information, visit Course Search & Enroll.

Cross-Listed Courses in History & History of Science

  • History/Educational Policy Studies 107: The History of the University in the West
    Instructor: Matthew Farrelly
    Please contact the Department of Educational Policy Studies with questions about this course.

  • History/Educational Policy Studies 143: History of Race and Inequality
    Instructor: Daniel Berman
    Please contact the Department of Educational Policy Studies with questions about this course.

  • History of Science/Environmental Studies 213: Global Environmental Health: An Interdisciplinary Introduction
    Instructor: TBA
    Please contact the Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies with questions about this course.

  • History/Art History/Environmental Studies/Geography/Landscape Architecture 239: Making the American Landscape
    Instructor: Anna Andrzejewski
    Please contact the Department of Art History with questions about this course.

  • History/Geography/Political Science/Slavic 254: Eastern Europe: An Interdisciplinary Survey
    Instructor: David Danaher
    Please contact the Department of German, Nordic, and Slavic+ with questions about this course.

  • History/Afro-American Studies/Anthropology/Geography/Latin American, Caribbean, and Iberian Studies/Political Science/Community and Environmental Sociology/Sociology/Spanish 260: Latin America: An Introduction
    Instructor: TBA
    Please contact the Latin American, Caribbean, and Iberian Studies Program with questions about this course.

  • History/Legal Studies 262: American Legal History, 1860 to the Present
    Instructor: Richard Keyser
    Please contact the Legal Studies Program with questions about this course.

  • History/Anthropology/Art History/Design Studies/Landscape Architecture 264: Dimensions of Material Culture
    Instructor: Marina Moskowitz
    Please contact the Department of Design Studies with questions about this course.

  • History/African Cultural Studies/Afro-American Studies/Anthropology/Geography/Political Science/Sociology 277: Africa: An Introductory Survey
    Instructor: Jacqueline-Bethel Mougoue
    Please contact the Department of African Cultural Studies with questions about this course.

  • History/Afro-American Studies 321: Afro-American History Since 1900
    Instructor: Brenda Gayle Plummer
    Please contact the Department of African American Studies with questions about this course.

  • History of Science/Medical History/Religious Studies 331: Science, Medicine and Religion
    Instructor: Cara Rock-Singer
    Please contact the Religious Studies Program with questions about this course.

  • History of Science 350-002: Racism, Colonialism, and the Environmental Sciences
    Instructor: Elizabeth Hennessy
    Please contact the Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies with questions about this course.

  • History/Educational Policy Studies 412: History of American Education
    Instructor: William Reese
    Please contact the Department of Educational Policy Studies with questions about this course.

  • History/Environmental Studies/Legal Studies 430: Law and Environment: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives
    Instructor: Richard Keyser
    Please contact the Legal Studies Program with questions about this course.

  • History/Environmental Studies 465: Global Environmental History
    Instructor: Doron Darnov
    Please contact the Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies with questions about this course.

  • History of Science/Mathematics 473: History of Mathematics
    Instructor: Oh Hoon Kwon
    Please contact the Department of Mathematics with questions about this course.

  • History/Legal Studies 477: History of Forensic Science
    Instructor: Mitra Sharafi
    Please contact the Legal Studies Program with questions about this course.

  • History of Science/Medical History 509: The Development of Public Health in America
    Instructor: Dana Landress
    Please contact the Department of Medical History & Bioethics with questions about this course.

  • History/Legal Studies 510: Legal Pluralism
    Instructor: Mitra Sharafi
    Please contact the Legal Studies Program with questions about this course.

  • History of Science/Geoscience 514: History of Geologic Thought
    Instructor: Basil Tikoff
    Please contact the Department of Geoscience with questions about this course.

  • History/Classics/Religious Studies 517: Religions and the Ancient Mediterranean
    Instructor: Jeff Beneker
    Please contact the Department of Classical and Ancient Near Eastern Studies with questions about this course.

  • History of Science/English/Medical History 525: Health and the Humanities
    Instructor: Caroline Hensley
    Please contact the Department of English with questions about this course.

  • History of Science/Gender & Women’s Studies 537: Childbirth in the U.S.
    Instructor: Annie Menzel
    Please contact the Department of Gender & Women’s Studies with questions about this course.

  • History/Sociology 670: Capitalism, Socialism, and Democracy in America Since 1890
    Instructor: Chad Goldberg
    Please contact the Department of Sociology with questions about this course.

Undergraduate Catalog

The University of Wisconsin’s Undergraduate Guide is the central location for official information about its departments and programs. Find the Department of History’s entries here, including the official requirements of the major.

[archive of UW Undergraduate Catalogs, dating to 1995, and Graduate Catalogs from 1994]
[archive of History course catalogs, dating from 1852 to 1996]