University of Wisconsin–Madison

Thematic

Pre-Matriculation

  • Committee on Institutional Cooperation Graduate Application Fee Waiver

    The CIC is a consortium of 12 research universities, including the 11 members of the Big Ten Conference and the University of Chicago. The CIC FreeApp program is designed to expand participation of underrepresented students in graduate education—including American Indians, Black Americans, Mexican-Americans, and Puerto Ricans. Through this program, prospective students can apply for a graduate application fee waiver. Applications can be submitted between August 15th and November 15th. Visit the Committee on Institutional Cooperation Graduate Application Fee Waiver webpage for more information.

  • Jack Kent Cooke Graduate Scholarship

    One of the largest and most competitive scholarship programs in the nation, the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation Graduate Scholarship provides awards of up to $50,000 per year for up to six years of study to deserving low-income college seniors and recent college graduates (who graduated within the past five years).

    The amount and duration of the Foundation’s awards vary, based on factors that include cost of graduate education and other scholarships received. Approximately 1,000 students are nominated for the program each year, with approximately 50 receiving the Foundation’s financial assistance to attend the nation’s top graduate and professional schools. They must apply in the spring, after they have applied to graduate school, and must do so through their undergraduate institution. Visit the Jack Kent Cooke Graduate Scholarship webpage for more information.

  • Jacob Javits Fellowship

    The Javits provides fellowships to students of superior academic ability—selected on the basis of demonstrated achievement, financial need, and exceptional promise—to undertake study at the doctoral and Master of Fine Arts level in selected fields of arts, humanities, and social sciences. Panels of experts appointed by the Javits Fellowship Board (Board) select fellows according to criteria established by the Board. Students must demonstrate financial need by filing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid. Subject to the availability of funds, a fellow receives the Javits fellowship annually for up to the lesser of 48 months or the completion of their degree. The fellowship consists of an institutional payment (tuition) and a stipend based on the fellow’s financial need. Visit the Jacob Javits Fellowship webpage for more information.

Applicant Specific Awards

  • American Association of University Women—American Dissertation Fellowships (Women in all Geographic Fields)

    One of the world’s largest sources of funding exclusively for graduate women, the AAUW Educational Foundation supports aspiring scholars around the globe, teachers and activists in local communities, women at critical stages of their careers, and those pursuing professions where women are underrepresented. Dissertation Fellowships are available to women who will complete their dissertation writing between April 1st and June 30st. To qualify, applicants must have completed all course work, passed all required preliminary examinations, and received approval for their research proposal or plan by November 15. Students holding any fellowship for writing a dissertation in the year prior to the AAUW Educational Foundation fellowship year are not eligible. Open to applicants in all fields of study. Scholars engaged in science, technology, engineering and math and also researching gender issues are especially encouraged to apply. The award is $20,000. The deadline is usually November. Visit the American Association of University Women—American Dissertation Fellowships webpage for more information, including the application.

  • Association of American Indian Affairs—Sequoyah Scholarships

    Since 1922, the Association on American Indian Affairs has been dedicated to helping Native people and their communities in meeting the challenges they face. One of these challenges is that of paying for a higher education. The Association on American Indian Affairs offers Sequoyah Graduate Scholarships in the amount of $1,500 to students in any curriculum. Disbursement in the amount of $750 is made directly to the college fall and spring semesters pending satisfactory progress. Spring disbursement requires a copy of the fall semesters’ grades and a spring semester class schedule. This scholarship does not automatically renew. Students are eligible to apply on a yearly basis. The application deadline is usually July 1st. Visit the Sequoyah Scholarships webpage for more information.

  • The Ford Foundation—Pre-Doctoral and Dissertation Fellowships

    The Mary Isabel Sibley Fellowship is available for women intending to pursue postgraduate research in humanities and is awarded alternately in the fields of Greek and French. The award may be used for the study of Greek language, literature, history or archaeology, or for the study of French language or literature. The Fellowship is awarded annually and has a stipend of $20,000. Candidates must be unmarried women between the 25 and 35 years of age (inclusive) who have demonstrated their ability to carry on original research. They must hold the doctorate or have fulfilled all the requirements for the doctorate except the dissertation, and they must be planning to devote full-time work to research during the Fellowship year. Applications will be available in the Fall and are usually due January 15th. Go to the Ford Foundation – Pre-Doctoral and Dissertation Fellowships webpage for more information.

  • The Kosciuszko Foundation’s Tuition Scholarship Program (Poland)

    Kosciuszko Foundation Tuition Scholarships support American students of Polish descent for full-time graduate studies in the United States, the one-year Master’s program at the Center for European Studies, Jagiellonian University, Cracow, and English Schools of Medicine in Poland. Funding for any major. Scholarships range from $1,000 to $7,000. Only United States citizens and permanent residents of Polish descent who are beginning or continuing graduate studies are eligible. This is for full-time studies only. The deadline is usually in January; notifications are in May. Visit the Kosciuszko Foundation’s Tuition Scholarship Program webpage for more information.

  • Mary Isabel Sibley Fellowship (Female Candidates, Greece and France)

    The Mary Isabel Sibley Fellowship is available for women intending to pursue postgraduate research in humanities and is awarded alternately in the fields of Greek and French. The award may be used for the study of Greek language, literature, history or archaeology, or for the study of French language or literature. The Fellowship is awarded annually and has a stipend of $20,000. Candidates must be unmarried women between the 25 and 35 years of age (inclusive) who have demonstrated their ability to carry on original research. They must hold the doctorate or have fulfilled all the requirements for the doctorate except the dissertation, and they must be planning to devote full-time work to research during the Fellowship year. Applications will be available in the Fall and are usually due in January. Go to the Mary Isabel Sibley Fellowship webpage for more information.

  • The Newberry Library’s Frances C. Allen Fellowship

    This fellowship is for women of Native American heritage. While candidates for this award may be working in any graduate or pre-professional field, the particular goal of the Allen Fellowship is to encourage Native American women in their studies of the humanities and social sciences. Financial support varies according to need and may include travel expenses. Allen Fellows are expected to spend a significant part of their tenure in residence at the Newberry’s D’Arcy McNickle Center for American Indian History. The tenure of the fellowship is from one month to one year; the fellowship provides up to $8,000 in approved expenses. Please note: applicants for the Allen Fellowship must fill out a supplementary form in addition to the cover sheet for special awards and fellowships. Visit the Frances C. Allen Fellowship webpage for more information.

  • OAH Huggins-Quarles Award

    Named for Benjamin Quarles and Nathan Huggins, two outstanding historians of the African American past, the Huggins-Quarles Award is given annually to one or two graduate students of color at the dissertation research stage of their Ph.D. program. To apply for a $1,000 award ($2,000 if only one is awarded), the student should submit a five-page dissertation proposal (which should include a definition of the project, an explanation of the project’s significance and contribution to the field, and a description of the most important primary sources), along with a one-page itemized budget explaining travel and research plans. Each application must be accompanied by a letter from the dissertation adviser attesting to the student’s status and the ways in which the Huggins-Quarles Award will facilitate the completion of the dissertation project. Please also include email addresses for both the applicant and the adviser, if available. One complete copy of each application (including cover letter, abstract, budget, and reference letter), clearly labeled “2009 Huggins-Quarles Award Entry,” must be mailed to each member of the Committee on the Status of African American, Latino/a, Asian American, and Native American Historians (ALANA) and ALANA Histories listed below and received by December 1st. The committee will evaluate the applications and announce the award at the annual meeting of the OAH. Visit the OAH Huggins-Quarles Award webpage for more information.

  • The Paul & Daisy Soros Fellowships for New Americans

    The purpose of The Paul & Daisy Soros Fellowships for New Americans is to provide opportunities for continuing generations of able and accomplished New Americans to achieve leadership in their chosen fields. The Program is established in recognition of the contributions New Americans have made to American life and in gratitude for the opportunities the United States has afforded the donors and their family. Any academic discipline or professional field is eligible. The awards are typically open to seniors in a bachelor’s program or beyond. Applicants must be between 20 and 30 years of age; status as a “New American” (holder of a green card, naturalized citizen, or child of two naturalized citizen parents). The Fellowships are grants for up to two years of graduate study in the U.S., with a third year at the discretion of the Program. The application deadline is usually in November. See Soros Fellowship webpage for more information.

  • The Resident Scholars Program

    Katrin H. Lamon Fellowship – One fellowship is available for a Native American scholar, either pre- or post-doctoral, working in either the humanities or the sciences.

    Anne Ray Fellowship – One fellowship is available for an established Native American scholar, working in the humanities, arts, or the sciences, who has a commitment to providing mentorship to recent Native graduates or graduate students. In addition to working on their own research, the Anne Ray Resident Scholar serves as a mentor to two Native interns working at the Indian Arts Research Center.

    SAR is also interested in hosting exceptional scholars who have received funding through the following programs: Ford Foundation Diversity Fellowships, Mellon/ACLS Recent Doctoral Recipients Fellowships, and Visiting Fulbright Scholar fellowships. Applicants to these non-SAR fellowship programs whose research is consistent with SAR’s mission may be able to join the School’s dynamic intellectual community for the duration of their fellowship. Visit the Resident Scholars Program webpage for more information.

  • The Smithsonian Institute’s Latino Studies Fellowship Program

    This program provides opportunities to US Latino/a predoctoral students and postdoctoral and senior scholars to pursue research topics that relate to Latino art, culture, and history. Interdisciplinary subjects are encouraged and can be undertaken at more than one of the Smithsonian museums and/or research units, and advised by one or more of the Smithsonian research staff members. This program differs from the Smithsonian Institution Fellowship Program. It is intended to broaden and increase the body of Latino related research that is being conducted at the Smithsonian Institution. While not a condition of the award, fellows are invited to pursue a portion of their project in the field: at other museums or research facilities, as well as in communities where primary data can be collected. A research and travel allowance will be made available to cover additional costs of spending up to one third of the fellowship tenure away from the Smithsonian, if appropriate and necessary, but not at the fellow’s home institution. The term for fellowships are available for 3 to 12 months while the stipends are as follows: Senior and Postdoctoral – $40,000 per year; pre-doctoral – $25,000 per year. The application deadline is January 15th (postmark) for awards to begin on or after June 1st.

    Applicants are urged to apply concurrently to all other SI programs for which they may be eligible. Visit the Smithsonian Institute’s Latino Studies Fellowship Program webpage for more information.

  • SHAFR’s Myrna F. Bernath Fellowship

    The Myrna Bernath Fellowship of $5,000 is intended to defray the costs of scholarly research by women. It is awarded biannually (in odd years) and announced at the SHAFR luncheon held during the annual meeting of the Organization of American Historians. Applications are welcomed from women at U.S. universities as well as women abroad who wish to do research in the United States. Preference will be given to graduate students within five years of completion of their Ph.D.s. Within eight months of receiving the award, each successful applicant must file with the SHAFR Business Office a brief report on how the funds were spent. Such reports will be considered for publication in Passport. The deadline for applications is usually December 1st. Visit the SHAFR’s Myrna F. Bernath Fellowship webpage for more information.

History of Women and Gender

  • The Coordinating Council for Women in History’s Catherine Prelinger Scholarship

    The CCWH is pleased to announce it will accept applications for the tenth CCWH Catherine Prelinger Award Scholarship of $20,000. This award, named for Catherine Prelinger, a former CCWH president and nontraditional scholar, is intended to enhance the work of a contemporary scholar whose academic path has not followed the traditional path of uninterrupted study, moving from completed secondary, to undergraduate, then graduate degrees, followed by a tenure-track faculty position. These funds were granted to CCWH by an anonymous donor in honor of the many years of work this organization has devoted to exploring women’s history, encouraging opportunities for women in the historical profession, and in educating young women to pursue careers in the historical profession. This award is intended to enhance the ability of the recipient to carry on these CCWH traditions through contributions to women in history, either through scholarly or professional activity.

    Eligible applicants must be members of CCWH and must hold either A.B.D. status or the Ph.D. at the time of application. They shall be actively engaged in scholarship that is historical in nature, although the degree may be in related fields. Applicants will show evidence of a nontraditional professional career and describe a project that will further enhance women’s roles in history. The Prelinger Committee encourages applications from independent and non-academic scholars. Application guidelines and forms can be found on the CCWH website.

  • Duke’s Rare Book, Manuscript, and Special Collections Library’s Mary Lily Research Grants

    The Bingham Center offers Mary Lily Research Grants for research involving the use of their collections or research into other collections with a focus on women’s history and culture. Particular strengths of the Sallie Bingham Center’s collections are the history of feminist activism and theory, prescriptive literature, girls’ literature, artist’s books by women, lay and ordained church women, gender expression, women’s sexuality, and the history and culture of women in the South. Applications are usually due in January. Awards will be announced in March. Visit the Mary Lily Research Grants webpage for more information.

  • The Woodrow Wilson Dissertation Fellowship in Women’s Studies

    The Woodrow Wilson Dissertation Fellowship in Women’s Studies encourages original and significant research about women that crosses disciplinary, regional, or cultural boundaries. Previous Fellows have explored such topics as transnational religious education for Muslim women, the complex gender dynamics of voluntary marriage migration, women’s role in African-American adult literacy, women’s sports, militarism and the education of American women, and the relationship between family commitments and women’s work mobility. The Women’s Studies Fellowships are provided to Ph.D. candidates at institutions in the United States who will complete their dissertations during the fellowship year. The most competitive applications include not only a clear, thorough, and compelling description of the candidate’s work, but also evidence of an enduring interest in and commitment to women’s issues and scholarship on women. The deadline for all application materials is usually in early October. Visit the Woodrow Wilson Dissertation Fellowship in Women’s Studies webpage for more information.

Jewish History

  • Center for Jewish History Fellowship Program

    The Center for Jewish History (CJH) composed of its five partners—the American Jewish Historical Society, American Sephardi Federation, Leo Baeck Institute, Yeshiva University Museum, YIVO Institute for Jewish Research—offers fellowships that are intended for Ph.D. candidates. The awards support original research at the Center for Jewish History in the field of Jewish Studies. Preference will be given to those candidates who draw on the library and archival resources of more than one partner. Full fellowships carry a stipend of up to $12,500 for a period of one academic year. It is expected that applicants will have completed all requirements for the doctoral degree except for the dissertation (ABD). It is required that each fellow chosen for the award:

    • Conduct research for the duration of the award at a minimum of 2 days/week in the Lillian Goldman Reading Room using the archival and library resources. Please note that the Center reserves the right to withhold stipends from fellows who do not fulfill the attendance commitment.
    • Participate in a Center for Jewish History Seminar and deliver a minimum of one lecture (during or beyond the grant period) based on research at the Center and the collections used; or participate in exhibition planning (for curatorial fellows only).

    Non-USA citizens must have the appropriate visa in order to accept the award, and so hold that visa for the duration of the award. Applications are usually due on February 1st. Visit the Center for Jewish History Fellowship Program webpage for more information.

  • Leo Baeck Institute for the Study of the History & Culture of German-Speaking Jewry (U.S. and Germany—MA and Research)

    LBI and DAAD Fellowships – The LBI and the DAAD announce the availability of two fellowships per year for doctoral students affiliated with an accredited U.S. institution of higher education or recent Ph.D.’s. They provide financial assistance to students for dissertation research work and to academics for writing a scholarly essay or book. Extensive use of LBI New York resources is to aid research projects falling within the field of study served by the LBI, namely the social, communal and intellectual history of German-speaking Jewry. The fellowship consists of a stipend of $2000, paid in two installments of $1000, and is normally used within one calendar year. Support for travel or family members is not available. Applicants must be US citizens, and Ph.D. candidates or recent Ph.D’s who have received their degrees within the preceding two years.

    The LBI and the DAAD also announce the availability of one six- month, or two three-month graduate felllowship(s) per year for doctoral students or academics affiliated with an accredited U.S. institution of higher education. The fellowship is to provide financial assistance to doctoral students doing research for their dissertation and to academics in the preparation of a scholarly essay or book that requires a period of research in libraries, archives or research institutions in the Federal Republic of Germany. The research must be in the field of study served by the LBI, i.e. the social, communal and intellectual history of German-speaking Jewry. The fellowship consists of a monthly stipend of up to EUR 975.00 (depending on level of academic advancement) to cover expenses during the time abroad. The tenure of the fellowship must fall within the period July through January. Support for travel is a one-time lump sum of EUR 520.00. Support for family members is not available. The stipend will be paid in monthly installments after arrival in the Federal Republic of Germany. Applicants must be US citizens, and Ph.D. candidates or recent Ph.D.s. who have received their degrees within the preceding two years.

    Fritz Halbers Fellowship – The LBI announces the availability of one or more fellowship per year for students enrolled in a Ph.D. program at an accredited institution of higher education. The fellowships provide financial assistance to scholars whose research projects are connected with the culture and history of German-speaking Jewry. The fellowship(s) consists of an award, not exceeding $ 3000–, to be determined according to the requirements of the project. The fellowship should be used by the end of the year in which it was granted. Support for travel or family members is not available. Applications for the fellowship must be submitted in writing to the Director not later than November 1st. Decisions will be announced in January.

    Fred Grubel Fellowship – The LBI announces the availability of a paid summer internship program for a graduate student who will participate in work on a specific research topic (jointly determined by the candidate and the LBI) related to LBI collections, which can include archives, library, photo collection, and art collection. The research project should pertain to the lives of refugees of the 1930s and 1940s in New York. The fellow will be supervised by the director of research and will work on a day-to-day basis with archives and library staff. Ph.D. candidates from history, sociology, literature, or Jewish studies programs are eligible. The compensation is $1,500 per month. The deadline for applications is the fall of the year prior to the summer internship. Decisions will be made in early spring.

    Visit the Leo Baeck Fellowships webpage for more information on any of these awards.

  • The Foundation for Jewish Culture’s Maurice and Marilyn Cohen Fund for Doctoral Dissertation Fellowships (Write Up)

    These fellowships encourage scholarly research, publication and teaching in the various disciplines of Jewish studies. Established in 1960, they have been awarded to nearly 600 scholars, including many leaders in the field. The fellowships apply to one academic year and are toward the completion of a dissertation, typically in the fifth year of study. Applicants are expected to have finished all doctoral requirements, except for the thesis, and should show evidence of being able to complete their thesis within the fellowship year. The Foundation currently awards five Fellowships at $16,000 per grant Applicants must be citizens or permanent residents of the United States or Canada. International students cannot be granted fellowships at this time. A strong preference is given to individuals preparing for academic careers in Jewish studies, and to those who indicate that they will pursue a career in the United States. Visit the Foundation for Jewish Culture Fellowship webpage for more information.

  • Memorial Foundation for Jewish Culture

    The International Doctoral Scholarship for Studies Specializing in Jewish Fields aims to help train qualified individuals for careers in Jewish scholarship and research, and to help Jewish educational, religious, and communal workers obtain advanced training for leadership positions. Grants range up to $10,000 a year and can be renewed for up to four years. Only dissertators are eligible. All applications are due by October 31st. Visit the Memorial Foundation for Jewish Culture webpage for more information.

  • US Holocaust Museum’s Residential Research Fellowship (Research and Write Up)

    The Center awards fellowships to support significant research and writing about the Holocaust. Awards are granted on a competitive basis. The Center welcomes proposals from scholars in all relevant disciplines including history, political science, literature, Jewish studies, philosophy, religion, psychology, comparative genocide studies, law and others. Fellowships are awarded to candidates working on their dissertations (ABD), postdoctoral researchers, and senior scholars. Applicants must be affiliated with an academic and/or research institution when applying for a fellowship. Immediate post-docs and faculty between appointments will also be considered. The specific fellowship and the length of the award are at the discretion of the Center. Individual awards generally range up to nine months of residency. A minimum tenure of three consecutive months is required. Fellowships of five months or longer have proven most effective. Stipends range up to $3,500 per month. Residents of the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area receive a modified stipend and term of residency at the Center. All awards include a stipend to offset the cost of direct travel to and from Washington, D.C., and visa assistance if necessary. Fellows are responsible for securing their own housing accommodations and health insurance. The Center does not provide support allowances for accompanying family members. The Museum provides work space and access to a computer, telephone, facsimile machine, and photocopier. Cost-sharing by home institutions or other relevant organizations is encouraged to extend the residency of the applicant at the Museum or to make possible additional research at other institutions in the Unites States and abroad. The deadline for fellowship applications is November of each year. Awards are announced the following April. The application can be found at the US Holocaust Museum’s Residential Research Fellowship webpage.

Military History

  • Center for Military History—Fellowships & Awards

    The CMH offers three Dissertation Fellowships each year. One, funded by the National Museum of the U.S. Army, is designed to support dissertations that explore the material culture of the Army; the two others support research in the more general areas of military history in all its many aspects. In your application please specify if you wish to compete for the two general fellowships or for the Museums fellowship. These fellowships carry a $10,000 stipend and access to the Center’s facilities and technical expertise. For purposes of this program, the history of war on land is broadly defined, including such areas a biography, military campaigns, military organization and administration, policy, strategy, tactics, weaponry, technology, training, logistics, and the evolution of civil-military relations. In the selection of proposals for funding, preference is given to topics on the history of the U.S. Army. Applications and all supporting documents for the Dissertation Fellowships must be postmarked no later than January 15th each year. Visit the Center for Military History—Fellowships & Awards webpage for more information.

  • Hayes Pre-doctoral Fellowship (U. S. Naval History)

    The Naval Historical Center, Department of the Navy, using non-appropriated funds, is offering one pre-doctoral fellowship in U.S. naval history for an academic year. The Naval Historical Center will provide financial and scholarly aid for dissertation research and writing. The subject matter of dissertations supported should significantly enhance knowledge of U.S. naval history. The Naval Historical Center – The Naval Historical Center is located in the Washington Navy Yard, Washington, DC. The library, archival, and museum resources of the Center are extremely rich, and are augmented by proximity of the U. S. National Archives and the Library of Congress. Fellows will be provided desk space in the Naval Historical Center. A stipend of $10,000 for the fellowship year will be provided in two payments. The first half of the grant will be paid in September. The second half will be paid in January, upon certification that satisfactory progress had been made since October. The award of the grant will depend on the continuing availability of funds. Applicants must be citizens of the United States; enrolled in a recognized graduate school; have completed requirements for the Ph.D. except the dissertation by a specified date; and have an approved dissertation topic in the field of U. S. naval history. Applications are usually due in February and the announcement in May. Visit the Hayes Pre-doctoral Fellowship webpage for more information.

  • The Marine Corps

    Lieutenant Colonel Lily H. Gridley Memorial Master’s Thesis Fellowship – The United States Marine Corps offers a number of $3,500 Master’s Thesis Fellowships each academic year to qualified graduate students working on topics pertinent to Marine Corps history. Topics in U.S. military and naval history, and history-based studies in the social and behavioral sciences, with a direct relationship to the U.S. Marine Corps will be considered. Within this context, topics may encompass wars, institutions, organization and administration, policy, biography, civil affairs and civic action, civil-military relations, weaponry and technology, manpower, training and education, strategy, tactics, and logistics, as well as diplomatic, political, economic, social, and intellectual trends affecting the Marine Corps in war and peace. This program gives preference to projects covering the pre-1991 period where records are declassified or can be most readily declassified and made available to scholars. In all cases the topic must have the approval of the graduate student’s thesis advisor, and it must have the potential of furthering the understanding of some aspect of Marine Corps history. Applicants must be actively enrolled in an accredited master’s degree program which requires a master’s thesis. Since the purposes of these fellowships include the desire to expose fellows to research in the main Federal archival centers, and to encourage the use of Marine Corps historical archives and museum collections, fellowship recipients are encouraged to do part of their research in the Quantico, Virginia-Washington, D.C., area. This does not preclude research elsewhere. The deadline for filing applications and all supporting documents is May 1st each year. The President of the Marine Corps Heritage Foundation will notify all applicants individually by letter of their selection no later than mid-July.

    General Lemuel C. Shepherd, Jr. Memorial Dissertation Fellowship – The United States Marine Corps offers one $10,000 dissertation fellowship per academic year, to be awarded to a qualified graduate student working on a doctoral dissertation pertinent to Marine Corps history. Applicants must be enrolled in a recognized graduate school, have completed by September all requirements for the doctoral degree except the dissertation, and have an approved, pertinent dissertation topic. Recipients of the Marine Corps’ master’s thesis fellowships may apply. Since one objective of the fellowship program is to enable fellows to use the major archival and other information centers in the nation’s capital, fellows are encouraged to do a portion of their research in the Quantico, Virginia-Washington, D.C., area. This does not preclude research in other locations as the recipient deems appropriate. Topics the same as listed above will be considered; deadlines are also the same.

    Research Grants – The Marine Corps also offers research grants of $400 to $3,000 to encourage graduate-level and advanced study in Marine Corps history and related fields. While the program concentrates on graduate students, grants are available to other qualified persons. Applicants for grants should have the ability to conduct advanced study in those aspects of American military history and museum activities directly related to the U.S. Marine Corps. Considered topics of study are the same as above, though the program gives preference to projects covering the pre-1991 period where records are declassified or can be most readily declassified and made available to scholars. In all cases, the research must result in a finite product which directly furthers or illuminates some aspect of the history of the Marine Corps. Examples of such finite products are an article for a professional journal, a publishable monograph or essay, a bibliography, a work of art, a museum display, or a diorama. The Director of Marine Corps History makes the final selection for grants less than $1,000; larger grants require the approval of the Marine Corps Heritage Foundation, the funding organization. All awards are made on merit, regardless of race, color, creed, or gender. Evaluation is based upon evidence of ability, including academic records, letters of recommendation, and upon the nature of the proposed research and its potential value to the Marine Corps’ historical program.

    Visit the Marine Corps Grants & Internships webpage for information on all three of these awards.

History of Science and Technology

  • Bakken Fellowships and Grants (History of Science and Technology)

    The Bakken, located in Minneapolis, is a center for education and learning that furthers the understanding of the history, cultural context, and applications of electricity and magnetism in the life sciences and their benefits to contemporary society. Artists and scholars are invited to apply for fellowships and grants, which the Bakken offers to encourage research in its collection of books, journals, manuscripts, prints, and instruments. The awards are to be used to help defray the expenses of travel, subsistence, and other direct costs of conducting research at the Bakken. Research Travel Grants are awarded up to a maximum of $500 (domestic) and $750 (foreign); the minimum period of residence is one week. Visiting Research Fellowships are awarded up to a maximum of $1,500; the minimum period of residence is two weeks. Preference is given to researchers who are interested in collaborating for a day or two during their research visit with the Bakken on exhibits or other programs. Visit the Bakken Fellowships and Grants webpage for more information.

  • The Chemical Heritage Foundation (History of Science, Chemistry especially)

    Through the Beckman Center, CHF offers long-term fellowships for periods of up to 9 months to support scholars in residence for the 2008-2009 academic year. To be eligible applicants must either have a Ph.D. (or equivalent) or be a doctoral candidate at the dissertation stage. Research projects must be in an area of the chemical and molecular sciences, technologies, and industries, broadly construed in terms of subject and time period. Named fellowships within this group include the following: Robert W. Allington Fellowship, for general research in the history of chemical & molecular sciences, technologies, and industries ($43,000); Gordon Cain Fellowship in Technology, Policy, and Entrepreneurship, for historical research on the development of the chemical industries ($43,000); Sydney M. Edelstein Fellowship, for general research in the history of chemical & molecular sciences, technologies, and industries ($43,000); Robert W. Gore Fellowship in Materials Innovation, open to advanced Ph.D. candidates who possess the skills to conduct historical case studies of materials innovations of the past thirty years and to communicate findings to academic, policy, and industrial audiences ($35,000 plus small research allowance); John C. Haas Fellowships, for research that will enhance public understanding of the chemical industries in relation to environmental, societal, health, and safety issues ($43,000,two fellowships offered); Charles C. Price Fellowship in Polymer History, for research on the history of the chemical sciences and technologies ($20,000). Short term fellowships and travel grants are also available for similar research topics.

    There is no specific application form to apply for CHF fellowships. Also please note that, unlike past procedures, you do not have to apply for a specific fellowship (apart from the Gore, Société, and Ullyot fellowships) but simply for a long-term or short-term fellowship. The deadline is usually in February. Visit the Chemical Heritage Foundation webpage for more information on any of the awards.

  • The Francis A. Countway Library Fellowship in the History of Medicine

    The Francis A. Countway Library Fellowship in the History of Medicine provides a stipend of up to $5,000 to support travel, lodging, and incidental expenses for a flexible period between June 1st and May 31st. Besides conducting research, the fellow will submit a report on the results of his/her residency. The fellowship proposal should demonstrate that the Countway Library has resources central to the research topic. Preference will be given to applicants who live beyond commuting distance of the Countway, which is in Boston. The application, outlining the proposed project (proposal should not exceed five pages), length of residence, materials to be consulted, and a budget with specific information on travel, lodging, and research expenses, should be submitted, along with a curriculum vitae and two letters of recommendation, usually in January. The appointment will be announced in March. Visit the Francis A. Countway Library Fellowship in the History of Medicine webpage for more information.

  • The Herb Society of America Research Grant

    The HSA offers annual research grants to students, professionals, and individuals engaged in research on the horticultural, scientific, and/or social applications or use of herbs throughout history. The HSA Research Grant is intended to support small, self-contained research projects that can be carried out in a short period of time. While it is not anticipated that a HSA Research Grant will completely fund a project, there should be no duplication or overlap of funding for specific budget items. Successful applicants will be required to sign a Grant Acceptance Form prior to the award of a grant. The grant is for a one-year period of work. The maximum amount available is $5,000. One-half of the grant is paid at the outset of research, while every four months grantees must submit a brief progress report on work completed. When sufficient progress is demonstrated, succeeding grant payments can be made. A final report must be sent to the Research Grants Committee chairperson. Upon receipt of that report, the final payment can be made. One paper about the project or the results must be submitted for use in a Society publication. Any publications using information obtained from Society funding shall give proper credit for financial support by HSA. However, HSA reserves the right to reject or accept credit in any publication resulting from the grant. Finally, if significant departures are made from the originally approved grant application or if the grantee cancels the project, immediate written notification must be sent to the Research Grants Committee chairperson. Based on this information or in the absence of an adequate final report, The Society reserves the right to terminate the grant and request a return of any portion of the grant not used for the intended purpose. Applications and proposals must be postmarked on or before January 31 to be considered for the current year. Visit the Herb Society of America Research Grant webpage for more information.

  • Henry Belin du Pont Dissertation Fellowships (History of Technology)

    The Hagley Museum and Library’s Center for the History of Business, Technology, and Society offers this fellowship for graduate students who have completed all course work for the doctoral degree and are conducting research on their dissertation. It invites applications from Ph.D. candidates whose research on important historical questions would benefit from use of Hagley’s research collections. Applications should demonstrate superior intellectual quality, present a persuasive methodology for the project, and show that there are significant research materials at Hagley pertinent to the dissertation.

    This is a residential fellowship with a term of four months. The fellowship provides $6,000, free housing on Hagley’s grounds in Wilmington, DE, use of a computer, mail and internet access, and an office. Recipients are expected to have no other obligations during the term of the fellowship, to maintain continuous residence for the duration of the fellowship, and to participate in events organized by Hagley’s Center of the History of Business, Technology, and Society. At the end of residency the recipient will make a presentation based on research conducted during the fellowship. Hagley will also receive a copy of the dissertation, as well as any publications aided by the fellowship. Visit the Henry Belin du Pont Dissertation Fellowships webpage for more information.

  • Huntington Library Dibner History of Science Program Short-Term Awards (Any Stage)

    The Huntington is an independent research center with holdings in British and American history, literature, art history, and the history of science and medicine. Its areas of special strength include the Middle Ages, Renaissance, Eighteenth Century, Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century Literature, British Drama, Colonial America, American Civil War, Western America, and California. These fellowships derive from a variety of funding sources and have different terms. Recipients of all fellowships are expected to be in continuous residence at The Huntington and to participate in and make a contribution to its intellectual life. The Dibner History of Science Program Short-Term Awards are intended to further study at the Burndy Library and the other history of science and technology resources at The Huntington. These awards last one-to-five months; pay $2500 per month; and both PhD and pre-doctoral candidates accepted.

  • The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers History Center’s Fellowship

    This award supports either one year of full-time graduate work in the history of electrical science and technology at a college or university of recognized standing, or up to one year of post-doctoral research for a scholar in this field who has received their Ph.D. within the past three years. The stipend is US$17,000, and a research budget of US$3,000 is available. Candidates with undergraduate degrees in engineering, the sciences, or the humanities are eligible for the Fellowship. For pre-doctoral applicants, however, the award is conditional upon acceptance of the candidate into an appropriate graduate program in history at a school of recognized standing. In addition, they may not hold or subsequently receive other fellowships, but they may earn up to US$5,000 for work that is directly related to their graduate studies. Pre-doctoral Fellows must pursue full-time graduate work and evidence of satisfactory academic performance is required.

    The Fellow is selected on the basis of the candidate’s potential for pursuing research in and contributing to electrical history. This completed application packet should be sent to the Chairman, IEEE Fellowship in Electrical History Committee, IEEE History Center, Rutgers–The State University of New Jersey, 39 Union Street, New Brunswick, NJ USA 08901-8538. The deadline applications is February 15th. Applicants will be notified by June 1st. Visit the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers History Center’s Fellowship webpage for more information.

  • The Lemelson Center Fellows Program

    The Lemelson Center Fellows Program supports projects that present creative approaches to the study of invention and innovation in American society. These include, but are not limited to, historical research and documentation projects resulting in publications, exhibitions, educational initiatives, and multimedia products. The fellowship program provides access to the Smithsonian’s vast artifact and archival collections, as well as to the expertise of the Institution’s research staff. The Center offers fellowships to scholars and professionals who are pre- or postdoctoral candidates or who have completed advanced professional training. Fellowships are awarded for a maximum of ten weeks and carry a prorated stipend. Fellows are expected to reside in the Washington, D.C. area, to participate in the Center’s activities, and to make presentations on their work to colleagues at the museum. Researchers are required to consult with the Fellowship Coordinator prior to submitting a proposal. Visit the Lemelson Center Fellows Program webpage for more information.

  • NASA Fellowship in Aerospace History

    The American Historical Association will annually fund at least one Fellow, for one academic year, to undertake a research project related to aerospace history. It will provide a Fellow with an opportunity to engage in significant and sustained advanced research in all aspects of the history of aerospace from the earliest human interest in flight to the present, including cultural and intellectual history, economic history, history of law and public policy, and the history of science, engineering, and management. Applicants must possess a doctorate degree in history or in a closely related field, or be enrolled as a student (having completed all coursework) in a doctoral degree-granting program. The Fellowship term is for a period of at least six months, but not more than one year. The Fellow will be expected to devote the term entirely to the proposed research project. The Fellow will have (and be encouraged to take advantage of) the opportunity to use the documentary resources of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and may also spend the Fellowship in residence at the NASA headquarters or one of the NASA centers. The stipend is $20,000 for a 6–9 month fellowship. This amount is adjustable to the length of the fellowship term. Funds may not be used to support tuition or fees. A Fellow may not hold other major fellowships or grants during the fellowship term, except sabbatical and supplemental grants from their own institutions, and small grants from other sources for specific research expenses. Sources of anticipated support must be listed in the application form. Last year, applications and letters of recommendation had to have been postmarked by March 1st. Visit the NASA Fellowship in Aerospace History webpage for more information.