University of Wisconsin–Madison

Funding for Jewish History

The external funding opportunities listed here are of particular interest to students in Jewish history.

  • Center for Jewish History Fellowship Program

    The Center for Jewish History (CJH) composed of its five partners—the American Jewish Historical Society, American Sephardi Federation, Leo Baeck Institute, Yeshiva University Museum, YIVO Institute for Jewish Research—offers fellowships that are intended for Ph.D. candidates. The awards support original research at the Center for Jewish History in the field of Jewish Studies. Preference will be given to those candidates who draw on the library and archival resources of more than one partner. Full fellowships carry a stipend of up to $12,500 for a period of one academic year. It is expected that applicants will have completed all requirements for the doctoral degree except for the dissertation (ABD). It is required that each fellow chosen for the award:

    • Conduct research for the duration of the award at a minimum of 2 days/week in the Lillian Goldman Reading Room using the archival and library resources. Please note that the Center reserves the right to withhold stipends from fellows who do not fulfill the attendance commitment.
    • Participate in a Center for Jewish History Seminar and deliver a minimum of one lecture (during or beyond the grant period) based on research at the Center and the collections used; or participate in exhibition planning (for curatorial fellows only).

    Non-USA citizens must have the appropriate visa in order to accept the award, and so hold that visa for the duration of the award. Applications are usually due on February 1st. Visit the Center for Jewish History Fellowship Program webpage for more information.

  • Leo Baeck Institute for the Study of the History & Culture of German-Speaking Jewry (U.S. and Germany—MA and Research)

    LBI and DAAD Fellowships – The LBI and the DAAD announce the availability of two fellowships per year for doctoral students affiliated with an accredited U.S. institution of higher education or recent Ph.D.’s. They provide financial assistance to students for dissertation research work and to academics for writing a scholarly essay or book. Extensive use of LBI New York resources is to aid research projects falling within the field of study served by the LBI, namely the social, communal and intellectual history of German-speaking Jewry. The fellowship consists of a stipend of $2000, paid in two installments of $1000, and is normally used within one calendar year. Support for travel or family members is not available. Applicants must be US citizens, and Ph.D. candidates or recent Ph.D’s who have received their degrees within the preceding two years.

    The LBI and the DAAD also announce the availability of one six- month, or two three-month graduate felllowship(s) per year for doctoral students or academics affiliated with an accredited U.S. institution of higher education. The fellowship is to provide financial assistance to doctoral students doing research for their dissertation and to academics in the preparation of a scholarly essay or book that requires a period of research in libraries, archives or research institutions in the Federal Republic of Germany. The research must be in the field of study served by the LBI, i.e. the social, communal and intellectual history of German-speaking Jewry. The fellowship consists of a monthly stipend of up to EUR 975.00 (depending on level of academic advancement) to cover expenses during the time abroad. The tenure of the fellowship must fall within the period July through January. Support for travel is a one-time lump sum of EUR 520.00. Support for family members is not available. The stipend will be paid in monthly installments after arrival in the Federal Republic of Germany. Applicants must be US citizens, and Ph.D. candidates or recent Ph.D.s. who have received their degrees within the preceding two years.

    Fritz Halbers Fellowship – The LBI announces the availability of one or more fellowship per year for students enrolled in a Ph.D. program at an accredited institution of higher education. The fellowships provide financial assistance to scholars whose research projects are connected with the culture and history of German-speaking Jewry. The fellowship(s) consists of an award, not exceeding $ 3000–, to be determined according to the requirements of the project. The fellowship should be used by the end of the year in which it was granted. Support for travel or family members is not available. Applications for the fellowship must be submitted in writing to the Director not later than November 1st. Decisions will be announced in January.

    Fred Grubel Fellowship – The LBI announces the availability of a paid summer internship program for a graduate student who will participate in work on a specific research topic (jointly determined by the candidate and the LBI) related to LBI collections, which can include archives, library, photo collection, and art collection. The research project should pertain to the lives of refugees of the 1930s and 1940s in New York. The fellow will be supervised by the director of research and will work on a day-to-day basis with archives and library staff. Ph.D. candidates from history, sociology, literature, or Jewish studies programs are eligible. The compensation is $1,500 per month. The deadline for applications is the fall of the year prior to the summer internship. Decisions will be made in early spring.

    Visit the Leo Baeck Fellowships webpage for more information on any of these awards.

  • The Foundation for Jewish Culture’s Maurice and Marilyn Cohen Fund for Doctoral Dissertation Fellowships (Write Up)

    These fellowships encourage scholarly research, publication and teaching in the various disciplines of Jewish studies. Established in 1960, they have been awarded to nearly 600 scholars, including many leaders in the field. The fellowships apply to one academic year and are toward the completion of a dissertation, typically in the fifth year of study. Applicants are expected to have finished all doctoral requirements, except for the thesis, and should show evidence of being able to complete their thesis within the fellowship year. The Foundation currently awards five Fellowships at $16,000 per grant Applicants must be citizens or permanent residents of the United States or Canada. International students cannot be granted fellowships at this time. A strong preference is given to individuals preparing for academic careers in Jewish studies, and to those who indicate that they will pursue a career in the United States. Visit the Foundation for Jewish Culture Fellowship webpage for more information.

  • Memorial Foundation for Jewish Culture

    The International Doctoral Scholarship for Studies Specializing in Jewish Fields aims to help train qualified individuals for careers in Jewish scholarship and research, and to help Jewish educational, religious, and communal workers obtain advanced training for leadership positions. Grants range up to $10,000 a year and can be renewed for up to four years. Only dissertators are eligible. All applications are due by October 31st. Visit the Memorial Foundation for Jewish Culture webpage for more information.

  • US Holocaust Museum’s Residential Research Fellowship (Research and Write Up)

    The Center awards fellowships to support significant research and writing about the Holocaust. Awards are granted on a competitive basis. The Center welcomes proposals from scholars in all relevant disciplines including history, political science, literature, Jewish studies, philosophy, religion, psychology, comparative genocide studies, law and others. Fellowships are awarded to candidates working on their dissertations (ABD), postdoctoral researchers, and senior scholars. Applicants must be affiliated with an academic and/or research institution when applying for a fellowship. Immediate post-docs and faculty between appointments will also be considered. The specific fellowship and the length of the award are at the discretion of the Center. Individual awards generally range up to nine months of residency. A minimum tenure of three consecutive months is required. Fellowships of five months or longer have proven most effective. Stipends range up to $3,500 per month. Residents of the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area receive a modified stipend and term of residency at the Center. All awards include a stipend to offset the cost of direct travel to and from Washington, D.C., and visa assistance if necessary. Fellows are responsible for securing their own housing accommodations and health insurance. The Center does not provide support allowances for accompanying family members. The Museum provides work space and access to a computer, telephone, facsimile machine, and photocopier. Cost-sharing by home institutions or other relevant organizations is encouraged to extend the residency of the applicant at the Museum or to make possible additional research at other institutions in the Unites States and abroad. The deadline for fellowship applications is November of each year. Awards are announced the following April. The application can be found at the US Holocaust Museum’s Residential Research Fellowship webpage.