University of Wisconsin–Madison

Europe – Early and Late Modern

General Awards

  • American Historical Association’s Bernadotte Schmitt Grant (Research)

    These grants provide modest grants to support research in the history of Europe, Africa, and Asia. The funds for this program come from the earnings of a bequest from Bernadotte E. Schmitt, president of the Association in 1960. Only members of the American Historical Association are eligible to apply. Individual grants will not exceed $1,000, and the money is intended to further research in progress and may be used for travel to a library or archive, for microfilms, photographs, or photocopying—a list of purposes that is meant to be merely illustrative, not exhaustive. Preference will be given to those with specific research needs, such as the completion of a project or completion of a discrete segment thereof. Preference will also be given to Ph.D. candidates and junior scholars. The deadline is usually in February. Mailed and faxed submissions are not accepted. Visit the Bernadotte Schmitt Grant webpage for more information.

  • American Catholic Association’s John Tracy Ellis Dissertation Award (Research or Write Up)

    The John Tracy Ellis Dissertation Award, which carries a purse of $1,200, memorializes the scholarship and teaching of Monsignor Ellis (1905-1992). Its purpose is to assist a graduate student working on some aspect of the history of the Catholic Church. The eleventh annual award will be announced at the Association’s eighty-ninth meeting, which will be held in New York City, on January 2-5, 2009. Those wishing to enter the competition for the award must be citizens or authorized residents (i.e., permanent residents or on student visas) of the United States or Canada, and must be enrolled in a doctoral program at a reception at a recognized institution of higher education. Applications are due to the Secretary of the Association in September. Visit the John Tracy Ellis Dissertation Award webpage for application details.

  • CLIR-Mellon Fellowships for Dissertation Research in Original Sources

    The Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) is pleased to offer fellowships funded by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation for dissertation research in the humanities in original sources. The purposes of this fellowship program are to help junior scholars in the humanities and related social-science fields gain skill and creativity in developing knowledge from original sources; enable dissertation writers to do research wherever relevant sources may be, rather than just where financial support is available; encourage more extensive and innovative uses of original sources in libraries, archives, museums, historical societies, and related repositories in the U.S. and abroad; and provide insight from the viewpoint of doctoral candidates into how scholarly resources can be developed for access most helpfully in the future. The program offers about fifteen competitively awarded fellowships. Each provides a stipend of $2,000 per month for 9–12 months. Each fellow will receive an additional $1,000 upon participating in a symposium on research in original sources and submitting an acceptable report to CLIR on the research experience. Thus, the maximum award will be $25,000. Fellowships for the current cycle will begin between June 1st and September 1st, and end within 12 months of commencing. Fellows are expected to devote full time to their dissertation research without holding teaching or research assistantships or undertaking other paid work. Applicants may apply simultaneously for other fellowships, including Mellon awards, but fellows may not hold other fellowships simultaneously with CLIR’s. Fellows may use stipends to meet living expenses, travel costs, and other expenses that enable dissertation research to be carried out, but not to defray tuition. The next round of applications will begin in September. Visit the CLIR-Mellon Fellowships for Dissertation Research in Original Sources webpage for more information.

  • Council for European Studies Pre-Dissertation Fellowship (MA and Research)

    To be eligible for this award, applicants must fulfill four criteria. First, the CES Fellowship is intended to fund students’ first major research project in Europe. Students who have already engaged in extensive field work and study in Europe, related to their dissertation, are not eligible. Second, applicants must be in the exploratory, early stage of their research. Third, applicants are expected to have finished at least a majority of their doctoral coursework. Fourth, applicants must be currently enrolled in a doctoral program at a university that is a member of the Council’s academic consortium. The Fellowship Committee takes a broad interpretation of European Studies, setting no specific parameters regarding period or discipline. Applicants of all disciplines pursuing research relevant to European Studies are encouraged to apply. European Studies include both continental and non-continental Europe (and also includes studies that place European topics in global contexts or consider transcontinental projects). Applicants from the past have pursued doctorates in a range of fields from art history to political science to anthropology. Fellowship sponsors three components:

    • $4,000 covering a two-month stay abroad, during which time fellows have the opportunity to pursue original archival and field research
    • Fellows’ travel and accommodation at the CES International Conference, where they present their findings and receive feedback from senior scholars
    • Publication of fellows’ research reports in the CES journal, the European Studies Forum.

    Visit the Council for European Studies Pre-Dissertation Fellowship webpage for more information.

  • Dissertation Proposal Development Fellowship

    This award is open to second-and-third-year graduate students in the humanities and social sciences undertaking doctoral dissertation research. The deadline to apply is usually in January. Please visit the Dissertation Proposal Development Fellowship webpage for more information.

  • Foreign Language Area Studies Fellowship Program (MA)

    The FLAS program provides academic year and summer fellowships to assist graduate students in foreign language and either area or international studies. Students apply students apply through the relevant area studies institute on campus. The award covers tuition, fees, and a stipend. Application deadlines vary according to center. Visit the Foreign Language Area Studies Fellowship webpage for more information.

  • Friends of the Princeton University Library Research Grants

    Each year, the Friends of the Princeton University Library offer short-term Library Research Grants to promote scholarly use of the research collections. The Program in Hellenic Studies also supports a limited number of Library Research Grants in Hellenic studies, and the Cotsen Children’s Library supports research in its collection on aspects of children’s books. The Maxwell Fund supports research on materials dealing with Portuguese-speaking cultures. These Library Research Grants, which have a value of up to $2,500 each, are meant to help defray expenses incurred in traveling to and residing in Princeton during the tenure of the grant. The length of the grant will depend on the applicant’s research proposal, but is ordinarily one month. Visit the Friends of the Princeton University Library Research Grants webpage for more information.

  • The Fulbright-IIE Student Program (Research)

    This money is for students entering the research phase of their dissertations. They must apply through the International Fellowships Office at UW. Erin Crawley, the Fellowships Officer, is the contact person at the International Fellowships Office. The internal UW deadline is usually September 15th. Visit the The Fulbright-IIE Student Program webpage for more information.

  • The Fulbright Hayes Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad

    The Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad Fellowship Program provides opportunities for graduate students to engage in full-time dissertation research overseas in modern foreign languages and area studies. Students must apply through the International Fellowships Office at UW; the internal UW deadline is usually 10 days before the national deadline. Students may propose research for 6 to 12 months. The fellowship, whose award varies depending on research and country, may not be renewed. Visit the Fulbright Hayes Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad webpage for more information.

  • Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation’s Dissertation Fellowships (Write Up)

    The Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation (HFG) welcomes proposals from any of the natural and social sciences and the humanities that promise to increase understanding of the causes, manifestations, and control of violence, aggression, and dominance. Highest priority is given to research that can increase understanding and amelioration of urgent problems of violence, aggression, and dominance in the modern world. Ten or more dissertation fellowships are awarded each year to individuals who will complete the writing of the dissertation within the award year. These fellowships of $15,000 each are designed to contribute to the support of the doctoral candidate to enable him or her to complete the thesis in a timely manner, and it is only appropriate to apply for support for the final year of Ph.D. work. Applications are evaluated in comparison with each other and not in competition with the postdoctoral research proposals. Applicants may be citizens of any country and studying at colleges or universities in any country.

    Particular questions that interest the foundation concern violence, aggression, and dominance in relation to social change, the socialization of children, intergroup conflict, interstate warfare, crime, family relationships, and investigations of the control of aggression and violence. Research with no useful relevance to understanding and attempting to cope with problems of human violence and aggression will not be supported, nor will proposals to investigate urgent social problems where the foundation cannot be assured that useful, sound research can be done. Priority will also be given to areas and methodologies not receiving adequate attention and support from other funding sources. Applications for dissertation fellowships must be received by February 1st for a decision in June. Visit the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation’s Dissertation Fellowships webpage for more information.

  • Humane Studies Fellowships

    The Institute for Humane Studies awards scholarships up to $12,000 for undergraduate or graduate study in the United States or abroad. Last year IHS awarded 120 scholarships to outstanding undergraduate, graduate, law, and professional students who are exploring the principles, practices, and institutions necessary to a free society through their academic work. The deadline is usually December 31st; recommendation letters must be submitted by mid-January. Visit the Humane Studies Fellowships webpage for more information.

  • The Jennings Randolph Peace Scholar Dissertation Program (Research)

    The JR Program for International Peace awards nonresidential Peace Scholar Dissertation Fellowships to students at U.S. universities who are writing doctoral dissertations on topics related to peace, conflict, and international security. Each year the program awards approximately ten Peace Scholar Fellowships. Fellowships last for 12 months starting in September. Fellowships are open to citizens of any country. Dissertation projects in all disciplines are welcome, though proposals should be consistent with the Institute’s mandate and present a research agenda with clear relevance to policy issues. Historical topics are appropriate if they promise to shed light on contemporary issues. Area studies projects and single case studies will be competitive if they focus on conflict and its resolution, apply to other regions and cases, or both. Peace Scholar Awards are currently set at $20,000 per year, are paid directly to the individual, and may not be deferred. They generally may not be combined with any other major award or fellowship except in special circumstances and with the written approval of the Institute. Peace Scholars carry out their fellowship work at their universities or other sites appropriate to their research, are expected to devote full attention to their work and provide periodic reports to the Institute, and may be invited to give a presentation at the Institute. Visit the Jennings Randolph Peace Scholar Dissertation Program webpage for more information.

  • Miriam U. Chrisman Travel Fellowship (Religious History—Research)

    The Society for Reformation research offers the Miriam U. Chrisman Travel Fellowship of $1500 every other year in odd numbered years (2003, 2005, etc.) to graduate students who need to travel abroad to do research on their doctoral dissertations. The award competition is open to all students of European history, 1450-1650, whose topics deal with religious history in some way. Students working on southern Europe are eligible as are those working on northern Europe; topics dealing with Catholicism or minority religions are as welcome as topics in Reformation studies. The purpose of the award is to help defray the expenses of working abroad. The deadline for submission is February 1st of the year in which the award is to be made (2009, 2011, etc.). Visit the Miriam U. Chrisman Travel Fellowship webpage for more information.

  • NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program

    For those whose research interests tends towards the social scientific end, various awards are available through the National Science Foundation. The Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP) provides three years of support for graduate study leading to research-based master’s or doctoral degrees and is intended for students who are in the early stages of their graduate study. The Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP) invests in graduate education for a cadre of diverse individuals who demonstrate their potential to successfully complete graduate degree programs in disciplines relevant to the mission of the National Science Foundation. Visit the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program webpage for more information on registration and applications.

    Visit the National Science Foundation website to search the full catalog of funding opportunities he NSF provides.

  • The Resident Scholars Program (Anthropological Methods—Write Up)

    The School for Advanced Research (SAR) awards approximately six Resident Scholar Fellowships each year to scholars who have completed their research and analysis and who need time to think and write about topics important to the understanding of humankind. Resident scholars may approach their research from the perspective of anthropology or from anthropologically informed perspectives in such fields as history, sociology, art, law, and philosophy. Both humanistically and scientifically oriented scholars are encouraged to apply. SAR provides Resident Scholars with low-cost housing and office space on campus, a stipend up to $40,000, library assistance, and other benefits during a nine-month tenure, from September 1st through May 31st. SAR Press may consider books written by resident scholars for publication in its Resident Scholar Series. Four types of fellowships are available:

    Weatherhead Fellowships
    Two fellowships are available for either Ph.D. candidates or scholars with doctorates whose work is either humanistic or scientific in nature.

    SAR Fellowships
    Up to two fellowships are available for either Ph.D. candidates or scholars with doctorates whose work is either humanistic or scientific in nature.

    Katrin H. Lamon Fellowship
    One fellowship is available for a Native American scholar, either pre- or post-doctoral, working in either the humanities or the sciences.

    Anne Ray Fellowship
    One fellowship is available for an established Native American scholar, working in the humanities, arts, or the sciences, who has a commitment to providing mentorship to recent Native graduates or graduate students. In addition to working on their own research, the Anne Ray Resident Scholar serves as a mentor to two Native interns working at the Indian Arts Research Center.

    In addition, SAR is interested in hosting exceptional scholars who have received funding through the following programs: Ford Foundation Diversity Fellowships, Mellon/ACLS Recent Doctoral Recipients Fellowships, and Visiting Fulbright Scholar fellowships. Applicants to these non-SAR fellowship programs whose research is consistent with SAR’s mission may be able to join the School’s dynamic intellectual community for the duration of their fellowship. Visit the Resident Scholars Program webpage for more information.

  • Smith Richardson Foundation’s World Politics and Statecraft Fellowship (Research)

    The Smith Richardson Foundation is pleased to announce a new annual grant competition to support Ph.D. dissertation research on American foreign policy, international relations, international security, strategic studies, area studies, and diplomatic and military history. The fellowship’s objective is to support the research and writing of policy-relevant dissertations through funding of fieldwork, archival research, and language training. In evaluating applications, the Foundation will accord preference to those projects that could directly inform U.S. policy debates and thinking, rather than dissertations that are principally focused on abstract theory or debates within a scholarly discipline. The Foundation will award up to twenty grants of $7,500 each. Visit the Smith Richardson Foundation webpage for more information, including application instructions.

  • SSRC Dissertation Proposal Development Fellowship (MA)

    This award is open to second-and-third-year graduate students in the humanities and social sciences undertaking doctoral dissertation research. The deadline to apply is usually in January. Please visit the Dissertation Proposal Development Fellowship webpage for more information.

  • SSRC-Mellon Mays Graduate Initiatives Program (MA and Research)

    The SSRC-Mellon Mays Graduate Initiatives Program offers three grants designed to meet specific needs during the doctoral degree process, two for pre-dissertators and the third for dissertators. Fellows may apply for one grant during each grant cycle. The total of the GSE and PRD grants may not exceed $5,000 during the years of eligibility.

    • The Pre-doctoral Research Development (PRD) grant is available to second through fifth year students. It may be used for small scale, preliminary research and other activities that support the early investigation of data sources, field sites, data sets and archival materials. The PRD is subject to a $3,000 maximum and may be received one time.
    • The Graduate Studies Enhancement (GSE) grant is available to second through fifth year students. It may be used to defer the cost of conference travel, equipment, books, journal subscriptions, software and other necessary supplies. The GSE is subject to a $1,500 annual maximum and may be received four times.

    SSRC-Mellon Mays Graduate Initiatives Programs are open only to those who were Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellows. Applications are usually accepted from May 1st to November 1st. Visit the Mellon Mays Grants webpage for more information.

    SSRC International Dissertation Research Fellowship (Research)

    The IDRF program supports distinguished graduate students in the humanities and social sciences conducting dissertation research outside the United States. Seventy-five fellowships will be awarded in 2009 with funds provided by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. The IDRF program is committed to empirical and site-specific research that advances knowledge about non-U.S. cultures and societies (involving fieldwork, research in archival or manuscript collections, or quantitative data collection). The program promotes research that is situated in a specific discipline and geographical region and is engaged with interdisciplinary and cross-regional perspectives. Fellowships will provide support for nine to twelve months of dissertation research. Individual awards will be approximately $20,000. No awards will be made for proposals requiring less than nine months of on-site research. Visit the International Dissertation Research Fellowships webpage for further detail on these and other individual awards.

  • SSRC-Mellon Mays Dissertation Completion Grant (Write Up)

    The DCG, available only for the 2008-9 cycle, is available to fellows beyond the fifth year of graduate study. It may be used to defer the cost of conference travel, equipment, books, journal subscriptions, software, and other activities that support the investigation of data sources, field sites, data sets and archival materials. The DCG is subject to a $2,500 maximum and may be received one time.

    Applications are generally accepted from May 1st to November 1st. Visit the Mellon Mays website for more information.

  • Society of Architectural Historians Fellowships (Research)

    Samuel H. Kress Foundation Dissertation Fellowship
    In a joint program with the Samuel H. Kress Foundation, the Society of Architectural Historians presents a $15,000 dissertation fellowship to support dissertation research on the history of architecture and the built environment in Europe from ancient times through 1800. The subject area can include architectural, interior and landscape design, preservation and urban planning in Europe. The fellowship will support travel and research and will recognize important contributions to knowledge both in uncovering new sources and/or in proffering innovative research and framing of issues. The Kress Dissertation Fellowship will be awarded to one doctoral candidate, regardless of gender, nationality, race or ethnicity, from a U.S. institution of higher learning that grants Ph.D.s in the history, theory, criticism or preservation of architecture. Restrictions: research must focus on European architecture before 1850; applicants must be U.S. citizens or individuals matriculated at an American university; candidates must be nominated by their university department; applicants will be expected to have completed all requirements for their doctorate except for their dissertation by June 15th; the award cannot be used toward university tuition and fees; candidates cannot hold another Kress Fellowship simultaneously with this fellowship; and membership in the Society of Architectural Historians is not required, but strongly recommended. The deadline is usually in January.

    The Society also grants more than two dozen fellowships each year to help advanced graduate students, emerging scholars, and senior scholars participate in host of SAH activities including delivering papers at the SAH Annual Meeting and participating in the Study Tours. Many of the fellowships must be newly funded each year. The Rosann S. Berry Fellowship Fund enables an advanced graduate student who is delivering a paper at the SAH annual meeting to defray their meeting costs. The recipient receives a $500 travel stipend and complimentary meeting registration. The Fellowship was named in honor of Rosann Berry, who managed the Society for nearly two decades. The Spiro Kostof Fellowship Fund enables an advanced graduate student who is delivering a paper at the SAH annual meeting to defray their meeting costs. The recipient receives a $500 travel stipend and complimentary meeting registration. The award is named for the renowned historian of architecture and urbanism, Spiro Kostof.

    Visit the Society of Architectural Historians Fellowships webpage to learn more about all of these awards.

  • Society for the Scientific Study of Sexuality (SSSS) Grants

    Each year (SSSS) awards two grants of $1,000 each to students who are doing human sexuality research. The purpose of the research can be a master’s thesis or doctoral dissertation, but this is not a requirement. Applicants must be enrolled in a degree-granting program and a member (student) of SSSS. Deadlines For Submission of Applications are January 1st (the Spring award is issued in May) and June 1st of each year. Visit the Society for the Scientific Study of Sexuality Grants webpage for more information.

Eastern Europe

  • The American Council of Learned Societies

    ACLS Dissertation Fellowships
    These offer support for writing dissertations in East European studies in all disciplines of the humanities and the social sciences. Funding is offered for two types of support: Research Fellowships for use in Eastern Europe to conduct fieldwork or archival investigations; and Writing Fellowships for use in the United States, after all research is complete, to write the dissertation. Applications should be for work on Eastern Europe: Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Kosovo/a, Latvia, Lithuania, Macedonia, Montenegro, Poland, Romania, Serbia, Slovakia, and Slovenia. Applicants may propose comparative work considering more than one country of Eastern Europe or relating East European societies of those of other parts of the world. Fellowships will be granted on the basis of the scholarly potential of the applicant, the quality and scholarly importance of the proposed work, and its importance to the development of scholarship on Eastern Europe. Funds awarded may not be used in Western Europe. The stipend will be up to $18,000. As a condition of the award, the applicant’s home university will be required (consistent with its policies and regulations) to provide or to waive normal academic year tuition payments or to provide alternative cost-sharing support.

    Research and Writing Fellowships are intended as sequenced support for completion of a dissertation. Recipients are therefore invited to apply the following year for the next level of funding. Completed applications must be submitted through the ACLS Online Fellowship Application system, usually in November. Notifications will be sent in April. Visit the Dissertation Fellowships in East European Studies webpage for more information.

    Language Grants to Individuals for Summer Study
    ACLS will offer grants of up to $2,500 each for intensive summer study of Albanian, Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian, Bulgarian, Czech, Estonian, Hungarian, Latvian, Lithuanian, Macedonian, Polish, Romanian, Slovak, or Slovene. These awards are intended primarily for people who will use these languages in academic research or teaching. Applicants may request support for elementary, intermediate, or advanced language study, or for attendance at advanced-mastery language courses sponsored by ACLS. The application should specify the name of the institution they wish to attend, along with a statement of the significance of this training for their career plans. In most cases, proposals for beginning or intermediate level should be for attendance at intensive courses offered by institutions of higher education in the U.S., although, in exceptional cases, proposals for study in Eastern Europe will be considered. Proposals for study at the advanced level will ordinarily be for courses in Eastern Europe.

    Proposals for advanced-mastery language courses will be for courses sponsored by ACLS at U.S. institutions. These courses provide training in skills required for advanced fieldwork or archival research, or professional work in government agencies and non-governmental organizations. The skills may include, but are not limited to, translation, editing/copyediting, and advanced reading/sorting for relevance of specialized materials. The application deadline for the summer is usually in January. Visit the Language Grants to Individuals for Summer Study webpage for more information, including the application.

  • American Councils for International Education Fellowships

    With funds from the U.S. Department of State (Title VIII), U.S. Department of Education (Fulbright Hays), and the National Endowment for the Humanities, American Councils administers several major grants for independent, overseas research in the humanities and social sciences. Both Ph.D. candidates and post-doctoral scholars are eligible to apply for research support. Applicants should plan to spend at least two to three months in the field, preferably longer. In recent years, American Councils scholars have conducted independent research in Albania, Azerbaijan, Armenia, Bulgaria, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Croatia, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova, Montenegro, Romania, Russia, Serbia, Tajikistan, Ukraine, and Uzbekistan. Awards applicable to grad students include:

    • Advanced Russian Language and Area Studies Program (RLASP) – American Councils’ longest-running study abroad program provides intensive Russian-language immersion for US undergraduate and graduate students in Russia. The summer deadline is March 1st, the Fall and academic year deadline is April 1st, and the Spring deadline is October 1st.
    • Eurasian Regional Language Program – Provides graduate students, advanced undergraduates, scholars, and professionals the unique opportunity to study the languages of the independent states of the former Soviet Union in an overseas, immersion setting for a summer, semester or academic year. The summer deadline is March 1st, the Fall and academic year deadline is April 1st, and the Spring deadline is October 1st.
    • Title VIII Combined Research and Language Training Program – Provides full support for research and approximately ten hours per week of advanced language instruction for three to nine months in Russia, Central Asia, the South Caucasus, Ukraine, Belarus, and Moldova.
    • Title VIII Research Scholar Program – Provides full support for three to nine-month research trips to Russia, Central Asia, the South Caucasus, Ukraine, Belarus, and Moldova.
    • Title VIII Southeastern Europe Language Program – This program provides fellowships for graduate students, faculty, and scholars to study language for a semester, academic year or summer in Albania, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Macedonia, Montenegro, Romania, and Serbia.
    • Title VIII Southeastern Europe Research Program – This program provides fellowships for graduate students, faculty and scholars to conduct field research for a semester, academic year or summer in Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Macedonia, Montenegro, Romania, and Serbia.

    Please contact Outbound Programs at outbound@americancouncils.org for future deadlines. Visit the American Councils for International Education Fellowships webpage for more information on all of the aforementioned awards.

  • Critical Language Scholarships for Intensive Summer Institutes (Russia—MA)

    Sponsored by the United States Department of State, Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs and administered by the Council of American Overseas Research Centers, the Critical Language Scholarships Program was launched in 2006. In its inaugural year, the Program offered intensive overseas study in the critical need foreign languages of Arabic, Bangla/Bengali, Hindi, Punjabi, Turkish and Urdu. In 2007, Chinese, Korean, Persian, and Russian institutes were added along with increased student capacity in the inaugural language institutes.

    The Program is part of the National Security Language Initiative (NSLI), a U.S. government interagency effort to expand dramatically the number of Americans studying and mastering critical need foreign languages. Scholarship recipients – U.S. citizen undergraduate, Master’s and Ph.D. students and recent graduates – receive funding to participate in beginning, intermediate and advanced level summer language programs at American Overseas Research Centers and affiliated partners. Recipients are expected to continue their language study beyond the scholarship period and later apply their critical language skills in their professional careers. Applications are usually due in January. Go to the Critical Language Scholarships for Intensive Summer Institutes webpage for more details.

  • IERES Mellon Pre-doctoral Fellowship in Contemporary History (Write Up)

    The George Washington University’s Institute for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies (IERES) announced in May a new Mellon Pre-doctoral Fellowship in Contemporary History for 2008-2009, pending confirmation of funding. Applicants need to have completed archival research for their dissertation in two or more countries and be at the final writing stage of their dissertation. The Fellow must be in residence at IERES from September through June and will be provided with an office and computer. The deadline is in June.

    Visit the IERES webpage for more information.

  • IREX Individual Advanced Research Opportunities (IARO) (Eurasia—MA and Research)

    The Individual Advanced Research Opportunities (IARO) program seeks to attract, select, and support in-depth field research by US students, scholars, and experts in policy-relevant subject areas related to Southeast Europe and Eurasia, as well as to disseminate knowledge about these regions to a wide network of constituents in the United States and abroad. Sponsored by the US Department of State’s Title VIII Program and IREX’s own Scholar Support Fund, the IARO program provides fellows with the means and support necessary to conduct in-country research on contemporary political, economic, historical, or cultural developments relevant to US foreign policy (limited funds are available for non-policy related fields). The IARO program plays a vital role in supporting the emergence of a dedicated and knowledgeable cadre of US scholars and experts who can enrich the US understanding of developments in Southeast Europe and Eurasia. Grants are available for both MA—one to three months—and PhD students—two to nine months. Visit the Individual Advanced Research Opportunities webpage for more information.

  • Kathryn Davis Fellowships for Peace (MA)

    Middlebury College is pleased to announce The Kathryn Davis Fellowships for Peace. For the third year in a row, 100 Davis Fellowships are offered to cover the full cost of summer language study from beginner to graduate levels in Arabic, Chinese, Hebrew, Japanese, Portuguese, and Russian at the Middlebury College Language Schools. Fellowship grants cover the full comprehensive fee (tuition, room, and board) at the Middlebury summer Language Schools, plus a stipend to assist in defraying program-related expenses. The Davis Fellowships are merit-based and intended for exceptionally qualified individuals with interest in one or more of the following areas: international, global, or area studies, international politics and economics, peace and security studies, and/or conflict resolution. All applications are usually due in February. Visit Kathryn Davis Fellowships for Peace for application instructions.

  • The Kosciuszko Foundation (Poland—MA and Research)

    Tuition Scholarship Program
    Kosciuszko Foundation Tuition Scholarships support American students of Polish descent for full-time graduate studies in the United States, the one-year Master’s program at the Center for European Studies, Jagiellonian University, Cracow, and English Schools of Medicine in Poland. Funding for any major. Scholarships range from $1,000 to $7,000.

    Only United States citizens and permanent residents of Polish descent who are beginning or continuing graduate studies are eligible. This is for full-time studies only. United States citizens of non-Polish descent are considered when their studies are primarily focused on Polish studies. The deadline are usually in January; notifications are in May.

    Graduate Study and Research in Poland Scholarship
    This scholarship supports graduate level research at universities in Poland by American graduate students and university faculty members with funding from the Polish Ministry of Education and Sports and the Kosciuszko Foundation. Research projects may be conducted from October through June at Polish universities and institutions which fall under the jurisdiction of the Polish Ministry of Education and Sports. The scholarship provides a stipend for dormitory housing and living expenses . Transportation to and from Poland is not included. This scholarship does not include tuition to attend classes at Polish universities. US citizens and Polish citizens with permanent residency status in the US who are graduate level students and who possess proficiency in the Polish language are eligible. Applications forms are available from October through December 30th; they are usually due in mid-January.

    Summer Studies Abroad
    Kosciuszko Foundation Summer Study Abroad programs are open to: high school graduates who will be 18 years old by the first day of their chosen program, undergraduate and graduate students; and adults who have an interest in studying Polish. Previous knowledge of the Polish language is not required. Applications are in the Spring.

    Visit the Kosciuszko Foundation website for more information on all of these funding opportunities.

  • National Security Education Program's David L. Boren Graduate Fellowships (MA)

    The NSEP David L. Boren Fellowships enable U.S. graduate students to add an important international and language component to their graduate education through specialization in area study, language study, or increased language proficiency. NSEP supports students studying languages, cultures, and world regions other than Western Europe, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. Boren Fellowships are intended to support U.S. graduate students who will pursue the study of languages and cultures deemed critical to U.S. national security, and who are highly motivated by the opportunity to work in the federal government.

    Fellowships enable both masters and doctoral level students representing a broad range of academic and professional disciplines to add a significant language and international dimension to their curricula. Students already enrolled in internationally oriented programs are encouraged to intensify their study of areas, languages, and cultures through overseas study and domestic tuition support.

    Applications will be available in August. Go to the David L. Boren Fellowships webpage for more information.

  • REEC’s Summer Research Laboratory at UI-Urbana-Champaign

    The Summer Research Laboratory (SRL) on Russia, Eastern Europe, and Eurasia (SRL) provides scholars access to the resources of the University of Illinois Slavic and East European Library; an opportunity to seek advice from the librarians of the Slavic Reference Service (SRS); and specialized workshops for graduate students and junior scholars. During the first four weeks of the Lab, the Russian, East European, and Eurasian Center also organizes conferences, evening films, noontime speakers, and social events for Lab associates. For graduate students, it provides an opportunity to conduct research prior to going abroad for dissertation research or as they are working on their dissertation. During the last application cycle, deadlines for all grant applications are usually due April 15th. Visit the REEC’s Summer Research Laboratory webpage for application procedures as they become available.

France

  • Chateaubriand Fellowship (Research)

    The Chateaubriand Fellowship is a grant offered by the Embassy of France in the United States. Every year, it allows doctorate students enrolled in American universities and post-doctorates to conduct research in France for up to 10 months for the Scientific fellowships and up to 12 months for the Humanities ans Social Sciences fellowships. Chateaubriand recipients receive a stipend, a round trip ticket to France and health insurance. The annual application deadline is usually in January. Visit the Chateaubriand Fellowship webpage for more information.

  • Institut Francais de Washington, Research Fellowships (Research)

    The Gilbert Chinard Research Fellowships, Harmon Chadbourn Rorison Fellowship and the Edourd Morot-Sir Fellowship in Literature provide each $1500 for research in France for a period of at least two months. Fields include French history and literature. A brief report to the Institute upon return is requested. Candidates are to be in the final year of their dissertation stage or have held the Ph.D. no longer than three years before the annual application deadline of January 15th. There is no application form. Applicants write two pages maximum describing research project and planned trip (location, length of stay, etc.), and include a curriculum vitae. A letter of recommendation from dissertation director is required for Ph.D. candidates and a letter from a specialist in the field for assistant professors. Visit the Institut Francais de Washington website for an application.

  • Mary Isabel Sibley Fellowship (Female Candidates—Research)

    The Mary Isabel Sibley Fellowship is available for women intending to pursue postgraduate research in humanities and is awarded alternately in the fields of Greek and French. The award may be used for the study of Greek language, literature, history or archaeology, or for the study of French language or literature. The Fellowship is awarded annually and has a stipend of $20,000. Candidates must be unmarried women between the 25 and 35 years of age (inclusive) who have demonstrated their ability to carry on original research. They must hold the doctorate or have fulfilled all the requirements for the doctorate except the dissertation, and they must be planning to devote full-time work to research during the Fellowship year. Applications will be available in the Fall and are due in January. Go to the Mary Isabel Sibley Fellowship webpage for more information.

  • Society for French Historical Studies

    John B. and Theta H. Wolf Travel Fellowship
    The John B. and Theta H. Wolf Travel Fellowship awards $2,000 annually to a doctoral student at a North American university for dissertation research in French history (any period). The winner will be announced at the annual meeting of the Society for French Historical Studies. The application must include the following:

    • A cover page
    • A description of the project, not to exceed five double-spaced pages
    • The applicant’s curriculum vitae
    • A one-page, double-spaced statement outlining the applicant’s career plans and explaining how the project will contribute to their fulfillment
    • Two confidential letters of recommendation, one from the applicant’s doctoral adviser and the other from a person who knows the applicant and is familiar with the proposed project
    • Transcripts of the applicant’s graduate work. Three copies of items 1-4 and one copy of items 5-6 must be submitted by January 1st to the chair of the committee.


    Marjorie M. Farrar Memorial Award

    This awards $2,750 to a doctoral student in French history at a North American university to support work on an outstanding dissertation in progress. The application must include the following:

    • A cover page
    • A description of the project, not to exceed five double-spaced pages
    • The applicant’s curriculum vitae
    • A one-page, double-spaced statement outlining the applicant’s career plans and explaining how the project will contribute to their fulfillment
    • Two confidential letters of recommendation, one from the applicant’s doctoral adviser and the other from a person who knows the applicant and is familiar with the proposed project
    • Transcripts of the applicant’s graduate work.

    Three copies of items 1-4 and one copy of items 5-6 must be submitted by 1 January. Send applications to the chair of the prize committee. Recipients of the Farrar Award will not be eligible for the John B. and Theta T. Wolf Travel Award.

    Visit the Society for French Historical Studies webpage for more information.

  • The National Huguenot Society

    The National Huguenot Society is pleased to award a prize of one thousand dollars ($1,000) in the spring of each year to the author of what is judged by the Awards Committee to be the best original work of scholarship covering any aspect of the Huguenot movement. The work may be in the form of a paper, article, thesis, dissertation, movie, video production, or book produced in the calendar year proceeding the announcement of the award. Visit the National Huguenot Society webpage for more information.

  • Newberry Library’s Fellowships (Research)

    Short Term Fellowships – Short-term fellowships are generally restricted to post-doctoral scholars, Ph.D. candidates, or holders of other terminal degrees from outside of the Chicago area who have a specific need for Newberry collections. The tenure of short-term fellowships varies from one week to two months, unless otherwise noted under the award description. A majority of fellowships will be for one month or less and, unless otherwise noted, the amount of the award is $1600 per month, pro-rated for shorter periods. Go to the Newberry Library’s Short Term Fellowships webpage for a list of available fellowships.

    École des Chartes Exchange Fellowship – This fellowship provides a monthly stipend and free tuition for an American or Canadian graduate student to study at the École Nationale des Chartes in Paris for a period of three months. The École des Chartes is the oldest institution in Europe specializing in the archival sciences, including paleography, bibliography, textual editing, and the history of the book. Preference will be given to students attending institutions that are members of the Center for Renaissance Studies Consortium. Applications are especially encouraged from students who are in the early stages of preparing their dissertations. Applications are usually due in January and are available at the École des Chartes Exchange Fellowship webpage.

  • SciencesPo Exchange Program (MA)

    As an international center of excellence in the social sciences, Sciences Po has established exchange partnerships with nearly 300 universities worldwide, of which UW Madison is one. Students from any of these partner universities can come to Sciences Po on an exchange program. The period of their stay at Sciences Po will be of one semester or one year. Exchange students will continue paying their fees at their home university and will usually get credits for marks obtained at Sciences Po. Visit the SciencesPo Exchange Program webpage for more information.

Germany

  • DAAD Scholarships (Research)

    Graduate students in social sciences, hard sciences, or in professional areas such as law, business, and medicine have particular needs for their research and study in Germany. DAAD can help you master the German language, complete a research project in Germany, or expand your education with a stay at a German university. The research grants are particularly relevant for graduate students. Applications for short-term grants are usually due August 1th; applications for 10-month grants and short-term grants are usually due November 15th; and applications for short-term grants are usually due May 15th. In future cycles only the November and May deadlines will apply. Be sure to apply at least five months before your projected research stay in Germany and not much more than a year ahead. Go to the DAAD Scholarships webpage for more details. For information on DAAD’s Intensive Language Courses in Germany, go to DAAD’s Courses webpage.

  • German Chancellor Fellowship for Prospective Leaders

    Submit an application if you are a prospective leader from the USA, the Russian Federation or the People’s Republic of China and, having completed your first degree (at least a Bachelor’s or comparable degree), have subsequently gained work experience and have already shown outstanding leadership potential in your career. A German Chancellor Fellowship allows you to carry out a project of your own design in cooperation with a German host you have selected. The program is under the patronage of the German Chancellor and also incorporates an intensive language course in Germany, a four-week introductory seminar in Bonn and Berlin, a study trip around Germany and a final meeting in Berlin. These activities provide additional insights into the social, cultural, economic and political life of Germany. Candidates from all professions and disciplines, but especially individuals in the humanities, law, social sciences and economics, are eligible to apply to the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation directly. The Humboldt Foundation grants up to ten German Chancellor Fellowships annually for prospective leaders from each of the three countries named. For applicants from the United States the application deadline is October 31st. For the application, visit the German Chancellor Fellowship for Prospective Leaders webpage.

  • German Historical Institute’s Research Grants (MA and Research)

    Doctoral and Postdoctoral Fellowships
    The GHI awards short-term fellowships to German and American doctoral students as well as post-doctoral scholars in the fields of German history, the history of German-American relations, and the history of the role of Germany and the USA in international relations. The fellowships are usually granted for periods of one to six months but, depending on the funds available, can be extended by one or more months. The research projects must draw upon primary sources located in the United States. The GHI will not provide funding for preliminary research, manuscript composition or the revision of manuscripts. It will give clear priority to those post-doc projects that are designed for the “second book”. The monthly stipend is approximately € 1,600 for doctoral students and € 2,800 for post-doctoral scholars. The deadlines for applications are usually in May and October. Visit the German Historical Institute’s Research Grants webpage for more information.

    GHI Fellowships at the Horner Library
    Together with the German Society of Pennsylvania, the German Historical Institute will sponsor two to four fellowships of up to four weeks for research at the Joseph Horner Memorial Library in Philadelphia between June 1st and July 15th. The fellowship will be awarded to Ph.D. and M.A. students and advanced scholars without restrictions in research fields or geographical provenance. The “GHI Fellowship at the Horner Library” will provide a travel subsidy and an allowance of $1,000 to $3,500 depending on the length of the stay and the qualifications of the fellows. Opportunities to research at other special collections in Philadelphia may be available.

    The Joseph Horner Memorial Library houses 70,000 volumes and is the largest German American collection outside of a university. The collection offers rich materials from the 17th to the 20th centuries to historians of German American immigration culture, especially in Pennsylvania, as well as historians of German fictional and non-fictional literature, including travel and popular literature. See the reference guide on the GHI web site and the catalog at the German Society of Pennsylvania. Applications (in English or German) should be made electronically to the GHI (c/o Christa Brown). They should include a project description of two pages, curriculum vitae, transcripts of academic degrees, and the name of at least one referee. Application deadline is usually March 1st.

  • Herzog August Bibliothek, Wolfenbuette (Research)

    Doctoral Fellowships
    Applicants may apply for a fellowship of either three or six months, if research on their dissertation topic necessitates the use of the Wolfenbüttel holdings. The fellowship is € 700 per month. The Foundations also pay the candidate’s rent in library accommodation for the duration of the fellowship. Travel costs cannot be refunded. In exceptional cases an extension of the fellowship may be granted. Application deadlines: 1st October or 1st April. The Board holds its selection meetings in February and July. Successful applicants can take up the award from 1st April or 1st October onwards each year.

    American Friends of the HAB Travel Grant
    The American Friends of the HAB offers travel grants of up to $1,500 to assist young North American students who are writing dissertations to gain access to the rich collections of the Herzog August Bibliothek. Students may either apply directly or be nominated by their doctoral advisers. The choice of successful applicants is made by the Executive Committee of the American Friends. Competition is open to US students in all the fields in which the HAB has significant holdings. The travel grant may be used for an exploratory first visit to Wolfenbüttel, in conjunction with a doctoral fellowship from the library, or to fund a return visit in the writing-up stage of a dissertation. The quickest and easiest way to submit applications is to contact by e-mail: Prof. Gerhild Scholz Williams (Washington University, St Louis) There are no deadlines.

    Herzog August Bibliothek website.

  • Newberry Library’s Fellowships (Research)

    Short Term Fellowships
    Short-term fellowships are generally restricted to post-doctoral scholars, Ph.D. candidates, or holders of other terminal degrees from outside of the Chicago area who have a specific need for Newberry collections. The tenure of short-term fellowships varies from one week to two months, unless otherwise noted under the award description. A majority of fellowships will be for one month or less and, unless otherwise noted, the amount of the award is $1600 per month, pro-rated for shorter periods. Go to Newberry Library’s Short Term Fellowships webpage for a list of available fellowships.

    École des Chartes Exchange Fellowship
    This fellowship provides a monthly stipend and free tuition for an American or Canadian graduate student to study at the École Nationale des Chartes in Paris for a period of three months. The École des Chartes is the oldest institution in Europe specializing in the archival sciences, including paleography, bibliography, textual editing, and the history of the book. Preference will be given to students attending institutions that are members of the Center for Renaissance Studies Consortium. Applications are especially encouraged from students who are in the early stages of preparing their dissertations. Applications are usually due in January and are available at the École des Chartes Exchange Fellowship webpage.

    Herzog August Bibliothek Wolfenbüttel Fellowship
    Applicants for long- and short-term fellowships at the Newberry may also ask to be considered for this joint fellowship providing an additional two-month fellowship in Wolfenbüttel, Germany. The proposed project should link the collections of both libraries; applicants should plan to hold both fellowships sequentially to ensure continuity of research. The award will pay 1,050 EUR per month plus up to 600 EUR for travel expenses. For more information on the Herzog August Bibliothek Wolfenbüttel, see their Web page at www.hab.de. Application deadlines usually in January.

Great Britain and Scandanavia

  • American-Scandinavian Foundation Fellowships (Research and Write Up)

    The ASF’s goal is to promote international understanding through educational and cultural exchange with Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. During the past 94 years, over 3,800 fellowships and grants have been given to Americans and Scandinavians engaged in study or research projects. US citizens and permanent residents may apply. Applicants must have completed their undergraduate degree by the start of their projects. A well-defined research project is required from all applicants. All candidates must have at least some ability in the language of the host country, even if it isn’t essential for the execution of the research plan. Fellowships are for about a year’s duration and preference is given to graduate students at the dissertation stage of their research. Awards can range as high as $23,000. The competition deadline is usually November 1st. Visit the American-Scandinavian Foundation Fellowships webpage for more information, including the application.

  • The Institute of Historical Research (MA and Research)

    Research Fellowships
    The Institute administers up to six Research Fellowships in History each year, tenable at the Institute, for PhD candidates who have already completed at least two years’ research on their chosen topic. The Fellowships funded by the Royal Historical Society are open to candidates without regard to nationality or academic affiliation.

    IHR Mellon Fellowships in the Humanities
    The Institute offers fellowships funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation for both pre-dissertation and dissertation research in the humanities using original sources. These fellowships aim to help doctoral candidates in the humanities who may otherwise not have opportunities or encouragement to work with original source materials in the United Kingdom; help doctoral candidates in the humanities to deepen their ability to develop knowledge from original sources; and provide insight from the viewpoint of doctoral candidates into how scholarly resources can be developed most helpfully in the future. The deadline for awards is usually in January.

    Visit the The Institute of Historical Research webpage for information covering both fellowships.

  • The North American Conference on British Studies (Research)

    NACBS Dissertation Year Fellowship – This money is awarded to support dissertation research in the British Isles on any topic of British (including Scottish, Irish and Imperial) history or British Studies. The Fellowship consists of a $6,000 stipend. The runner-up will receive a $2,000 travel grant. Each department may nominate one candidate, who should be a citizen or permanent resident of the United States or Canada, enrolled in a Ph.D. program in a U. S. or Canadian institution, and who has, at the time of application, completed all degree requirements save the dissertation. The following criteria have been established for the award: the nomination must be made by the student’s dissertation advisor, supported by one additional letter of recommendation; and the candidate must need to travel to the British Isles for the purpose of dissertation research. The awardee must conduct full-time research in the British Isles for a period of at least six months.

    NACBS-Huntington Library Fellowship Competition – The NACBS, in collaboration with the Huntington Library (California), offers aid in dissertation research in British Studies using the collections of the library. The amount of the fellowship is $2000. A requirement for holding the fellowship is that the time of tenure be spent in residence at the Huntington Library. The time of residence varies, but may be as brief as one month. Applicants must be U. S. or Canadian citizens or permanent residents and enrolled in a Ph.D. program in a U. S. or Canadian institution.

    Applications are usually due in November, and awards are announced in late January. Visit the Huntington Library Fellowship Competition webpage for more information.

  • UW Madison Graduate Student Scholarship at the University of Warwick

    As part of an exchange agreement, the University of Warwick offer awards for the academic year to University of Wisconsin-Madison students for study at the University of Warwick. Graduate students will follow an independent research program under the guidance of a Warwick senior faculty member. Applicants must be enrolled in a University of Wisconsin-Madison doctoral program; the competition is open to US citizens and international students. Preference will be given to dissertators. Graduate students who have not yet passed preliminary examinations for the Ph.D. also will be considered. The award is not tenable for use after a terminal Master’s Degree. Recipients purchase CISI insurance at a cost of about $300 for the year. There is also a fee for a UK entry visa. Personal funds may be needed in addition to the stipend to cover travel, accommodations, meals, books and incidentals. Recipients will have to purchase CISI insurance at a cost of about $300 for the year. There is also a fee for a UK entry visa. Free housing is possible for one of the scholars in the graduate residence dormitory, in exchange for services to the UW-Madison undergraduate study abroad program at Warwick. Interested candidates should apply to the Fellowships Office, 328 Ingraham Hall. The application deadline is usually in early March. For further information, please visit the International Institute’s Fellowship webpage.

Greece

  • American School of Classical Studies (ASCSA) Programs

    The Academic Year, or ‘Regular’ Program, runs from early September to early June and offers advanced graduate students from a variety of fields an intensive survey of the art, archaeology, history, and topography of Greece, from antiquity to the present. Students receive comprehensive training through visits to the principal archaeological sites and museums of Greece as well as seminars led by resident and visiting scholars. They also take part in the training program at the Corinth excavations. The School accepts 15 to 20 students in this program.

    The Summer Sessions, which run for two six-week periods each, are open to North American graduate and advanced undergraduate students and to high school and college instructors of classics and related fields. In these sessions, the School condenses its academic year program into an intensive introduction to the sites, museums, and monuments of Greece. The Summer programs are open to 20 participants each session.

  • The Council of American Overseas Research Centers Multi-Country Research Fellowship (Research)

    This program is open to U.S. doctoral candidates and scholars who have already earned their Ph.D. in fields in the humanities, social sciences, or allied natural sciences and wish to conduct research of regional or trans-regional significance. Fellowships require scholars to conduct research in more than one country outside of the United States, at least one of which hosts a participating American overseas research center. CAORC member centers to which fellows may affiliate include the American Academy in Rome; the American School of Classical Studies at Athens; the Center for Khmer Studies, and the Cyprus American Archaeological Research Institute. Given changing restrictions to many countries, applicants should contact CAORC before preparing a proposal.

    It is anticipated that approximately ten awards of up to $9,000 each will be given to scholars who wish to carry out research on broad questions of multi-country significance in the fields of humanities, social sciences, and related natural sciences. Fellowship tenure must be of at least 90 days duration, though that tenure need not be continuous. Fellows are required to obtain their own research permissions in countries that do not host centers. Doctoral candidates who have completed all Ph.D. requirements with the exception of the dissertation and established post-doctoral scholars are eligible to apply as individuals or in teams. Preference will be given to candidates examining comparative and/or cross-regional questions requiring research in two or more countries. All applicants must be U.S. citizens. For more information, visit the Multi-Country Research Fellowship webpage.

  • Mary Isabel Sibley Fellowship (Female Candidates—Research)

    The Mary Isabel Sibley Fellowship is available for women intending to pursue postgraduate research in humanities and is awarded alternately in the fields of Greek and French. The award may be used for the study of Greek language, literature, history or archaeology, or for the study of French language or literature. The Fellowship is awarded annually and has a stipend of $20,000. Candidates must be unmarried women between the 25 and 35 years of age (inclusive) who have demonstrated their ability to carry on original research. They must hold the doctorate or have fulfilled all the requirements for the doctorate except the dissertation, and they must be planning to devote full-time work to research during the Fellowship year. Applications will be available in the Fall and are due in January. Visit the Mary Isabel Sibley Fellowship webpage for more information.

Italy

  • The Council of American Overseas Research Centers Multi-Country Research Fellowship (Research)

    This program is open to U.S. doctoral candidates and scholars who have already earned their Ph.D. in fields in the humanities, social sciences, or allied natural sciences and wish to conduct research of regional or trans-regional significance. Fellowships require scholars to conduct research in more than one country outside of the United States, at least one of which hosts a participating American overseas research center. CAORC member centers to which fellows may affiliate include the American Academy in Rome; the American School of Classical Studies at Athens; the Center for Khmer Studies, and the Cyprus American Archaeological Research Institute. Given changing restrictions to many countries, applicants should contact CAORC before preparing a proposal.

    It is anticipated that approximately ten awards of up to $9,000 each will be given to scholars who wish to carry out research on broad questions of multi-country significance in the fields of humanities, social sciences, and related natural sciences. Fellowship tenure must be of at least 90 days duration, though that tenure need not be continuous. Fellows are required to obtain their own research permissions in countries that do not host centers. Doctoral candidates who have completed all Ph.D. requirements with the exception of the dissertation and established post-doctoral scholars are eligible to apply as individuals or in teams. Preference will be given to candidates examining comparative and/or cross-regional questions requiring research in two or more countries. All applicants must be U.S. citizens. For more information, visit the Multi-Country Research Fellowship webpage.

  • Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation Grants (Venice, Italy—Research)

    Grants will be awarded for historical research specifically on Venice and the former Venetian empire, and for study of contemporary Venetian society and culture. Disciplines of the humanities and social sciences are eligible areas of study, including but not limited to archaeology, architecture, art, bibliography, economics, history, history of science, law, literature, music, political science, religion, and theater. Applicants must (i) be citizens or permanent residents of the United States, (ii) have experience in advanced research at the graduate level or equivalent, and (iii) if graduate students, have fulfilled all doctoral requirements except completion of the dissertation (but including acceptance of dissertation proposal) by December 15th. Applications will be entertained for grants up to a maximum of $19,900 for a full academic year. Grants for the maximum amount are rarely awarded, and successful applicants are frequently awarded less than the amount requested. Funds are granted primarily for research in Venice and the Veneto only, and for transportation to, from, and within the Veneto. Scholars who have already received and accepted a Delmas grant for work in Venice and the Veneto are eligible to apply for one-time grants of up to $3,000 (one month maximum), to work exclusively on Venetian materials in other European libraries or museums. The proposed research must be related to the previous Delmas grant. Applicants may not submit funding requests for both grants within the same year. Funds may also be made available for aid in the publication of studies made possible by Delmas grants. Completed applications for grants must be received by the Foundation in December. Visit the Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation Grants webpage for more information, including application instructions.

  • The Rome Prize (Italy) (Research or Write Up)

    The American Academy in Rome accepts pre-doctoral applications for the Rome Prize in the following fields:

    • Ancient Studies (through the sixth century)
    • Medieval Studies (sixth through the 14th centuries)
    • Renaissance and Early Modern Studies (14th through the 18th centuries)
    • Modern Italian Studies (18th century to the present)

    The Academy offers 11-month and two-year pre-doctoral fellowships. Eleven-month awards are available in any of the fields listed above, and only to U.S. citizens; two-year awards are limited to projects in the history of art and architecture of any period. Pre-doctoral fellowships are meant to provide scholars with the necessary time to research and complete their doctoral dissertations. Applicants for pre-doctoral fellowships must have fulfilled all pre-dissertation requirements by the application deadline. Applicants for pre-doctoral fellowships are encouraged to consider whether their projects are at a stage and of such a nature that they would more profitably benefit from an 11-month or a two-year fellowship. Each Rome Prize winner is provided with a stipend, meals, a bedroom with private bath, and a study or studio. Those with children under 18 live in partially subsidized apartments nearby. Winners of 11-month fellowships receive stipends of $25,000. Fellowships generally begin at the Academy in early September and end in early August. Visit the Rome Prize webpage for more information.

Spain and Portugal

  • Kathryn Davis Summer Fellowships for Peace (MA)

    Middlebury College is pleased to announce The Kathryn Davis Fellowships for Peace. For the third year in a row, 100 Davis Fellowships are offered to cover the full cost of summer language study from beginner to graduate levels in Arabic, Chinese, Hebrew, Japanese, Portuguese, and Russian at the Middlebury College Language Schools. Fellowship grants cover the full comprehensive fee (tuition, room, and board) at the Middlebury summer Language Schools, plus a stipend to assist in defraying program-related expenses. The Davis Fellowships are merit-based and intended for exceptionally qualified individuals with interest in one or more of the following areas: international, global, or area studies, international politics and economics, peace and security studies, and/or conflict resolution. All applications are usually due in February. Visit Kathryn Davis Fellowships for Peace for application instructions.

  • University of Minnesota’s Program for Cultural Cooperation

    The program is designed to promote closer ties between scholarly Hispanicism in the U.S. in the areas of humanities, social sciences, and the cultural and academic developments of Spain. Projects oriented toward the dissemination of Spanish culture throughout the academic systems of the US are reviewed for subsidy. Priority is given to those proposals of high scholarly quality which will have an important impact upon the field of Hispanicism, both regionally and nationwide. As far as the history grad student is concerned, applications submitted by those who wish to undertake or complete research projects in Spain are considered. These academic investigations are evaluated on the basis of scholarly quality as well as relevance to the dissemination of Spanish culture in the US. The program only covers up to 50% of the cost. If you have no matching institutional funds, indicate that you will be covering the other 50% out of your own funds. Salaries are not subsidized, so do not list sabbatical salary as a matching fund. There is a maximum three month stay at the rate of approximately $3,700 per month that the program will cover. The Executive Committee meets once a year to review applications. The deadline for the receipt of applications is April 1st. Visit the University of Minnesota’s Program for Cultural Cooperation webpage for an application.