University of Wisconsin–Madison

Africa

Master's Phase

  • The CIC’s Foreign Language Enhancement Program

    The FLEP provides scholarships to help graduate students take advantage of language offerings not available at their home university, but available at another CIC member university (Big Ten plus University of Chicago). Scholarships are intended to cover living expenses incurred while attending another CIC host institution during the summer session. Visit the CIC’s Foreign Language Enhancement Program webpage for more information.

  • FLAS

    The FLAS program provides academic year and summer fellowships to assist graduate students in foreign language and either area or international studies. Students apply students apply through the relevant area studies institute on campus. The awards covers tuition, fees, and a stipend. Application deadlines vary according to center. Visit the FLAS Program webpage for more information.

  • National Security Education Program's David L. Boren Graduate Fellowships

    The NSEP David L. Boren Fellowships enable U.S. graduate students to add an important international and language component to their graduate education through specialization in area study, language study, or increased language proficiency. NSEP supports students studying languages, cultures, and world regions other than Western Europe, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. Boren Fellowships are intended to support U.S. graduate students who will pursue the study of languages and cultures deemed critical to U.S. national security, and who are highly motivated by the opportunity to work in the federal government.

    Fellowships enable both masters and doctoral level students representing a broad range of academic and professional disciplines to add a significant language and international dimension to their curricula. Students already enrolled in internationally oriented programs are encouraged to intensify their study of areas, languages, and cultures through overseas study and domestic tuition support.

    Applications will be available in August. Go to the David L. Boren Fellowships webpage for more information.

  • SSRC Dissertation Proposal Development Fellowship

    The DPDF is a strategic fellowship program designed to help graduate students formulate doctoral dissertation proposals that are intellectually pointed, amenable to completion in a reasonable time frame, and competitive in fellowship competitions. The program is organized around distinct “research fields,” subdisciplinary and interdisciplinary domains with common intellectual questions and styles of research. Each year, an SSRC Field Selection Committee selects five fields proposed by pairs of research directors who are tenured professors at different doctoral degree-granting programs at U.S. universities. Research directors receive a stipend of $10,000. Graduate students in the early phase of their research, generally 2nd and 3rd years, apply to one of five research fields led by the two directors; each group is made up of twelve graduate students. Fellows participate in two workshops, one in the late spring that helps prepare them to undertake predissertation research on their topics; and one in the early fall, designed to help them synthesize their summer research and to draft proposals for dissertation funding. Fellows are eligible to apply for up to $5000 from SSRC to support predissertation research during the summer. Visit the SSRC Dissertation Proposal Development Fellowship webpage for more information.

  • SSRC-Mellon Mays Graduate Initiatives Program

    The SSRC-Mellon Mays Graduate Initiatives Program offers three grants designed to meet specific needs during the doctoral degree process, two for pre-dissertators and the third for dissertators. Fellows may apply for one grant during each grant cycle. The total of the GSE and PRD grants may not exceed $5,000 during the years of eligibility.

    The Pre-doctoral Research Development (PRD) grant
    Available to second through fifth year students. It may be used for small scale, preliminary research and other activities that support the early investigation of data sources, field sites, data sets and archival materials. The PRD is subject to a $3,000 maximum and may be received one time.

    The Graduate Studies Enhancement (GSE) grant
    Available to second through fifth year students. It may be used to defer the cost of conference travel, equipment, books, journal subscriptions, software and other necessary supplies. The GSE is subject to a $1,500 annual maximum and may be received four times.

Research Phase

  • The American Historical Association’s Bernadotte Schmitt Grant

    These grants provide modest grants to support research in the history of Europe, Africa, and Asia. The funds for this program come from the earnings of a bequest from Bernadotte E. Schmitt, president of the Association in 1960. Only members of the American Historical Association are eligible to apply. Individual grants will not exceed $1,000, and the money is intended to further research in progress and may be used for travel to a library or archive, for microfilms, photographs, or photocopying—a list of purposes that is meant to be merely illustrative, not exhaustive. Preference will be given to those with specific research needs, such as the completion of a project or completion of a discrete segment thereof. Preference will also be given to Ph.D. candidates and junior scholars. The annual deadline is usually February 15th. Mailed and faxed submissions are not accepted. Visit the American Historical Association’s Bernadotte Schmitt Grant webpage for more information.

  • CLIR-Mellon Fellowships for Dissertation Research in Original Sources

    The Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) is pleased to offer fellowships funded by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation for dissertation research in the humanities in original sources. The purposes of this fellowship program are to help junior scholars in the humanities and related social-science fields gain skill and creativity in developing knowledge from original sources; enable dissertation writers to do research wherever relevant sources may be, rather than just where financial support is available; encourage more extensive and innovative uses of original sources in libraries, archives, museums, historical societies, and related repositories in the U.S. and abroad; and provide insight from the viewpoint of doctoral candidates into how scholarly resources can be developed for access most helpfully in the future. The program offers about fifteen competitively awarded fellowships for 2009. Each provides a stipend of $2,000 per month for 9–12 months. Each fellow will receive an additional $1,000 upon participating in a symposium on research in original sources and submitting an acceptable report to CLIR on the research. Fellows are expected to devote full time to their dissertation research without holding teaching or research assistantships or undertaking other paid work. Applicants may apply simultaneously for other fellowships, including Mellon awards, but fellows may not hold other fellowships simultaneously with CLIR’s. Fellows may use stipends to meet living expenses, travel costs, and other expenses that enable dissertation research to be carried out, but not to defray tuition. The next round of applications will begin in September. Visit the CLIR-Mellon Fellowships for Dissertation Research in Original Sources webpage for more information.

  • The Council of American Overseas Research Centers Multi-Country Research Fellowship (West Africa)

    This program is open to U.S. doctoral candidates and scholars who have already earned their Ph.D. in fields in the humanities, social sciences, or allied natural sciences and wish to conduct research of regional or trans-regional significance. Fellowships require scholars to conduct research in more than one country outside of the United States, at least one of which hosts a participating American overseas research center. CAORC member centers to which fellows may affiliate includes the West African Research Association. Given changing restrictions to many countries, applicants should contact CAORC before preparing a proposal.

    It is anticipated that approximately ten awards of up to $9,000 each will be given to scholars who wish to carry out research on broad questions of multi-country significance in the fields of humanities, social sciences, and related natural sciences. Fellowship tenure must be of at least 90 days duration, though that tenure need not be continuous. Fellows are required to obtain their own research permissions in countries that do not host centers. Doctoral candidates who have completed all Ph.D. requirements with the exception of the dissertation and established post-doctoral scholars are eligible to apply as individuals or in teams. Preference will be given to candidates examining comparative and/or cross-regional questions requiring research in two or more countries. All applicants must be U.S. citizens. For more information, visit the Council of American Overseas Research Centers Multi-Country Research Fellowship webpage for more information.

  • Dissertation Proposal Development Fellowship

    This award is open to second-and-third-year graduate students in the humanities and social sciences undertaking doctoral dissertation research. The deadline to apply is usually in January. Please visit the Dissertation Proposal Development Fellowship webpage for more information.

  • Friends of the Princeton University Library Research Grants

    Each year, the Friends of the Princeton University Library offer short-term Library Research Grants to promote scholarly use of the research collections. The Program in Hellenic Studies also supports a limited number of Library Research Grants in Hellenic studies, and the Cotsen Children’s Library supports research in its collection on aspects of children’s books. The Maxwell Fund supports research on materials dealing with Portuguese-speaking cultures. These Library Research Grants, which have a value of up to $2,500 each, are meant to help defray expenses incurred in traveling to and residing in Princeton during the tenure of the grant. The length of the grant will depend on the applicant’s research proposal, but is ordinarily one month. Visit the Friends of the Princeton University Library website for more information

  • The Fulbright-IIE Student Program

    This money is for students entering the research phase of their dissertations. They must apply through the International Fellowships Office at UW. Erin Crawley, the Fellowships Officer, is the contact person at the International Fellowships Office. The internal UW deadline is usually September 15. Visit the Fulbright-IIE Student Program webpage for more information.

  • The Fulbright Hayes Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad

    The Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad Fellowship Program provides opportunities for graduate students to engage in full-time dissertation research overseas in modern foreign languages and area studies. Students must apply through the International Fellowships Office at UW; the internal UW deadline is usually 10 days before the national deadline. Students may propose research for 6 to 12 months. The fellowship, whose award varies depending on research and country, may not be renewed.. Visit the Fulbright Hayes webpage for more information.

  • Humane Studies Fellowships

    The Institute for Humane Studies awards scholarships up to $12,000 for undergraduate or graduate study in the United States or abroad. Last year IHS awarded 120 scholarships to outstanding undergraduate, graduate, law, and professional students who are exploring the principles, practices, and institutions necessary to a free society through their academic work. The fellowship deadline is usually December 31st; recommendation letters must be submitted by January 16th. Visit the Humane Studies Fellowships webpage for more information.

  • The Jennings Randolph Peace Scholar Dissertation Program

    The JR Program for International Peace awards nonresidential Peace Scholar Dissertation Fellowships to students at U.S. universities who are writing doctoral dissertations on topics related to peace, conflict, and international security. Each year the program awards approximately ten Peace Scholar Fellowships. Fellowships last for 12 months starting in September, and are open to citizens of any country. Dissertation projects in all disciplines are welcome, though proposals should be consistent with the Institute’s mandate and present a research agenda with clear relevance to policy issues. Historical topics are appropriate if they promise to shed light on contemporary issues. Area studies projects and single case studies will be competitive if they focus on conflict and its resolution, apply to other regions and cases, or both. Peace Scholar Awards are currently set at $20,000 per year, are paid directly to the individual, and may not be deferred. They generally may not be combined with any other major award or fellowship except in special circumstances and with the written approval of the Institute. Peace Scholars carry out their fellowship work at their universities or other sites appropriate to their research, are expected to devote full attention to their work and provide periodic reports to the Institute, and may be invited to give a presentation at the Institute. Visit the the Jennings Randolph Peace Scholar Dissertation Program webpage for more information.

  • NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program

    For those whose research interests tends towards the social scientific end, various awards are available through the National Science Foundation. The Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP) provides three years of support for graduate study leading to research-based master’s or doctoral degrees and is intended for students who are in the early stages of their graduate study. The Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP) invests in graduate education for a cadre of diverse individuals who demonstrate their potential to successfully complete graduate degree programs in disciplines relevant to the mission of the National Science Foundation. 900 to 1,600 new awards will be offered, pending availability of funds. Visit the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program webpage for more information on registration and applications.

    Visit the National Science Foundation search page to search the full catalogue of funding opportunities he NSF provides.

  • Ruth Simms Hamilton Research Fellowship (African Diaspora)

    The TIAA-CREF Ruth Simms Hamilton Research Fellowship was established to honor the memory and outstanding work of the late Dr. Ruth Simms Hamilton, the former Michigan State University professor and TIAA Trustee. Fellowships are awarded to one or more students each year to graduate students enrolled in a social science program at an accredited U.S. college or university and studying the African Diaspora. The fellowships are awarded based on evaluation of submissions by an objective panel of judges. The submission period runs from December 1st through March 1st. Visit the TIAA-CREF Ruth Simms Hamilton Research Fellowship webpage for more information.

  • SSRC International Dissertation Research Fellowship

    The IDRF program supports distinguished graduate students in the humanities and social sciences conducting dissertation research outside the United States. Seventy-five fellowships will be awarded in 2009 with funds provided by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. The IDRF program is committed to empirical and site-specific research that advances knowledge about non-U.S. cultures and societies (involving fieldwork, research in archival or manuscript collections, or quantitative data collection). The program promotes research that is situated in a specific discipline and geographical region and is engaged with interdisciplinary and cross-regional perspectives. Fellowships will provide support for nine to twelve months of dissertation research. Individual awards will be approximately $20,000. No awards will be made for proposals requiring less than nine months of on-site research. Visit the International Dissertation Research Fellowships webpage for further detail on these and other individual awards.

  • Wenner-Gren Foundation Dissertation Research Grants (Anthropological Methods)

    Those whose work qualifies for NSF funds should also look into Wenner-Gren Dissertation Fieldwork Grants, which are awarded to aid doctoral or thesis research. The Foundation supports research that demonstrates a clear link to anthropological theory and debates, and promises to make a solid contribution to advancing these ideas. There is no preference for any methodology, research location, or subfield. The Foundation particularly welcomes proposals that employ a comparative perspective, can generate innovative approaches or ideas, and/or integrate two or more subfields. Grants are non-renewable and provide a maximum of US $25,000. Students must be enrolled in a doctoral program (or equivalent, if applying from outside the United States) at the time of application. Students of all nationalities are eligible to apply. Application deadlines are May 1st and November 1st. Final decisions are made six months later. Visit the Wenner-Gren Foundation Dissertation Research Grants webpage for more information.

Write-Up Phase

  • The Charlotte Newcombe Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship

    The Charlotte W. Newcombe Doctoral Dissertation Fellowships support the final year of work on Ph.D. dissertations dealing with ethical or religious values in fields across the humanities and social sciences. In addition to topics in religious studies or in ethics (philosophical or religious), dissertations appropriate to the Newcombe Fellowship competition might explore the ethical implications of foreign policy, the values influencing political decisions, the moral codes of other cultures, and religious or ethical issues reflected in history or literature. Candidates should apply only if their dissertations have ethical or religious values at their core, and if they can reasonably expect to complete their dissertations during tenure of the award. Visit the Charlotte Newcombe Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship for more information.

  • Frederick Douglass Institute for African and African-American Studies Pre-Doctoral Fellowship

    The Predoctoral Fellowship is awarded annually to a graduate student of any university who studies aspects of the African and African-American experience. This fellowship, which carries an annual stipend of $23,000, does not come with any teaching obligation but will require the Fellow to work with the Institute’s Director in organizing colloquium, lectures, and other events. The principal aim of this award is to expedite the completion of the Fellow’s dissertation. To qualify for this one-year residential fellowship in, an applicant will need to have completed and passed the following before the end of this academic year:

    • All required courses
    • Qualifying oral and/or written exams
    • Written at least one chapter of the dissertation (the chapter becomes part of the application package).

    All Fellows receive office space in the Institute, full access to the University’s facilities, and opportunities to interact and collaborate with scholars of their respective disciplines within the University. Fellows must be in full time residence during the tenure of their awards and are expected to be engaged in scholarly activity on a full-time basis. They must be available for consultation with students and professional colleagues; make at least two formal presentations based upon their research; and contribute generally to the intellectual discourse on African and African-American Studies. Applications are usually accepted between September and January. The award will be announced in mid-March. Visit the Frederick Douglass Institute for African and African-American Studies Pre-Doctoral Fellowship webpage for more information.

  • The Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation’s Dissertation Fellowships

    The Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation welcomes proposals that promise to increase understanding of the causes, manifestations, and control of violence, aggression, and dominance. Priority is given to research that can increase understanding and amelioration of urgent problems of violence, aggression, and dominance in the modern world. Ten or more dissertation fellowships are awarded each year to individuals who will complete the writing of the dissertation within the award year. These fellowships of $15,000 each are designed to contribute to the support of the doctoral candidate to enable him or her to complete the thesis in a timely manner, and it is only appropriate to apply for support for the final year of Ph.D. work. Applicants may be citizens of any country and studying at colleges or universities in any country.

    Particular questions that interest the foundation concern violence, aggression, and dominance in relation to social change, the socialization of children, intergroup conflict, interstate warfare, crime, family relationships, and investigations of the control of aggression and violence. Research with no useful relevance to understanding and attempting to cope with problems of human violence and aggression will not be supported, nor will proposals to investigate urgent social problems where the foundation cannot be assured that useful, sound research can be done. Priority will also be given to areas and methodologies not receiving adequate attention and support from other funding sources. Applications for dissertation fellowships must be received by February 1 for a decision in June. Visit the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation’s Dissertation Fellowships webpage for more information.

  • The Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies, Pre-doctoral Fellowships

    The Harvard Academy Scholars Program was established to identify and support outstanding scholars who are at the start of their careers whose work combines disciplinary excellence in the social sciences (including history and law) with a command of the language, history or culture of non-Western countries or regions. Their scholarship may elucidate domestic, comparative, or transnational issues, past or present. The Academy Scholars are a select group of individuals who show promise of becoming leading scholars at major universities or international institutions. They are appointed and supported by the Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies and are provided opportunities for advanced work at Harvard University. Those selected as Academy Scholars are given time, guidance, access to Harvard facilities, and substantial financial assistance as they work for two years conducting either post-doctoral or final-stage dissertation research in their chosen fields or areas. Some teaching is permitted but not required. The Senior Scholars, a distinguished group of senior Harvard faculty members, act as mentors to the Academy Scholars to help them achieve their intellectual potential.

    The competition for these awards is open only to recent Ph.D. (or comparable professional school degree) recipients and doctoral candidates. Candidates for advanced degrees must have completed all course work and general examinations by the time of application as well as reached the final stages of the dissertation research and writing. Those with Ph.D.s may not have received it more than 3 years before the application deadline. Each year four to five Academy Scholars are named for two-year appointments. Scholars are expected to reside in the Cambridge/Boston area for the duration of their appointments unless traveling for pre-approved research purposes. Post-doctoral Scholars will receive an annual stipend of $48,000, and pre-doctoral Scholars will receive an annual stipend of $28,000. This stipend is supplemented by funding for conference and research travel, and health insurance coverage. Applications are welcome from any qualified person without regard to nationality, gender, or race. Applications are usually due in early October. Visit the Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies, Pre-doctoral Fellowships webpage for application guidelines, as there is no application form.

  • Mellon/ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowships

    These fellowships are to assist graduate students in the humanities and related social sciences in the last year of Ph.D. dissertation writing. This program aims to encourage timely completion of the Ph.D. Applicants must be prepared to complete their dissertations within the period of their fellowship tenure or shortly thereafter. ACLS will award 65 Fellowships in this competition for a one-year term beginning between June and September for the academic year. The Fellowship tenure may be carried out in residence at the Fellow’s home institution, abroad, or at another appropriate site for the research. The total award of up to $33,000 includes a stipend plus additional funds for university fees and research support. These Fellowships may not be held concurrently with any other major fellowship or grant. The application deadline is usually in November; notifications will be sent in late March. Visit the Mellon/ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowships webpage for more information.

  • The Resident Scholars Program (Anthropological Methods)

    The School for Advanced Research (SAR) awards approximately six Resident Scholar Fellowships each year to scholars who have completed their research and analysis and who need time to think and write about topics important to the understanding of humankind. Resident scholars may approach their research from the perspective of anthropology or from anthropologically informed perspectives in such fields as history, sociology, art, law, and philosophy. Both humanistically and scientifically oriented scholars are encouraged to apply. SAR provides Resident Scholars with low-cost housing and office space on campus, a stipend up to $40,000, library assistance, and other benefits during a nine-month tenure, from September 1st through May 31st. SAR Press may consider books written by resident scholars for publication in its Resident Scholar Series. Four types of fellowships are available:

    • Weatherhead Fellowships – Two fellowships are available for either Ph.D. candidates or scholars with doctorates whose work is either humanistic or scientific in nature.
    • SAR Fellowships – Up to two fellowships are available for either Ph.D. candidates or scholars with doctorates whose work is either humanistic or scientific in nature.
    • Katrin H. Lamon Fellowship – One fellowship is available for a Native American scholar, either pre- or post-doctoral, working in either the humanities or the sciences.
    • Anne Ray Fellowship – One fellowship is available for an established Native American scholar, working in the humanities, arts, or the sciences, who has a commitment to providing mentorship to recent Native graduates or graduate students. In addition to working on their own research, the Anne Ray Resident Scholar serves as a mentor to two Native interns working at the Indian Arts Research Center.

    In addition, SAR is interested in hosting exceptional scholars who have received funding through the following programs: Ford Foundation Diversity Fellowships, Mellon/ACLS Recent Doctoral Recipients Fellowships, and Visiting Fulbright Scholar fellowships. Applicants to these non-SAR fellowship programs whose research is consistent with SAR’s mission may be able to join the School’s dynamic intellectual community for the duration of their fellowship. Visit SAR’s Resident Scholar webpage for more information.

  • SSRC-Mellon Mays Dissertation Completion Grant

    The SSRC-Mellon Mays Graduate Initiatives Program offers three grants designed to meet specific needs during the doctoral degree process, two for pre-dissertators and the third for dissertators. Fellows may apply for one grant during each grant cycle. The total of the GSE and PRD grants may not exceed $5,000 during the years of eligibility.

    The Pre-doctoral Research Development (PRD) grant
    Available to second through fifth year students. It may be used for small scale, preliminary research and other activities that support the early investigation of data sources, field sites, data sets and archival materials. The PRD is subject to a $3,000 maximum and may be received one time.

    The Graduate Studies Enhancement (GSE) grant
    Available to second through fifth year students. It may be used to defer the cost of conference travel, equipment, books, journal subscriptions, software and other necessary supplies. The GSE is subject to a $1,500 annual maximum and may be received four times.

  • The Erskine A. Peters Dissertation Year Fellowship at the University of Notre Dame

    The Erskine A. Peters Dissertation Year Fellowship has two overall goals, to enable outstanding African American doctoral candidates at the ABD level to devote their full energies to the completion of the dissertation, and to provide opportunities for African American scholars to experience life at the University of Notre Dame, a major Catholic research institution.

    The fellowship period extends from August to May and carries a stipend of $30,000 plus a $2,000 research budget.

    The University also provides each fellow with a home department, a faculty mentor in the fellow’s specialization area, office space with use of a personal computer, health insurance, and forum discussions on professional development.

    The University of Notre Dame is an equal opportunity employer with a strong commitment to nurturing a culturally diverse faculty and student body.

    Interested candidates for the academic year should refer to the Erskine Peters Fellowship Web site at http://africana.nd.edu/erskine/ and follow the online application instructions. Please check the Web site for application deadlines.