University of Wisconsin–Madison

United States

Masters Phase

  • American Numismatic Society - Fellowships and Grants

    The American Numismatic Society provides three forms of financial aid for study and research: 6 stipends of $4,000 for attendance at the Society’s annual Eric P. Newman Graduate Summer Seminar in Numismatics to qualifying students; the Frances M. Schwartz Fellowship; and awards from the Donald Groves Fund. Visit the webpage American Numismatic Society to learn more about all three forms.

    • The Eric P. Newman Graduate Summer Seminar – An annual intensive course open to graduate students and junior faculty. It is intended to familiarize students with numismatic methodology and scholarship. A stipend of $4,000 is available to qualifying students. Applications are due in February. Send e-mail to the Seminar Co-Director, Dr. Peter van Alfen at: vanalfen@numismatics.org for further information.
    • The Frances M. Schwartz Fellowship – Created in 1985, this fellowships aims to support work and the study of numismatic and museum methodology at the American Numismatic Society. Applicants must have the B.A. or the equivalent; the stipend will vary with the term of tenure (normally the academic year) but will not exceed $5,000.
    • The Donald Groves Fund – This fund promotes publication in the field of Early American numismatics, meaning material dating no later than 1800. Funding is available for travel and other expenses in connection with research, as well as for publication.
  • The Martin Luther King, Jr. Papers Project

    The Martin Luther King, Jr., Papers Project’s Summer Fellowship Program provides participating students with a unique opportunity to actively contribute to scholarly research and publishing. Working with the Project’s research staff under the guidance of Stanford history professor and senior editor of the King Papers, Clayborne Carson, students work on an eight-week program of research on King and the modern African American freedom struggle. Through this annual summer fellowship program, the King Papers Project engages upper level undergraduates and first- and second year graduate students in every stage of the ongoing effort to preserve the historical legacy of the civil rights movement through the publication of Dr. King’s papers. Fellows will engage in staff directed projects including the following: entering document information into several computer databases; gathering research materials about King and the black freedom struggle from newspapers and other primary and secondary sources; transcribing and cataloging handwritten and typed primary documents as well as tape recordings; drafting document annotations; and assisting in the preparation of introductory essays for the volumes. Fellows will also participate in weekly discussions with the Project’s staff and guest speakers on various aspects of the civil rights movement. Previous guests at the Project include: Dr. Herbert Aptheker, Professor Robin D. G. Kelley, Elizabeth Martinez, Wazir (Willie) Peacock, Ericka Huggins, Jimmy Collier, and Reverend C. T. Vivian.

    The King Papers Project is committed to involving students from diverse backgrounds in historical research and welcomes applications from students of all racial and ethnic identities, with particular attention paid to continuing our efforts to increase the number of undergraduate and graduate students of color preparing for academic careers. The summer fellowship program offers full time employment from mid-June through mid-August every year. The Project provides single student, on-campus housing and a stipend of $2,880 (based on 40 hrs/week for eight weeks). Transportation is not provided by the program. Junior and senior undergraduates and first and second year graduate students in the humanities or social sciences are eligible for the fellowship program. All application materials for the summer program generally are received by 1 March. Late applications are not considered. Visit the The Martin Luther King, Jr., Papers Project for details on the application procedures.

Research Phase

  • Academic Council on the United Nations System Dissertation Award (or Write Up)

    Most candidates are from political science, international law or anthropology fields, but other individuals are encouraged to apply. The applicants research should be directly related to the institutional issues of the United Nations system. Award recipients will be required to submit a final written report at the end of their award period. Applicants must be ACUNS members working on their PhD’s. The dissertation award of $1,000 is for PhD students in the final stage of their graduate work. US citizenship is not required. The deadline usually in mid-March. Visit the webpage Academic Council on the United Nations System Dissertation Award for more information, including the application.

  • Academy of American Franciscan History Dissertation Fellowship (Religious)

    The Academy of American Franciscan History is accepting applications for four dissertation fellowships, each worth $10,000. As many as two of these fellowships will be awarded for projects dealing with some aspect of the history of the Franciscan Family in Latin America, including the United States Borderlands, Mexico, Central and South America. Up to another two fellowships will be awarded to support projects dealing with some aspect of the history of the Franciscan Family in the rest of the United States and Canada. Projects may deal with any aspect of the history of the Franciscan Family, including any of the branches of the Family, male, female, tertiary, Capuchin, etc. The fellowships may be used for any valid purpose relating to the conducting of research and may be used in conjunction with other awards and grants. The recipient must be engaged in full-time research during the period of the fellowship. Proposals may be submitted in English, Spanish, French or Portuguese. The applicant must be a doctoral candidate at a University in the Americas, and the bulk of the research should be conducted in the Americas. The Board reserves the right to refuse to award any fellowships should the proposals be deemed not suitable. The deadline for applications is usually February 1st. Awards will be announced in April, and may begin as early as May. Visit the Academy of American Franciscan History Dissertation Fellowship for more information, including application details.

  • American Antiquarian Society - Short-Term Fellowships

    Located in Worcester, MA, the AAS offers short-term visiting academic research fellowships tenable for one to three months each year. The following short-term fellowships are available for scholars holding the Ph.D. and for doctoral candidates engaged in dissertation research: the Kate B. and Hall J. Peterson Fellowships are for research on any topic supported by the collections; the Legacy Fellowship is also for research on any topic supported by the collections; the Stephen Botein Fellowships are for research in the history of the book in American culture; the Joyce Tracy Fellowship is for research on newspapers and magazines or for projects using these resources as primary documentation; the AAS-Northeast Modern Language Association Fellowships are for research in literary history of America and the Atlantic World in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries that can be supported by the collections of the American Antiquarian Society; the AAS-American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies Fellowships are for research on projects related to the American eighteenth century; the American Historical Print Collectors Society Fellowship is for research on American prints of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries or for projects using prints as primary documentation; the Reese Fellowship supports research in American bibliography and projects in the history of the book in America; the “Drawn to Art” Fellowship supports research on American art, visual culture, or other projects that will make substantial use of graphic materials as primary sources; and the Jay and Deborah Last Fellowships are for research on American art, visual culture, or other projects that will make substantial use of graphic materials as primary sources. Graduate students working on pre-Reconstruction histories, especially literary, visual art and culture, and Atlantic World histories, may be interested. Most application deadlines are January 15th. Visit the webpage American Antiquarian Society – Short-Term Fellowships for more information.

  • American Catholic Association’s John Tracy Ellis Dissertation Award (or Write Up)

    The John Tracy Ellis Dissertation Award, which carries a purse of $1,200, memorializes the scholarship and teaching of Monsignor Ellis (1905-1992). Its purpose is to assist a graduate student working on some aspect of the history of the Catholic Church. Those wishing to enter the competition for the award must be citizens or authorized residents (i.e., permanent residents or on student visas) of the United States or Canada, and must be enrolled in a doctoral program at a reception at a recognized institution of higher education. Applications are due to the Secretary of the Association usually in September. Visit the webpage American Catholic Association’s John Tracy Ellis Dissertation Award for application details.

  • Asian Cultural Council Fellowships (for Asian and Asian American Studies)

    The ACC supports cultural exchange between Asia and the United States in the performing and visual arts, primarily by providing individual fellowship grants to artists, scholars, students, and specialists from Asia for study, research, travel and creative work in the United States. Grants are also awarded to Americans engaged in similar activities in Asia and to arts organizations and educational institutions for specific projects of particular significance to Asian-American cultural exchange. Because the Council’s grant funds are limited, priority consideration is currently being given to applicants from that area of Southeast and East Asia extending eastward from Burma through Japan.

    Grants are made in the following fields: archaeology, architecture (design, theory, and history), art history, art and architectural conservation, crafts, dance, film, museology, music, painting, photography, printmaking, sculpture, theater, and video. For more information on the various fellowships available, go to the webpage Asian Cultural Council Fellowships.

  • American Historical Association Research Grants

    The Albert J. Beveridge Grant for Research in the Western Hemisphere are available to support research in the history of the Western hemisphere; individual grants do not exceed $1,000. The Michael Kraus Research Grant in colonial American history, with particular reference to the intercultural aspects of American and European relations, offers cash awards of up to $800. And the Littleton-Griswold Grant offers grants of up to $1,000 for research in U.S. legal history and the field of law and society. Only AHA members are eligible to apply for these grants. All grants are offered annually and are intended to further research in progress. Preference is given to advanced doctoral students, non-tenured faculty, and unaffiliated scholars. They may be used for travel to a library or archive; microfilming, photography, or photocopying; borrowing or access fees; and similar research expenses. All three applications are due February 15th of the award year. Visit the webpage American Historical Association Research Grants for more information.

  • American Philosophical Society

    The APS Library, located near Independence Hall in Philadelphia, is a leading international center for research in the history of American science and technology and its European roots, as well as early American history and culture. The Library houses over 7 million manuscripts, 300,000 volumes and bound periodicals, and thousands of maps and prints. The various funding opportunities provided by the APS are intended to encourage research in the Library’s collections by scholars who reside beyond a 75-mile radius of Philadelphia. Applicants must be U.S. citizens or foreign nationals who are holders of the Ph.D. or the equivalent, Ph.D. candidates who have passed their preliminary exams, or independent scholars. Applicants in any relevant field of scholarship may apply.

    • The John Hope Dissertation Fellowship – This fellowship, named in honor of a distinguished member of the American Philosophical Society, is designed to support an outstanding doctoral student at an American university who is conducting dissertation research. There are two special features to this fellowship.First, the objective of the John Hope Franklin Dissertation Fellowship is to help remedy the serious shortage of faculty of color in core fields in the arts and sciences. Second, the John Hope Franklin Fellow is expected to spend a significant amount of time in residence at the APS Library and therefore all applicants should be pursuing dissertation topics in which the holdings of the Library are especially strong, such as quantum mechanics, nuclear physics, computer development, the history of genetics and eugenics, the history of medicine, Early American political and cultural history, natural history in the 18th and 19th centuries, the development of cultural anthropology, or American Indian linguistics and culture. The APS Library’s extensive collections in these and many other fields are fully described on our www.amphilsoc.org/library website. The stipend for this fellowship is $25,000 for a twelve-month period, plus $5,000 to support the cost of residency in Philadelphia, for a total award of $30,000. The twelve-month period is flexible.Candidates must have completed all course work and examinations preliminary to the doctoral dissertation and be prepared to devote full time for twelve months—with no teaching obligations—to research on their dissertation projects or the writing of their dissertations. The John Hope Franklin Fellow will also be expected to spend a minimum of three months in Philadelphia, in residence at the APS Library with full encouragement to conduct research at other libraries and archives in and around the city. Attractive office space will be provided for the Fellow. Applications are usually due in April, with notification in May. Visit the webpage The John Hope Franklin Dissertation Fellowship for more information.
    • Library Resident Research Fellowships – The American Philosophical Society Library offers short-term residential fellowships for conducting research in its collections. The fellowships, funded by a number of generous benefactors, are open to both U.S. citizens and foreign nationals who are holders of the Ph.D. or the equivalent, Ph.D. candidates who have passed their preliminary examinations, and independent scholars. Applicants in any relevant field of scholarship may apply. Candidates who live 75 or more miles from Philadelphia will receive some preference. The stipend is $2,000 per month, and the term of the fellowship is a minimum of one month and a maximum of three. Fellowships are usually of one month in duration, and seldom exceed two months. Fellows are required to be in residence at the Library for four to twelve consecutive weeks, depending upon the length of their award. Applications are due no later than March 1st. This is a receipt deadline. Visit the webpage Library Resident Research Fellowships for more information.
    • Phillips Fund Grant for Native American Research – The Phillips Fund of the American Philosophical Society provides grants for research in Native American linguistics, ethno-history, and the history of studies of Native Americans, in the continental United States and Canada. The grants are intended for such costs as travel, tapes, films, and consultants’ fees but not for the purchase of books or permanent equipment. The committee prefers to support the work of younger scholars who have received the doctorate. Applications are also accepted from graduate students for research on masters theses or doctoral dissertations. The average award is about $2,500; grants do not exceed $3,500. Grants are given for one year following the date of the award. Applications are due by March 1st. This is a receipt deadline, not a postmark deadline. Visit the webpage Phillips Fund Grant for Native American Research for more information.
  • Canadian Studies Doctoral Student Research Award

    The Doctoral Student Research Award promotes research that contributes to a better knowledge and understanding of Canada, its relationship with the United States, and its international affairs. The grant is designed to give doctoral students an opportunity to conduct part of their research in Canada. We welcome efforts to integrate the research findings into the applicant’s conference presentations. We are particularly interested in projects that have policy relevance for Canada and Canada-U.S. relations. Topics that are highly relevant to Canada-U.S. relations include smart and secure borders; North American economic competitiveness; regulatory cooperation; Canada-U.S. trade and investment partnership; energy security and sustainability; environmental sustainability; emergency planning and management; Canada-U.S. security and defense cooperation; Canada in Afghanistan; global health policy; and changing demographics in North America. We strongly encourage projects that include collaboration with researchers at Canadian institutions. Over the past three years, applicants have had a 37 percent success rate. Candidates must be citizens or permanent residents of the United States and should have completed all doctoral requirements except the dissertation when they apply for a grant. Applicants are ineligible to receive the same grant in two consecutive years. They may request funding up to US$10,000. Applications must usally be sent electronically no later than October 31st. Visit the webpage Canada Welcome Page for more information.

  • Caroline and Erwin Swann Foundation for Caricature and Cartoon (Any Stage)

    The Swann Foundation, located at the Library of Confress, seeks to award one fellowship annually (with a stipend of up to $15,000) to assist the fellow in his/her ongoing scholarly research and writing projects in the field of caricature and cartoon. In lieu of one fellowship, the board has made smaller awards to several recipients in recent years due to the number, nature, and quality of fellowship applications. To be eligible, one must be a candidate for an M.A. or Ph.D. degree in an accredited graduate program in a university in the United States, Canada or Mexico and working toward the completion of a dissertation or thesis for that degree, or be engaged in postgraduate research within three years of receiving an M.A. or Ph.D. Although research must be in the field of caricature and cartoon, there is no limitation regarding the place or time period covered. Since the Fund encourages research in a variety of academic disciplines, there is no restriction upon the university department in which this work is being done, provided the subject pertains to caricature or cartoon art. Individuals who are not U.S. residents but who otherwise meet the above academic qualifications may also apply and be considered for a fellowship, contingent upon the applicant’s visa eligibility. In the interest of increasing awareness and extending documentation of Library of Congress collections, fellows are required to make use of the Library’s collections, be in residence for at least two weeks during the award period and deliver a public lecture on his/her work-in-progress at that time. Each recipient must also provide a copy of their dissertation, thesis, or postgraduate publication, upon its completion, for the Swann Foundation Fund files. The fellowship will support a two-week research residency at the Library of Congress where the fellow will utilize and document the Library’s extensive collections. Completed applications are usually due in February. The fellowship will begin in September 2009. Visit the webpage Caroline and Erwin Swann Foundation for Caricature and Cartoon for the application.

  • CLIR - Mellon Fellowships for Dissertation Research in Original Sources

    The Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) is pleased to offer fellowships funded by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation for dissertation research in the humanities in original sources. The purposes of this fellowship program are to help junior scholars in the humanities and related social-science fields gain skill and creativity in developing knowledge from original sources; enable dissertation writers to do research wherever relevant sources may be, rather than just where financial support is available; encourage more extensive and innovative uses of original sources in libraries, archives, museums, historical societies, and related repositories in the U.S. and abroad; and provide insight from the viewpoint of doctoral candidates into how scholarly resources can be developed for access most helpfully in the future. The program offers about fifteen competitively awarded fellowships. Each provides a stipend of $2,000 per month for 9–12 months. Each fellow will receive an additional $1,000 upon participating in a symposium on research in original sources and submitting an acceptable report to CLIR on the research experience. Thus, the maximum award will be $25,000. Fellows are expected to devote full time to their dissertation research without holding teaching or research assistantships or undertaking other paid work. Applicants may apply simultaneously for other fellowships, including Mellon awards, but fellows may not hold other fellowships simultaneously with CLIR’s. Fellows may use stipends to meet living expenses, travel costs, and other expenses that enable dissertation research to be carried out, but not to defray tuition. Complete applications are due using CLIR’s online application form usually in November. Visit the webpage CLIR-Mellon Fellowships for Dissertation Research in Original Sources for more information.

  • Cushwa Center for the Study of American Catholicism Travel Grants

    The Center offers up to $2,000 to help defray travel and lodging costs of scholars in any academic discipline engaged in projects that require substantial use of the collection of the library and/or the archives of the University of Notre Dame. The Center also says it doesn’t offer grants typically to pre-doctoral students, but they actually do. Apply anyway. The library collection is particularly rich in the following areas: Catholic newspapers, history of mid-western Catholicism, Catholic literature, and history of Catholicism in the United States. Manuscripts of historical personages, records of twentieth century Catholic organizations, reports of European missionary societies, and much more material related to the American Catholic community. Applicants should indicate as specifically as possible how the use of the Notre Dame library and archives are pertinent to this study. Recipients of grants will be requested to: supply the Center with a short report on the results of their research; acknowledge the grant provided by the Center in all publications which result from this research; and provide the Center with one copy of any publication resulting in whole, or in part, from the grant. Applications are due annually at December 31st. Visit the webpage Cushwa Center for the Study of American Catholicism Travel Grants for the application and further instructions.

  • Dissertation Proposal Development Fellowship

    This award is open to second-and-third-year graduate students in the humanities and social sciences undertaking doctoral dissertation research. The deadline to apply is usually in January. Please visit the Dissertation Proposal Development Fellowship webpage for more information.

  • Duke’s Rare Book, Manuscript, and Special Collections Library’s Research Grants (African Americans and Business)

    The Rare Book, Manuscript, and Special Collections Library of Duke University announces the availability of grants for researchers whose work would benefit from access to the library’s archival and rare printed collections. These grants are offered by the library’s research centers: The Sallie Bingham Center for Women’s History and Culture; The John Hope Franklin Collection of African and African-American Documentation; and The John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History. Researchers may apply for grants from more than one center. The maximum award per applicant is $1,000. For the research centers’ grants we strongly encourage applicants to speak with staff of the respective centers or with Research Services staff before applying for a grant.

    Travel Grants – The Franklin Collection offers travel grants for research involving the use of the collections of the John Hope Franklin Collection or for research with a focus on African and African-American studies. For more information, please consult the Franklin Collection website or contact franklin-center@duke.edu, tel. 919-660-5922.

    J. Walter Thompson Research Fellowships – The Hartman Center offers travel grants up to $750 for the use of any of the Hartman Center’s collections. In addition, the Center will fund up to three J. Walter Thompson Research Fellowships. Each Fellow will receive a stipend of $1000 during his or her stay in Durham. Fellowships are available to researchers planning to spend a minimum of two weeks at Duke doing research that focuses on the J. Walter Thompson Company Archives. For more information, please consult the Hartman Center Web site or contact Lynn Eaton, Reference Archivist, John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History, hartman-center@duke.edu, tel. 919-660-5827.

  • Friends of the Princeton University Library Research Grants

    Each year, the Friends of the Princeton University Library offer short-term Library Research Grants to promote scholarly use of the research collections. The Program in Hellenic Studies also supports a limited number of Library Research Grants in Hellenic studies, and the Cotsen Children’s Library supports research in its collection on aspects of children’s books. The Maxwell Fund supports research on materials dealing with Portuguese-speaking cultures. These Library Research Grants, which have a value of up to $2,500 each, are meant to help defray expenses incurred in traveling to and residing in Princeton during the tenure of the grant. The length of the grant will depend on the applicant’s research proposal, but is ordinarily one month. The deadline for applications is usually in January. Visit the webpage Friends of the Princeton University Library Research Grants for more information.

  • German Historical Institute’s Research Grants (or Write Up)
    • Doctoral Fellowships – The GHI awards short-term fellowships to German and American doctoral students as well as post-doctoral scholars in the fields of German history, the history of German-American relations, and the history of the role of Germany and the USA in international relations. The fellowships are usually granted for periods of one to six months but, depending on the funds available, can be extended by one or more months. The research projects must draw upon primary sources located in the United States. The GHI will not provide funding for preliminary research, manuscript composition or the revision of manuscripts. It will give clear priority to those post-doc projects that are designed for the “second book”. The monthly stipend is approximately € 1,600 for doctoral students and € 2,800 for post-doctoral scholars. The deadline is normally in December. Visit the webpage German Historical Institute’s Research Grants for more information.
    • GHI Fellowships at the Horner Library – Together with the German Society of Pennsylvania, the German Historical Institute will sponsor two to four fellowships of up to four weeks for research at the Joseph Horner Memorial Library in Philadelphia between June 1st and July 15st. The fellowship will be awarded to Ph.D. and M.A. students and advanced scholars without restrictions in research fields or geographical provenance. The “GHI Fellowship at the Horner Library” will provide a travel subsidy and an allowance of $1,000 to $3,500 depending on the length of the stay and the qualifications of the fellows. Opportunities to research at other special collections in Philadelphia may be available.

    The Joseph Horner Memorial Library houses 70,000 volumes and is the largest German American collection outside of a university. The collection offers rich materials from the 17th to the 20th centuries to historians of German American immigration culture, especially in Pennsylvania, as well as historians of German fictional and non-fictional literature, including travel and popular literature. See the reference guide on the GHI web site and the catalog at the German Society of Pennsylvania. Applications (in English or German) should be made electronically to the GHI (c/o Christa Brown). They should include a project description of two pages, curriculum vitae, transcripts of academic degrees, and the name of at least one referee. Application deadline is usually March 1.

  • The Gilder Lehrman Institute’s Short-Term Grants (Early and African American, especially—also for Write Up)

    The Gilder Lehrman Institute for American History offers Research Fellowships for post-doctoral scholars at every faculty rank, Dissertation Fellowships for doctoral candidates who have completed exams and begun dissertation reading and writing, and Research Fellowships for journalists and independent scholars. The Gilder Lehrman Fellowships support work in one of five archives: the Gilder Lehrman Collection; the Library of the New-York Historical Society; the Columbia University Rare Book and Manuscript Library; the New York Public Library Humanities and Social Sciences Library; and the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture. Fellowships last from a week to two months. Stipends range from $1,500 to $4,000. Application deadlines are annually the 1st of December and May. Visit the webpage Gilder Lehrman Institute’s Short-Term Grants for more information.

  • Humane Studies Fellowships (Any Stage)

    The Institute for Humane Studies awards scholarships up to $12,000 for undergraduate or graduate study in the United States or abroad. Last year IHS awarded 120 scholarships to outstanding undergraduate, graduate, law, and professional students who are exploring the principles, practices, and institutions necessary to a free society through their academic work. The fellowship deadline is usually December 31st; recommendation letters must be submitted by mid-January. Visit the webpage Humane Studies Fellowships for more information.

  • Huntington Library Fellowships (Middle Ages, Renaissance, and U.S., especially U.S. West and the History of Science and Technology)

    The Huntington is an independent research center with holdings in British and American history, literature, art history, and the history of science and medicine. Its areas of special strength include the Middle Ages, Renaissance, Eighteenth Century, Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century Literature, British Drama, Colonial America, American Civil War, Western America, and California. The Huntington will award to scholars over one hundred fellowships for the academic year. These fellowships derive from a variety of funding sources and have different terms. Recipients of all fellowships are expected to be in continuous residence at The Huntington and to participate in and make a contribution to its intellectual life. For the Huntington Fellowships, applicants must have a PhD (or equivalent) or be doctoral candidates at the dissertation stage. Tenure ranges from one to five months and awards are $2500 per month. Within this category, The Huntington awards a number of specialized fellowships, including: Francis Bacon Foundation Fellowships in Renaissance England; Haynes Foundation Fellowships in Los Angeles History; Reese Fellowship in American Bibliography and the History of the Book in the Americas; Trent R. Dames Civil Engineering History Fellowship; Christopher Isherwood Foundation Fellowships.

  • Indiana University’s Lilly Library Travel Fellowships

    The Lilly Library invites applications for visiting fellowships for research in residence in its collections. The Lilly Library is the principal rare book and manuscript library of Indiana University. Its holdings support research in British, French, and American literature and history; the literature of voyages and exploration, specifically the European expansion in the Americas; early printing, and the Church, children’s literature, music; film, radio and television; medicine, science, and architecture; and food and drink. Visit the webpage Indiana University’s Lilly Library Travel Fellowships for more information.

    The Everett Helm Visiting Fellowships
    The Everett Helm Visiting Fellowship program supports research and provides access to the collections of the Lilly Library for scholars residing outside the Bloomington area. Project proposals should demonstrate that the Lilly Library’s resources are integral to proposed research topics. Candidates are encouraged to inquire about the appropriateness of a proposed topic before applying. Successful applicants will receive an award of up to $1,500 in support of travel, living, and/or research expenses. Awards must be used within one year of the award date and recipients must reside in Bloomington during the period of their awards. Application deadlines are April 15th and October 15th.

    Mendel Fellowships
    Established through a bequest by the estate of Johanna Lenz Mendel in 1998, the Mendel Fellowships are intended to support research by scholars from around the world in areas of particular interest to the Mendels, including: the history of the Spanish Colonial Empire; Latin American independence movements; European expansion in the Americas; voyages, travels and exploration; geography, navigation and cartography; German literature and history; and music, including sheet music. The amount of the stipend is based on the length of stay, which may range from one week to a full academic year. The fellowship is intended to cover travel to the Lilly Library and living expenses while in residence. Application deadlines are April 15th and October 15th.

  • The Jennings Randolph Peace Scholar Dissertation Program (or Write Up)

    The JR Program for International Peace awards nonresidential Peace Scholar Dissertation Fellowships to students at U.S. universities who are writing doctoral dissertations on topics related to peace, conflict, and international security. Each year the program awards approximately ten Peace Scholar Fellowships. Fellowships last for 12 months starting in September. Fellowships are open to citizens of any country. Dissertation projects in all disciplines are welcome, though proposals should be consistent with the Institute’s mandate and present a research agenda with clear relevance to policy issues. Historical topics are appropriate if they promise to shed light on contemporary issues. Area studies projects and single case studies will be competitive if they focus on conflict and its resolution, apply to other regions and cases, or both. Peace Scholar Awards are currently set at $20,000 per year, are paid directly to the individual, and may not be deferred. They generally may not be combined with any other major award or fellowship except in special circumstances and with the written approval of the Institute. Peace Scholars carry out their fellowship work at their universities or other sites appropriate to their research, are expected to devote full attention to their work and provide periodic reports to the Institute, and may be invited to give a presentation at the Institute. The deadline is usually in early January. Visit the webpage The Jennings Randolph Peace Scholar Dissertation Program for more information.

  • John Carter Brown Library’s Short-Term Fellowships (Colonial)

    Sponsorship of research at the John Carter Brown Library is reserved exclusively for scholars whose work is centered on the colonial history of the Americas, North and South, including all aspects of the European, African, and Native American involvement. Regular John Carter Brown Library Fellowships are available for periods of two to four months and carry a stipend of $2,000 per month. These Fellowships are open to Americans and foreign nationals who are engaged in pre- or post-doctoral, or independent, research. Graduate students must have passed their preliminary or general examinations at the time of application. Visit the John Carter Brown Library Website for more information.

  • Leo Baeck Institute for the Study of the History & Culture of German-Speaking Jewry (U.S. and Germany)

    LBI and DAAD Fellowships – The LBI and the DAAD announce the availability of two fellowships per year for doctoral students affiliated with an accredited U.S. institution of higher education or recent Ph.D.’s. They provide financial assistance to students for dissertation research work and to academics for writing a scholarly essay or book. Extensive use of LBI New York resources is to aid research projects falling within the field of study served by the LBI, namely the social, communal and intellectual history of German-speaking Jewry. The fellowship consists of a stipend of $2000, paid in two installments of $1000, and is normally used within one calendar year. Support for travel or family members is not available. Applicants must be US citizens, and Ph.D. candidates or recent Ph.D’s who have received their degrees within the preceding two years.

    The LBI and the DAAD also announce the availability of one six- month, or two three-month graduate fellowship(s) per year for doctoral students or academics affiliated with an accredited U.S. institution of higher education. The fellowship is to provide financial assistance to doctoral students doing research for their dissertation and to academics in the preparation of a scholarly essay or book that requires a period of research in libraries, archives or research institutions in the Federal Republic of Germany. The research must be in the field of study served by the LBI, i.e. the social, communal and intellectual history of German-speaking Jewry. The fellowship consists of a monthly stipend of up to EUR 975.00 (depending on level of academic advancement) to cover expenses during the time abroad. The tenure of the fellowship must fall within the period July through January. Support for travel is a one-time lump sum of EUR 520.00. Support for family members is not available. The stipend will be paid in monthly installments after arrival in the Federal Republic of Germany. Applicants must be US citizens, and Ph.D. candidates or recent Ph.D.s. who have received their degrees within the preceding two years.

    Fritz Halbers Fellowship
    The LBI announces the availability of one or more fellowship per year for students enrolled in a Ph.D. program at an accredited institution of higher education. The fellowships provide financial assistance to scholars whose research projects are connected with the culture and history of German-speaking Jewry. The fellowship(s) consists of an award, not exceeding $ 3000, to be determined according to the requirements of the project. The fellowship should be used by the end of the year in which it was granted. Support for travel or family members is not available. Applications for the fellowship must be submitted in writing to the Director not later than November 1st. Decisions will be announced in January.

    Fred Grubel Fellowship
    The LBI announces the availability of a paid summer internship program for a graduate student who will participate in work on a specific research topic (jointly determined by the candidate and the LBI) related to LBI collections, which can include archives, library, photo collection, and art collection. The research project should pertain to the lives of refugees of the 1930s and 1940s in New York. The fellow will be supervised by the director of research and will work on a day-to-day basis with archives and library staff. Ph.D. candidates from history, sociology, literature, or Jewish studies programs are eligible. The compensation is $1,500 per month. The deadline for applications is the fall of the year prior to the summer internship. Decisions will be made in early spring.

    Visit the webpage Leo Baeck Institute for the Study of the History & Culture of German-Speaking Jewry for more information on any of these awards.

  • The Library Company of Philadelphia (Early American History)

    Short Term Fellowships (Variously Named)
    The Library Company of Philadelphia and The Historical Society of Pennsylvania will jointly award approximately thirty one-month fellowships for research in residence in either or both collections during the academic year 2008-2009. These two independent research libraries, adjacent to each other in Center City Philadelphia, have complementary collections capable of supporting research in a variety of fields and disciplines relating to the history of America and the Atlantic world from the 17th through the 19th centuries, as well as Mid-Atlantic regional history to the present. The Stipend is $2,000. Deadline for receipt of applications is usually March 1st with a decision to be made by April 15th. Visit the webpage Visiting Research Fellowships in Colonial and U.S. History and Culture for a list of available named fellowships.

    The Albert M. Greenfield Foundation Dissertation Fellowship
    This fellowship supports dissertation research in residence at the Library Company on any subject relevant to its collections. The term of the fellowship is usually from September to May, with a stipend of $20,000. The award may be divided between two applicants, each of whom would spend a semester in residence. Deadline for receipt of applications is usually March 1st. Visit the webpage The Albert M. Greenfield Foundation Dissertation Fellowship for more information.

    PEAES Dissertation and One-Month Fellowships
    In conjunction with its Program in Early American Economy and Society, the Library Company is augmenting, cataloguing, and conserving its collections related to economy and society — including the areas of commerce, business, banking, technology, and other fields — and is also compiling a regional survey of related scholarly resources. One dissertation-level fellowship, carrying a stipend of $20,000, is tenable for nine consecutive months of residency from September 1st to May 31st. It may also be divided between two scholars, who would each receive $10,000 for the periods between Sepember 1st to December 15th or December 15th to May 31st. Available to scholars at all levels, four one-month fellowships, carrying stipends of $2,000 each, are tenable for a month of research at the Library Company between June 1st and May 31st.

    Deadline for receipt of one-month and dissertation fellowship applications is usually March 1st. Reply date is March 31st. These fellowships are designed to promote scholarship in early American economy and society, broadly defined, from its colonial beginnings to roughly the 1850s. Some of the possible topics of research include the history of commerce, finance, technology, manufacturing, agriculture, internal improvements, and political economy. Applicants for long-term awards may submit proposals based not only on the extensive collections at the Library Company, but also on the printed and manuscript materials of other institutions in the Philadelphia area. Fellows will share opportunities to participate in the growing intellectual life of the Program in Early American Economy and Society and contribute to the Library Company’s other scholarly activities. Visit the webpage PEAES Dissertation and One-Month Fellowships for more information.

  • The Massachusetts Historical Society Research Fellowships

    The Massachusetts Historical Society now offers more assistance than ever before to the researchers who need to use its collections. In addition to approximately 20 short-term fellowships, the Society will help to provide at least 11 New England Regional Fellowship Consortium grants for projects that draw on the resources of several participating institutions, and at least two long-term MHS-NEH fellowships for study at the MHS. Visit the webpage The Massachusetts Historical Society Research Fellowships for the list.

    Short-Term Research Fellowships
    The MHS will offer approximately twenty short-term research fellowships in 2009. Except where otherwise noted, each grant will provide a stipend of $1,500 for four weeks of research at the Society sometime between 1 July, and 30 June. Short-term awards are open to independent scholars, advanced graduate students, and holders of the Ph.D. or the equivalent, with candidates who live fifty or more miles from Boston receiving preference. Recipients must be U.S. citizens or foreign nationals holding the appropriate U.S. government documents. Applications must usually be submitted by March 1st.

    The New England Regional Fellowship Consortium
    Each grant will provide a stipend of $5,000 for a minimum of eight weeks of research at participating institutions. Awards are open to U.S. citizens and foreign nationals who hold the necessary U.S. government documents. Grants are designed to encourage projects that draw on the resources of several agencies. Each award will be for research at a minimum of three different member institutions. Fellows must work at each of them for at least two weeks. NERFC expects fellows to visit all the repositories they list in their proposals. The Consortium’s policy is to ensure that each member with collections hosts fellows every year. An applicant’s proposed itinerary may be a factor in the decision whether to award a fellowship. In keeping with NERFC’s regional interests, the Consortium may also favor applications that draw on institutions from more than one metropolitan area. The submission deadline is usually February 1st.

    Suzanne and Caleb Loring Research Fellowship
    The Massachusetts Historical Society and the Boston Athenaeum will award one Suzanne and Caleb Loring Fellowship on the Civil War, Its Origins, and Consequences this year. The recipient will conduct research for at least four weeks at each institution. The Athenaeum’s Civil War collections are anchored by its holdings of Confederate states imprints, the largest in the nation, consisting of books, maps, broadsides, sheet music, government documental publications, and other materials organized according to the Parrish & Willingham bibliography. The Society’s manuscript holdings on the Civil War are particularly strong. They include, for instance, diaries, photographs, correspondence from the battlefield and the home front, papers of political leaders, materials on black regiments raised in Massachusetts, and extensive holdings on the U.S. Sanitary Commission. The Athenaeum and the Society are especially interested in projects for which both repositories’ resources are vital. The fellowship carries a stipend of $4,000. Each institution will automatically refer unsuccessful proposals to its short-term fellowship competition. Applications must usually be submitted by February 15th.

  • Marshall-Baruch Fellowships (20th Century U.S. Foreign Relations)

    The Marshall/Baruch Fellowships are given to encourage doctoral or postdoctoral research in 20th-century U.S. military or diplomatic history and related fields. The fellowships are administered by the George C. Marshall Foundation – a non- profit, non-governmental institution – and generated from a gift provided annually by the Baruch Family Foundation of Encino, California. The fellowships honor the career of George C. Marshall, 20th-century soldier-statesman, and the Baruch family. The maximum grant is $7,500, though requests for smaller grants are encouraged. Funded projects may cover a broad range of studies in U.S. History and related fields pertaining to the changing role of the United States as a world power in the 20th century. And finally, your research may utilize holdings in the Marshall Research Library or may be conducted elsewhere. Application deadlines are usually in late October. Visit the webpage Marshall/Baruch Fellowships for more information.

  • The McNeil Center for Early American Studies Dissertation Fellowship Program (Early American—for Write Up too)

    The MCEAS offers several pre-doctoral dissertation fellowships each year for a term of nine months, beginning September 1st. Advanced graduate students from any PhD-granting institution who are in the dissertation research or writing stage are eligible to compete for these fellowships, which are open to scholars in any discipline for projects focusing on North America and the Caribbean before 1850. Proposals reliant on research in Philadelphia-area archives and libraries are especially welcome. Fellows in 2008 will receive a stipend of at least $18,000 payable in monthly installments. While a limited number of shorter-term awards may be made, all candidates should apply for a nine-month appointment. Fellows receive office space in the Center’s magnificent new building on the University of Pennsylvania’s historic campus and library, computer, and other privileges at the University. Limited travel funds for research are also available. While no teaching is required for most fellowships, all McNeil Center fellows are expected to be in residence in Philadelphia during the academic year and to participate regularly in the Center’s program of seminars and other activities.

    Doctoral candidates from any PhD-granting institution who are in the research or writing stage of the dissertation are eligible to compete for these fellowships. Any project dealing with the histories and cultures of North America in the Atlantic world before 1850 will be considered. Proposals dependent on the use of Philadelphia-area archives and libraries are particularly welcome. Applications are encouraged from students of all relevant disciplines, including African American Studies, American Studies, Anthropology, Economics, Folklore, Gender Studies, History, Law, Literature, Music, Political Science, Religion, Urban Studies, and Women’s Studies. Applications are usually due March 1st. Visit the webpage The McNeil Center for Early American Studies Dissertation Fellowship Program for a list of available fellowships.

  • NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program

    For those whose research interests tends towards the social scientific end, various awards are available through the National Science Foundation. The Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP) provides three years of support for graduate study leading to research-based master’s or doctoral degrees and is intended for students who are in the early stages of their graduate study. The Graduate Research Fellowship Program (GRFP) invests in graduate education for a cadre of diverse individuals who demonstrate their potential to successfully complete graduate degree programs in disciplines relevant to the mission of the National Science Foundation. 900 to 1,600 new awards will be offered, pending availability of funds. Visit the webpage NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Program for more information on registration and applications.

    Visit the website NSF Find Funding to search the full catalogue of funding opportunities the NSF provides.

  • National Institute of Justice (NIJ) Graduate Research Fellowships

    Sponsored by the Department of Justice, NIJ’s Graduate Research Fellowship Program is an annual program that provides assistance to universities for dissertation research support to outstanding doctoral students undertaking independent research on issues related to crime and justice. Students from any academic discipline may propose original research that has direct implications for criminal justice in the United States. Candidates must have finished all coursework and preliminary exams, though in certain situations the dissertation proposal need not have been completed at the time of application. Stipends vary each year, but usually they cover a 12-month period. The application deadline is usually in November. Visit the webpage National Institute of Justice (NIJ) Graduate Research Fellowships for more information.

  • Newberry Library’s Short Term Fellowships

    Short-term fellowships are generally restricted to post-doctoral scholars, Ph.D. candidates, or holders of other terminal degrees from outside of the Chicago area who have a specific need for Newberry collections. The tenure of short-term fellowships varies from one week to two months, unless otherwise noted under the award description. A majority of fellowships will be for one month or less and, unless otherwise noted, the amount of the award is $1600 per month, pro-rated for shorter periods. Go to the webpage Newberry Library’s Short Term Fellowships for a list of available fellowships.

  • OAH/IEHS John Higham Travel Grants

    OAH and the Immigration and Ethnic History Society (IEHS) have created a fund to award travel grants in memory of John Higham (1920-2003), past president of both organizations, and a towering figure in immigration, ethnic, and intellectual history. Travel grants of $500 are awarded to three (3) graduate students each year. Funds are to be used by graduate students toward costs of attending the OAH/IEHS annual meeting. The successful candidates will have a preferred area of concentration in American Immigration and/or American Ethnic and/or American Intellectual history. Applicants will be required to include a short statement of no more than 500 words about how they envision attending the annual meeting will help prepare them for a career in history. One complete copy of each application should be sent to each committee member listed below and received by December 1st. Recipients will be notified after February 1st. Grants will be given to student when he/she attends the OAH/IEHS annual meeting. Visit the webpage OAH/IEHS John Higham Travel Grants for more information.

  • The Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission (PMHC) Scholars in Residence Program

    The Scholars in Residence Program of the (PHMC) supports short-term, full-time research and study in collections maintained by Commission facilities, including the Pennsylvania State Archives, The State Museum of Pennsylvania, and the State Historic Preservation Office, all in Harrisburg, and 25 historic sites and museums throughout the Commonwealth. The Scholars in Residence Program has a four-fold purpose: to promote the interpretation of Pennsylvania history; to encourage research that draws upon the Commission’s archival, artifact, and architectural collections; to promote the dissemination of research findings to both the professional community of scholars and the public; and to develop collegial relationships between scholars and Commission staff. Stipends are awarded for a period of up to eight consecutive weeks at the rate of $375 per week. Residencies may begin May 1 of the year in which application is made and must be completed by April 30 of the following year. The application deadline is the second Friday in January. Notification of awards is made in late March. Approximately five to seven awards are made annually. The Program is open to all who are currently engaged in or who plan to conduct research on Pennsylvania history, including academic scholars, public sector professionals in history-related disciplines, independent scholars, graduate students, writers, filmmakers, and educators. Visit the webpage PMHC Scholars in Residence Program for more information.

  • Smith Richardson Foundation’s World Politics and Statecraft Fellowship

    The Smith Richardson Foundation is pleased to announce a new annual grant competition to support Ph.D. dissertation research on American foreign policy, international relations, international security, strategic studies, area studies, and diplomatic and military history. The fellowship’s objective is to support the research and writing of policy-relevant dissertations through funding of fieldwork, archival research, and language training. In evaluating applications, the Foundation will accord preference to those projects that could directly inform U.S. policy debates and thinking, rather than dissertations that are principally focused on abstract theory or debates within a scholarly discipline. The Foundation will award up to twenty grants of $7,500 each. The application cycle usually ends in October. Visit the webpage Smith Richardson Foundation’s World Politics and Statecraft Fellowship for more information, including application instructions.

  • Smithsonian Fellowships and Internships (or Write Up)
  • The Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations (SHAFR) Awards

    Myrna F. Bernath Fellowship
    The Myrna Bernath Fellowship of $5,000 is intended to defray the costs of scholarly research by women. It is awarded biannually (in odd years) and announced at the SHAFR luncheon held during the annual meeting of the Organization of American Historians. Applications are welcomed from women at U.S. universities as well as women abroad who wish to do research in the United States. Preference will be given to graduate students within five years of completion of their Ph.D.s. Within eight months of receiving the award, each successful applicant must file with the SHAFR Business Office a brief report on how the funds were spent. Such reports will be considered for publication in Passport. The deadline for applications for the Fellowship is usually December 1.

    Michael J. Hogan Fellowship
    The Hogan Fellowship of $4,000 is intended to promote research in foreign language sources by graduate students. The fellowship is intended to defray the costs of studying foreign languages needed for research. It is announced at the SHAFR luncheon held during the annual meeting of the Organization of American Historians. Applicants must be graduate students researching some aspect of U.S. foreign relations history. Membership in SHAFR is not required. Within eight months of receiving the award, each successful applicant must file with the SHAFR Business Office a brief report on how the funds were spent. Such reports will be considered for publication in Passport. Nominations and supporting materials must usually be received by February 1.

    W. Stull Holt Dissertation Fellowship
    The W. Stull Holt Dissertation Fellowship of $4,000 is intended to defray the costs of travel, preferably foreign travel, necessary to conduct research on a significant dissertation project. The fellowship is awarded annually at the SHAFR luncheon held during the annual meeting of the Organization of American Historians. Applicants must have satisfactorily completed all requirements for the doctoral degree except the dissertation and be actively working on dissertations dealing with some aspect of U.S. foreign relations history. Membership in SHAFR is not required. Within eight months of receiving the award, each successful applicant must file with the SHAFR Business Office a brief report on how the funds were spent. Such reports will be considered for publication in Passport.To be considered for the award, nominations and supporting materials must usually be received by February 1.

    Samuel Flagg Bemis Research Grants
    The Samuel F. Bemis Research Grants are intended to promote research by doctoral candidates, by untenured faculty members, and by those within six years of the Ph.D. and working as professional historians. A limited number of grants of varying amounts (generally, up to $2,000) will be awarded annually to help defray the costs of domestic or international travel necessary to conduct research on significant scholarly projects. Applicants must have satisfactorily completed all requirements for the doctoral degree except the dissertation or must hold the Ph.D., and they must be actively working on some aspect of U.S. foreign relations history. Membership in SHAFR is not required. Within eight months of receiving the award, each successful applicant must file with the SHAFR Business Office a brief report on how the funds were spent. Such reports will be considered for publication in Passport. To be considered for the award, nominations and supporting materials must usually be received by February 1.

    Lawrence Gelfand— Armin Rappaport Fellowship
    The Gelfand-Rappaport Fellowship of $4,000 is intended to defray the costs of dissertation research travel. The fellowship is awarded annually at SHAFR luncheon held during the annual meeting of the American Historical Association. Applicants must have satisfactorily completed all requirements for the doctoral degree except the dissertation and be actively working on some aspect of United States foreign relations history. Membership in SHAFR is not required. Applicants for the Gelfand-Rappaport Fellowship will also be considered for the Bernath Dissertation Grant. Within eight months of receiving the award, each successful applicant must file with the SHAFR Business Office a brief report on how the funds were spent. Such reports will be considered for publication in Passport. The deadline for applications for the grant is usually in October.

    Robert A. and Barbara Divine Graduate Student Travel Fund
    The Divine Fund supports the travel of graduate students who are presenting papers at the annual meetings of SHAFR. When submitting a paper proposal to a SHAFR annual meeting Program Committee, graduate students in need of travel assistance should indicate their interest in financial support from the Divine Fund. The Program Committee will evaluate those applications and allocate the available funds. The total amount of funding available each year varies, as do the specific awards given. (The Program Committee makes decisions about paper proposals strictly on their merits, and without regard to financial needs indicated.) Application procedures and details are publicized in each annual Call For Papers for the annual meeting.

    Visit the webpage SHAFR Awards for more information on all of these awards.

  • Society of Architectural Historians Fellowships (or Write Up)

    Beverly Willis Architecture Foundation Dissertation Fellowship – In a joint program with the Beverly Willis Architecture Foundation, the Society of Architectural Historians is pleased to present a dissertation fellowship that will support preparation of a dissertation focusing on the history (pre-1980) of women’s contributions to the production of architecture, whether as practitioners of design, urbanism, landscape or engineering, as advocates of preservation and planning, or as architectural historians, theorists, teachers and critics. This award is designed to assist during a critical time in the career development of graduate students in architectural history. The fellowship will support travel and research and will recognize important contributions to knowledge both in uncovering new sources and/or in proffering innovative research and framing of issues. The Willis Dissertation Fellowship will be awarded to one doctoral candidate, regardless of gender, nationality, race or ethnicity, from an institution of higher learning that grants Ph.D.s in the history, theory, criticism or preservation of architecture. Restrictions include: dissertation research must focus on women’s contributions to the production of architecture in the United States in the mid-twentieth century; applicants may be enrolled in a Ph.D. program anywhere in the world, but all applications must be submitted in English; candidates must be nominated by their university department; applicants will be expected to have completed all requirements for their doctorate except for their dissertation by June 15th; the award cannot be used toward university tuition and fees; and priority will be given to applicants who plan to publish their dissertation in English within five years of completion. Membership in the Society of Architectural Historians is not required, but strongly recommended.

    The Society also grants more than two dozen fellowships each year to help advanced graduate students, emerging scholars, and senior scholars participate in host of SAH activities including delivering papers at the SAH Annual Meeting and participating in the Study Tours. Many of the fellowships must be newly funded each year. The Rosann S. Berry Fellowship Fund enables an advanced graduate student who is delivering a paper at the SAH annual meeting to defray their meeting costs. The recipient receives a $500 travel stipend and complimentary meeting registration. The Fellowship was named in honor of Rosann Berry, who managed the Society for nearly two decades. The Spiro Kostof Fellowship Fund enables an advanced graduate student who is delivering a paper at the SAH annual meeting to defray their meeting costs. The recipient receives a $500 travel stipend and complimentary meeting registration. The award is named for the renowned historian of architecture and urbanism, Spiro Kostof.

    Visit the webpage Society of Architectural Historians Fellowships to learn more about all of these awards.

  • The Society for the Scientific Study of Sexuality Grants (Any Stage)

    Each year (SSSS) awards two grants of $1,000 each to students who are doing human sexuality research. The purpose of the research can be a master’s thesis or doctoral dissertation, but this is not a requirement. Applicants must be enrolled in a degree-granting program and a member (student) of SSSS. Deadlines For Submission of Applications are January 1st (the Spring award is issued in May) and June 1st of each year. Visit the webpage The Society for the Scientific Study of Sexuality Grants for more information.

  • University of Chicago Library Special Collections Research Fellowships

    The University of Chicago Library awards a small number of short-term research fellowships each year to visiting researchers who live more than 100 miles from Chicago and whose project requires on-site consultation of materials in the Special Collections Research Center. Support for beginning scholars is a priority of the program. Awards will be made based on an evaluation of the research proposal and the applicant’s ability to complete it successfully. Priority will be given to projects that cannot be conducted without on-site access to the original materials and where University of Chicago collections are central to the research. Up to $3,000 of support will be awarded to help cover projected travel, living and research expenses. Applications from women, minorities, and persons with disabilities are encouraged. The deadline for applications is usually in February. Notice of awards will be made in April, for use between July 1st and June 30th. Visit the University of Chicago Library of Special Collections Research Fellowships webpage for more information.

  • William E. Foley Research Fellowship (Missouri)

    The Missouri State Archives offers the William E. Foley Research Fellowship to help support the use of its public records in scholarly research. Any research project that utilizes the holdings of the Missouri State Archives and/or its St. Louis branch to further knowledge of state or national history is eligible for funding. The Archives is the official repository for all state records of historical value. Its collections date from 1770 and include more than 336 million pages of records; 500,000 photographs and prints; 9,000 maps; 65,000 microfilm reels; tens of thousands of state publications; and an important collection of audiotapes, CDs, and videos. Included among these documents are important records concerning: western fur trade; slavery; the Civil War; Frank and Jesse James; military records from the War of 1812 to the start of World War II; European immigration; and modern Missouri politics. Among the larger records series are: governors’ papers; general assembly records; Missouri Supreme Court case files; records and publications from state departments and agencies; and millions of microfilmed county and municipal records.

    Fellowships are intended to defray expenses incurred when visiting the Archives and/or its branch. Awards are based on estimated expenses of up to $2,000. Fellows must complete their research within a year of the award date and are expected to submit a final report explaining the work performed. Applicants should complete an application form and provide a research proposal, curriculum vitae, and list of references usually by March 1st. Selection will be based on the soundness of research; relation to the Archives’ holdings as demonstrated by citation of specific collections; qualifications of the applicant; and potential for impact within the academic community. Notification of awards will be made by March 31st. Fellows are required to include an acknowledgment of the Missouri State Archives William E. Foley Research Fellowship in any work(s) resulting from the research funded. Fellows are also to provide the Archives with a copy of any such work(s). Visit the webpage William E. Foley Research Fellowship for an application form.

  • Winterthur Research Fellowship Program

    Academic, independent, and museum scholars, as well as advanced graduate students, are eligible for short and long-term residential research fellowships at Winterthur. Fellows have conducted research in the areas of material culture, architecture, decorative arts, design, consumer culture, garden and landscape studies, Shaker studies, travel and tourism, the Atlantic World, childhood, sentimental literary culture, and many other areas of social and cultural history. Winterthur’s museum and library collections are rich and diverse, and the Institute not only welcomes applications offering fresh approaches to their resources but deems the suitability of a project to its collections to be the primary consideration for an award. The Winterthur Institute offers McNeil Dissertation Fellowships, which carry a $7,000 per semester stipend, as well as four short-term research fellowships. The application deadline is January 15th; letters of acceptance will be received by April 15th. Visit the webpage Winterthur Research Fellowship Program for more information.

Write-Up Phase

  • Charlotte Newcombe Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship

    The Charlotte W. Newcombe Doctoral Dissertation Fellowships support the final year of work on Ph.D. dissertations dealing with ethical or religious values in fields across the humanities and social sciences. In addition to topics in religious studies or in ethics (philosophical or religious), dissertations appropriate to the Newcombe Fellowship competition might explore the ethical implications of foreign policy, the values influencing political decisions, the moral codes of other cultures, and religious or ethical issues reflected in history or literature. Candidates should apply only if their dissertations have ethical or religious values at their core, and if they can reasonably expect to complete their dissertations during tenure of the award. The application is usually available online September 1. Visit the webpage Charlotte Newcombe Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship for more information.

  • Frederick Douglass Institute for African and African-American Studies Pre-Doctoral Fellowship

    The Predoctoral Fellowship is awarded annually to a graduate student of any university who studies aspects of the African and African-American experience. This fellowship, which carries an annual stipend of $23,000, does not come with any teaching obligation, but will require the Fellow to work with the Institute’s Director in organizing colloquium, lectures, and other events. The principal aim of this award is to expedite the completion of the Fellow’s dissertation. To qualify for this one-year residential fellowship, an applicant will need to have completed and passed the following before the end of the academic year: (1) all required courses; (2) qualifying oral and/or written exams; (3) written at least one chapter of the dissertation (the chapter becomes part of the application package). All Fellows receive office space in the Institute, full access to the University’s facilities, and opportunities to interact and collaborate with scholars of their respective disciplines within the University. Fellows must be in full time residence during the tenure of their awards and are expected to be engaged in scholarly activity on a full-time basis. They must, for example, be available for consultation with students and professional colleagues; make at least two formal presentations based upon their research; and contribute generally to the intellectual discourse on African and African-American Studies. Applications will be accepted between September and January 31. The award will be announced in mid-March. Visit the webpage Frederick Douglass Institute for African and African-American Studies Pre-Doctoral Fellowship for more information.

  • The Getty - Research Grants for Pre- and Postdoctoral Fellowships

    Predoctoral and Postdoctoral Fellowships provide support for emerging scholars to complete work on projects related to the Getty Research Institute’s annual theme. Recipients are in residence at the Getty Research Institute, where they pursue research to complete their dissertations or to expand them for publication. Fellows make use of the Getty collections, join in a weekly meeting devoted to the annual theme, and participate in the intellectual life of the Getty Center. Predoctoral fellows receive a stipend of $20,000 for the nine-month residency period, which lasts from September to June.

    Applications are welcome from scholars of all nationalities who are working in the arts, humanities, or social sciences. Predoctoral fellowship applicants must have advanced to candidacy by the time of the fellowship start date and expect to complete their dissertations during the fellowship period. (Predoctoral fellows who receive their doctorate while in residence automatically become Postdoctoral fellows.) Completed application materials must be received in the Getty Foundation office on or before November 1st. Applicants will be notified of the Research Institute’s decision by spring. Visit the webpage Getty – Research Grants for Pre- and Postdoctoral Fellowships for more information.

  • Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation’s Dissertation Fellowships

    The Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation (HFG) welcomes proposals from any of the natural and social sciences and the humanities that promise to increase understanding of the causes, manifestations, and control of violence, aggression, and dominance. Highest priority is given to research that can increase understanding and amelioration of urgent problems of violence, aggression, and dominance in the modern world. Ten or more dissertation fellowships are awarded each year to individuals who will complete the writing of the dissertation within the award year. These fellowships of $15,000 each are designed to contribute to the support of the doctoral candidate to enable him or her to complete the thesis in a timely manner, and it is only appropriate to apply for support for the final year of Ph.D. work. Applications are evaluated in comparison with each other and not in competition with the postdoctoral research proposals. Applicants may be citizens of any country and studying at colleges or universities in any country.

    Particular questions that interest the foundation concern violence, aggression, and dominance in relation to social change, the socialization of children, intergroup conflict, interstate warfare, crime, family relationships, and investigations of the control of aggression and violence. Research with no useful relevance to understanding and attempting to cope with problems of human violence and aggression will not be supported, nor will proposals to investigate urgent social problems where the foundation cannot be assured that useful, sound research can be done. Priority will also be given to areas and methodologies not receiving adequate attention and support from other funding sources. Applications for dissertation fellowships must be received by February 1st for a decision in June. Visit the webpage Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation’s Dissertation Fellowships for more information.

  • John O’Connor Graduate Scholarship (Irish-American in NY History)

    For Distinguished Graduate Work in the History of the Irish in the New York City Area. Open to graduate students at the masters and doctoral levels. For the last deadline, submissions should have been postmarked June 14th. The John O’Connor Scholarship includes a $1000 award for distinguished graduate work in the form of scholarly unpublished writing covering any aspect of the history of the Irish in the New York City area. Submissions should be primarily historical in character. The winning submission may be published in the journal, New York Irish History. Submissions may be in any standard scholarly format and should be at least 4000 words in length, exclusive of notes and references. Visit the webpage John O’Connor Graduate Scholarship for more information.

  • The Josephine De Kármán Fellowship Trust

    A minimum of ten fellowships, $22,000 for graduate students and $14,000 for undergraduate students, will be awarded for the regular academic year (fall and spring semesters or the equivalent where the quarterly system prevails), paid through the fellowship office of the university in which the recipient is enrolled for study in the United States. Study must be carried out only in the United States and all funds must be expended only within this country. DeKarman fellowships are open to students in any discipline, including international students, who are currently enrolled in a university or college located within the United States. Only candidates for the PhD who will defend their dissertations by June and undergraduates entering their senior year are eligible for consideration. Postdoctoral and masters degree students are not eligible for consideration. Special consideration will be given to applicants in the Humanities. Application requests must be received usually no later than December 31st. Visit the webpage Josephine De Kármán Fellowship Trust for more information.

  • The Louisville Institute’s Dissertation Fellowship (North American Christianity)

    The Louisville Institute’s Dissertation Fellowship program is designed to support the final year Ph.D. or Th.D. dissertation writing for students engaged in research pertaining to North American Christianity, especially projects related to Christian faith and life, religious institutions, and pastoral leadership. Applicants must be candidates for the Ph.D. or Th.D. degree who have fulfilled all pre-dissertation requirements, including approval of the dissertation proposal, by January 15th of the award year and expect to complete the dissertation by the end of the following academic year. The Fellowships are intended to support the final year of dissertation writing. Eligible proposals should promise a significant contribution to the study of American religion. Preference will be given to proposals that attempt to describe more fully how the Christian faith is actually lived by contemporary persons and to bring the resources of the Christian faith into closer relation to their daily lives, to help us understand more adequately the institutional reconfiguration of American religion, or to explore the nature and challenge of pastoral leadership, with special attention to the conditions of contemporary Christian ministry in North America and the character of pastoral excellence. Proposals on certain other issues of importance to the churches are also welcome. Proposed projects may employ a variety of methodological perspectives, including, but not limited to, history, ethics, the social sciences, biblical studies, and historical, systematic, and practical theology. The Louisville Institute is interested in funding projects that contribute in significant ways to our understanding of contemporary religious communities. Consequently, very few dissertation projects funded in recent years have dealt with American religion prior to the mid-nineteenth century. Dissertation Fellowships will provide a stipend of $18,000 for twelve months beginning in September. Fellowships are not renewable. All tuition, medical insurance, and required fees are the responsibility of the student. All materials must be postmarked no later than January 15th each year. Visit the webpage The Louisville Institute’s Dissertation Fellowship for more information.

  • Mellon/ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowships

    These fellowships are to assist graduate students in the humanities and related social sciences in the last year of Ph.D. dissertation writing. This program aims to encourage timely completion of the Ph.D. Applicants must be prepared to complete their dissertations within the period of their fellowship tenure or shortly thereafter. ACLS will award 65 Fellowships in this competition for a one-year term beginning between June and September for the academic year. The Fellowship tenure may be carried out in residence at the Fellow’s home institution, abroad, or at another appropriate site for the research. The total award of up to $33,000 includes a stipend plus additional funds for university fees and research support. These Fellowships may not be held concurrently with any other major fellowship or grant. The application deadline is usually in mid-November; notifications will be sent in late March. Visit the webpage Mellon/ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellowships for more information.

  • Miller Center Fellowships (U.S. Politics and Foreign Relations)

    Miller Center Fellowships in American Politics, Foreign Policy and World Politics – The Miller Center Fellowship program is a competitive program for individuals completing their dissertations on American politics, foreign policy and world politics, or the impact of global affairs on the United States. The program provides up to eight $20,000 grants to support one year of research and writing. Along with the fellowship grant, the Miller Center assists the fellow in choosing a senior scholar as fellowship “mentor” who will make suggestions on the literature in which the fellow should frame the project, read the fellow’s work, and give general advice on research. The Miller Center encourages applicants from a broad range of disciplines, including, but not limited to, history, political science, policy studies, law, political economy, and sociology. Applicants will be judged on their scholarly quality and on their potential to shed new light upon contemporary developments in American Politics, Foreign Policy, or World Politics.

    Wilson Carey McWilliams Fellowship – The McWilliams Fellowship supports a graduate student in political science or history whose dissertation combines the special blend of Political Theory and American Politics that characterized the late Wilson Carey McWilliams’s extraordinary scholarship. The applicant must be a Ph.D. candidate who is expecting to complete his or her dissertation by the conclusion of the fellowship year. The McWilliams fellow will participate in the regular Miller Center Fellowship program, and will also be paired with a fellowship “mentor.” Residence is strongly encouraged but is not required. All fellows are expected to participate in and contribute to the intellectual discourse at the Center. These conferences will provide a forum for presenting research and findings to the scholarly community at the Miller Center and the University of Virginia.

    Visit the webpage Miller Center Fellowships to learn more information, including application procedures, for both fellowship opportunities.

  • The Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations (SHAFR) Awards

    Stuart L. Bernath Dissertation Grant – The Bernath Dissertation Grant of $4,000 is intended to help doctoral candidates defray expenses encountered in the writing of their dissertations. The grant is awarded annually at SHAFR luncheon held during the annual meeting of the American Historical Association. Applicants must have satisfactorily completed all requirements for the doctoral degree except the dissertation and be actively working on dissertations dealing with some aspect of U.S. foreign relations history. Membership in SHAFR is not required. All applications and letters must be submitted via e-mail. Applicants for the Bernath Dissertation Grant will also be considered for the Gelfand-Rappaport Fellowship. Within eight months of receiving the award, each successful applicant must file with the SHAFR Business Office a brief report on how the funds were spent. Such reports will be considered for publication in Passport. The deadline for applications is usually October 15th.

    Dissertation Completion Fellowship – SHAFR will make two, year-long awards, in the amount of $20,000 each, to support the writing and completion of the doctoral dissertation. These highly competitive fellowships will support the most promising doctoral candidates in the final phase of completing their dissertations. Applicants should be candidates for the PhD in a humanities or social science doctoral program (most likely history), must have been admitted to candidacy, and must be at the writing stage, with all substantial research completed by the time of the award. Applicants should be working on a topic in the field of U.S. foreign relations history or international history, broadly defined, and must be current members of SHAFR. Because successful applicants are expected to finish writing the dissertation during the tenure of the fellowship, they should not engage in teaching opportunities or extensive paid work, except at the discretion of the Fellowship Committee. At the termination of the award period, recipients must provide a one page (250-word) report to the SHAFR Council on the use of the fellowship, to be considered for publication in Passport, the society newsletter.

    Visit the webpage SHAFR Awards for more information on all of these awards.

  • The Spencer Foundation Dissertation Fellowships (Education)

    The Dissertation Fellowship Program seeks to encourage a new generation of scholars from a wide range of disciplines and professional fields to undertake research relevant to the improvement of education. These $25,000 fellowships support individuals whose dissertations show potential for bringing fresh and constructive perspectives to the history, theory, or practice of formal or informal education anywhere in the world. Although the dissertation topic must concern education, graduate study may be in any academic discipline or professional field. Applicants need not be citizens of the United States; however, they must be candidates for the doctoral degree at a graduate school within the United States. These fellowships are not intended to finance data collection or the completion of doctoral coursework, but rather to support the final analysis of the research topic and the writing of the dissertation. For this reason, all applicants must document that they will have completed all pre-dissertation requirements by June 1st and must provide a clear and specific plan for completing the dissertation within a one or two-year time frame. Fellows may not accept employment other than as described in the application, nor may they accept other awards providing duplicate benefits without the written permission of the Spencer Foundation. Completed applications must be submitted electronically usually in November. Awards will be announced in. Visit the webpage The Spencer Foundation Dissertation Fellowships for more information.

  • The Erskine A. Peters Dissertation Year Fellowship at the University of Notre Dame

    The Erskine A. Peters Dissertation Year Fellowship has two overall goals, to enable outstanding African American doctoral candidates at the ABD level to devote their full energies to the completion of the dissertation, and to provide opportunities for African American scholars to experience life at the University of Notre Dame, a major Catholic research institution.

    The fellowship period extends from August to May and carries a stipend of $30,000 plus a $2,000 research budget.

    The University also provides each fellow with a home department, a faculty mentor in the fellow’s specialization area, office space with use of a personal computer, health insurance, and forum discussions on professional development.

    The University of Notre Dame is an equal opportunity employer with a strong commitment to nurturing a culturally diverse faculty and student body.

    Interested candidates for the academic year should refer to the Erskine Peters Fellowship Web site at http://africana.nd.edu/erskine/ and follow the online application instructions. Please check the Web site for application deadlines.

  • Arnold L. Mitchem Dissertation Fellowship

    This award is designed to increase the presence of currently underrepresented racial and cultural groups in the U.S. professoriate by supporting doctoral candidates as they complete the final academic requirement, the dissertation. The deadline to apply is usually in January. Visit the Arnold L. Mitchem Dissertation Fellowship webpage for additional information.

Presidential Libraries

  • Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt Institute Research Grants

    The Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt Institute supports a program of small grants-in-aid, not to exceed $2,500, in support of research on the “Roosevelt years” or clearly related subjects. Grants are awarded once annually each spring. The deadline for grant submissions is January 30th; award announcements will be made by March 30th. Funds are awarded for the sole purpose of helping to defray living, travel, and related expenses incurred while conducting research at the Roosevelt Library. The grants program is particularly designed to encourage younger scholars to expand our knowledge and understanding of the Roosevelt period and to give support for research in the Roosevelt years to scholars from the emerging democracies and the Third World. Visit the webpage Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt Institute Research Grants for more information.

  • Gerald R. Ford Foundation

    Two grant programs are available to support research in the holdings of the Gerald R. Ford Library. These holdings focus on Federal policies, U.S. foreign relations, and national politics in the 1960s and 1970s. There are earlier and later materials depending upon your topic.

    Research Travel Grants – The Gerald R. Ford Foundation awards grants of up to $2,000 each in support of research in the holdings of the Gerald R. Ford Library. A grant defrays travel, living, and photocopy expenses of a research trip to the Ford Library. The grants only cover travel within North America. Awards are made twice yearly. Application deadlines (postmark deadlines) are March 15th and September 15th. You may submit applications at any time, and those received too late for one round will automatically be considered in the next. The Grants Coordinator will notify grant recipients about six to eight weeks after the deadline. Grants must support research to be conducted after the awards are announced and will not be awarded retroactively for research already conducted. The Library staff presents the grant check when the recipient arrives to begin research. Visit the webpage Research Travel Grants for more information.

    The Gerald R. Ford Scholar Award (Dissertation Award) in Honor of Robert Teeter – This award gives $5,000 to one individual to support dissertation research on an aspect of the U.S. political process during the latter part of the twentieth century. Applicants must have completed all requirements for the Ph.D. program (coursework and examinations) by the application deadline, except for the dissertation. The Gerald R. Ford Scholar will be required to conduct at least a portion of his or her research at the Gerald R. Ford Library, and, if appropriate, will be encouraged to make full use of the Robert M. Teeter Papers. The Scholar must agree to submit a brief report on the work done under the award no later than six months after receipt of the award and present a copy of the resulting dissertation to the Gerald R. Ford Library when it is completed and accepted. Awards are made each spring. The application postmark deadline is usually May 1. Visit the webpage The Gerald R. Ford Scholar Award (Dissertation Award) in Honor of Robert Teeter for more information.

  • Hoover Presidential Library Association Travel Grants

    The Herbert Hoover Presidential Library Association is a nonprofit support group for the Hoover Presidential Library-Museum and Hoover National Historic Site in West Branch. The Association has funded a travel grant program for twenty-one years, awarding over $440,000 in grants. The program, funded entirely through contributions from private individuals, corporations, and foundations, is specifically intended to promote the study of subjects of interest and concern to Herbert Hoover, Lou Henry Hoover, their associates, and other public figures as reflected in the Library’s collections. It is the applicant’s responsibility to contact the archival staff to determine if Library holdings are pertinent to the applicant’s research. An independent committee of distinguished scholars from Iowa colleges and universities evaluates the research proposals. All funds awarded shall be expended for travel and research expenses related to the use of the holdings of the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library. In recent years, awards have ranged from $500 to $1,500 per applicant. For more information, contact the Hoover Presidential Library Association, P.O. Box 696, West Branch, IA 52358; E-mail: info@hooverassociation.org; Telephone: 800/828-0475; Fax: 319/643-2391. Or visit the webpage Hoover Presidential Library Association Travel Grants.

  • Thomas Jefferson Foundation

    Since 1995, the Thomas Jefferson Foundation has hosted over 220 scholars through a program of residential fellowships and travel grants at the Robert H. Smith International Center for Jefferson Studies. Fellowships and grants are open to all scholars working on Jefferson projects and are awarded on a competitive basis. Foreign nationals are particularly encouraged to apply. Residential accommodation may be available on a limited basis.

    Short-term Fellowships – These are awarded for periods of one, two, three or four months to doctoral candidates and postdoctoral scholars from any country working on Jefferson-related projects. At least one fellowship will be reserved for related research topics in African-American History and in archaeology for fellows using the Digital Archaeological Archive of Comparative Slavery. Fellows are expected to be in residence at the Robert H. Smith International Center for Jefferson Studies, where they will have access to Monticello’s expert staff and research holdings at the Jefferson Library as well as those of the University of Virginia. During their residencies, fellows are expected to deliver an informal 45 minute talk on their projects. The short-term fellowship awards carry a stipend of $2,000 per month plus pre-approved travel costs for scholars from the United States and Canada. The International Fellowship awards include a stipend for $3,000 per month plus pre-approved travel costs. Residential accommodation may be available on a limited basis. Awards are made twice yearly; application deadlines are April 1st and November 1st.

    Travel Grants – Travel grants are available on a limited basis for scholars and teachers wishing to make short-term visits to Monticello to pursue research or educational projects related to Jefferson. Applicants should submit a succinct description of the research project (500 words), a one paragraph summary of the project, and a résumé. Two references should be sent directly to the Center at the address below. Awards are made twice yearly; application deadlines are April 1st and November 1st.

  • Lyndon B. Johnson Presidential Library and Museum

    The Lyndon Baines Johnson Foundation strongly recommends that applicants contact the library for information concerning materials available on the proposed research topic prior to submitting a grant-in-aid proposal. Grants normally range in size from $500 to $2,000. In addition, the foundation awards a “one time only” grant of $75.00 for photocopying purposes to graduate students enrolled within a 50-mile radius of Austin. Application forms are available on our web site or by request to the Supervisory Archivist.

    Limited numbers of grants-in-aid of research are awarded twice a year.

    Deadlines for applications are March 15th and September 15th of each year.

    Grants are awarded for the sole purpose of helping to defray living, travel, and related expenses incurred while conducting research at the library.

    http://www.lbjlibrary.org/page/foundation/initiatives/moody-research-grant/

  • John Fitzgerald Kennedy Library Fellowships and Grants

    The John F. Kennedy Library Foundation offers four fellowships and two sets of travel grants for scholars and students to use the archival, manuscript, and audiovisual holdings of the Library. Only one grant or fellowship application per person can be submitted in a given year. Each application will be evaluated for support in all appropriate areas. Only complete applications will be considered. Those received after a deadline will be considered in the next cycle. Visit the website John F. Kennedy Library Foundation Website or email Kennedy.Fellowships@nara.gov for more information.

    • Marjorie Kovler Fellowship – One per year. Current stipend of up to $2,500. Preference is given to research in the area of foreign intelligence and the presidency, or a related topic. Application deadline: March 15th. Award announced: April 20th.
    • Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr. Fellowship – Current stipend of up to $5,000. Preference in this fellowship is given to applicants specializing in Latin American or Western Hemisphere history or policy studies during the Kennedy Administration or the period from the Roosevelt through the Kennedy presidencies. Application deadline: August 1th5. Award announced: October 20th.
    • Abba P. Schwartz Fellowship – One per year. Current stipend of up to $3,100. Preference in this fellowship is given to research on immigration, naturalization, or refugee policy. Application deadline: March 15th. Award announced: April 20th.
      Theodore C. Sorensen Fellowship—One per year. Current stipend of up to $3,600. Preference in this fellowship is given to research on domestic policy, political journalism, polling, or press relations. Application deadline: March 15th. Award announced: April 20th.
    • Kennedy Research Grants – Fifteen to twenty per year. Range from $500 to $2,500. These can be on any topic relating to the Kennedy period or requiring use of the holdings. Preference is given to Ph.D. dissertation research, research in recently opened or relatively unused collections and the preparation of recent dissertations for publication, but all proposals are welcome. Application deadlines: March 15 for spring grants, August 15th for fall grants. Awards announced: April 20th and October 20th.
    • Ernest Hemingway Research Grants – Range from $200 to $1,000. These are awarded to scholars requiring the use of the Hemingway Collection. Preference goes to dissertation research by Ph.D. candidates and research in recently opened or relatively unused portions of the collection. Yet all proposals are welcome. Application deadline: November 1st. Awards announced: December 15th. Applications received after one deadline will be held for consideration in the next cycle.
  • The Truman Library

    Truman Library Research Grants – Grants of up to $2,500 are awarded biannually and are intended to enable graduate students, post-doctoral scholars and other researchers to come to the Harry S. Truman Library for one to three weeks to use its collections. Awards are to offset expenses incurred for this purpose only. Graduate students and post-doctoral scholars are particularly encouraged to apply, but applications from others engaged in advanced research will also be considered. Preference will be given to projects that have application to enduring public policy and foreign policy issues and that have a high probability of being published or publicly disseminated in some other way. The potential contribution of a project to an applicant’s development as a scholar will also be considered. An individual may receive no more than two Research Grants in a five-year period. Deadlines are April 1st and October 1st. The Committee will notify applicants in writing of its decision approximately six weeks after these dates.

    Dissertation Year Fellowships – Grants of $16,000 will be given to support graduate students working on some aspect of the life and career of Harry S. Truman or of the public and foreign policy issues that were prominent during the Truman years. One or two dissertation year fellowships will normally be awarded each year. Applicants should have substantially completed their research and be prepared to devote full time to writing their dissertation. Preference will be given to projects based on extensive research at the Truman Library. There is no requirement that applicants conduct further research at the Truman Library. The application deadline is February 1st. The Committee will notify applicants in writing of its decision within approximately four weeks after the deadline date.

    Visit the webpage The Truman Library for more information on both these awards.