University of Wisconsin–Madison

Undergraduate Fellowships, Prizes, and Awards

Every academic year, the Department of History awards nearly $20,000 to our undergraduates in order to fund student research projects, recognize superior writing achievements, and acknowledge outstanding students. History majors at any stage are eligible and should strongly consider applying. Scholarships look great on resumes and can even lead to new opportunities. Applications for all the awards offered by the Department of History open at the beginning of each spring semester. Awardees are announced during the last several weeks of the spring semester. Below you will find more information about the prizes, scholarships, and fellowships offered by the Department of History as well as lists of past winners.

  • William F. Allen Prize

    ($200) for historical essays of term-paper size and scope, no more than one of which may be by an undergraduate non-major.

    Recipients of the William F. Allen prize:

    • 2015-16 – Calla Buttke, “A Tale of Two Comrades: Cultural Exchange and Relations between North Korea and East Germany”(Faculty: Charles Kim); Anna Piecuch, “Legal actions of the Shanghai Municipal Police against indecency as an effect of public pressure: 1920-1939” (Faculty: Joe Dennis); Claire Steffen, “The White Man’s Burden: British Oppression during the Decolonization of Kenya”(Faculty: Daniel Ussishkin)
    • 2014-15 – Kelsey Burnham, “Poor People’s Corporation Co-operatives: Black Female Empowerment and the Black Power Movement” (Faculty: Will Jones); Luke Cimino, “Alaska: A Journey to the Land of the Midnight Sun” (Faculty: Daegan Miller); Ashley Tiffin, “Top Secret: The United States’ Cover-Up of Japanese Crimes against Humanity” (Faculty: Fran Hirsch)
    • 2013-14 – Megan Ness, “Citizens, Metics, and Nothoi: Social Status in the aftermath of Pericles; citizenship law as seen through Euripides Medea” (Faculty: Claire Taylor); Erin Zess, “Mobilization for the Production of Penicillin” (Faculty: John Hall); Shao Deng, “Mary Magdalene: The Abandoned Apostle” (Faculty: Leonora Neville)
    • 2012-13 -Amanda Benter, “The CPUSA and the NEgro Question in Theory and Practice, as Evidenced by the Writings of James S. Allen” (Faculty Tony Michels); Dana Peterson, “Spanish Lower Clergy in the Napoleonic Peninsular Campaign: The Real Power behind Guerrilla Warfare” (Faculty: Suzanne Desan); Crescentia Stegner-Freitag, “He Burned Alive, Like Heracles of Long Ago: Noxii as Unwilling Actors” (Faculty: Marc Kleijwegt)
    • 2011-12 – James Duncan, “No Place for Art: The Di Tella and the Auto-Destruction of the Argentine Avant-Garde” (Faculty: Cindy I-Fen Cheng); John McCarthy, “After Gandhi: A Study of Indians in South Africa” (Faculty: Sana Aiyar); Macy Salzberger, “Maria Montessori vs. The United States” (Faculty: Adam Nelson)
    • 2010-11 – Amanda Benter, “Race Relations and Reactions: The Story of the National Conference for New Politics” (Faculty: Camille Guérin-Gonzales); Paul Covaleski, “Analyzing The Hebrew Chronicles of the First Crusade: What They Say, What They Miss, and What They Teach Us”(Faculty: Maureen Mazzaoui); Eric Grant, “Unleashing the Bugs” (Faculty: Nan Enstad)
    • 2009-10 – Megan Bennett, “Democracy Through Education: The United Federation of Teachers and the Civil Rights Movement” (Faculty: William Jones); Kelly Fox, “Tactical and Social Consequences of the Tet Offensive” (Faculty: Alfred McCoy); Ryan Panzer, “How Night Baseball Brightened America During the Great Depression” (Faculty: John Cooper)
    • 2008-09 – Megan Christoph, “Language and Violence: Strategies of the Corsican Autonomy Movement” (Faculty: Laird Boswell); Mary Van Eerden, “The Right to Vote: Women’s Suffrage in Wisconsin, 1909-1919” (Faculty: John Sharpless); Sarah Yungin Reis, “Propaganda Campaigns and Women Workers During the 1940s: Case Study of Allis-Chalmers Workers in Milwaukee” (Faculty: Camille Guérin-Gonzales)
    • 2007-08 – Adam Sitte, “Military Women of the Vietcong” (Faculty: Alfred McCoy); John Vanek, “Augustus and the People of Rome” (Faculty: Marc Kleijwegt); Sarah Reis, “World War II Voluntary Censorship: A Study of Local Wisconsin Newspapers” (Faculty: James Baughman)
    • 2006-07 – Joel Feingold, “Usury in the Early Modern Imagination” (Faculty: Johann Sommerville); Jonathan Manheim, “The Problem Across the Ocean: Interdependency in Boston’s Politics and News Media During the French Revolution” (Faculty:Suzanne Desan); Amanda Fischer, “The Delta Ministry: A New Take on the Civil Rights Movement” (Faculty: William Jones)
    • 2005-06 – Carolyn Averill, “Aggiornamento: New Solutions for a New World. St. Paul’s University Catholic Center and Changes in the Second Vatican Council during the 1960s.” (Faculty: Diane Lindstrom); Tricia Beckmann, “Transforming Greenbush: Urban Renewal in Madison.” (Prof. Colleen Dunlavy); Kelsey Vidaillet, “Violations of Freedom of the Press in Cuba, 1952-69.” (Faculty: Steve Stern)
  • Baensch Prize

    ($500) for best essay on Wisconsin history. Projects considered need not deal with Wisconsin exclusively, but the subject must clearly center on the history of the territory and/or state.

    Recipients of the Baench Prize:

    • 2015-16 – Mia Sato, “In Our Image: How We’ve Built Our Old Third Ward” (Faculty: Bill Cronon)
    • 2014-15 – Sam Jagodzinski, “The Only Constant is Change: A History of Richard Ira Bong Recreation Area”
    • 2013-14 – Emily Nelson, “Ginseng’s Wisconsin Roots: The Growth of an Industry”
    • 2012-13 – Colin Higgins, “From Forest to Field: Nature, the State, and the New Deal in Rural Wisconsin” (Instructor: Athan Biss)
    • 2011-12 – Kristen Schumacher, “We Have Just Begun to Fight: Radical Labor, Cold War Politics, and the 1952 United Electrical Workers Strike at Marathon Electric” (Faculty: Cindy I-Fen Cheng)
    • 2010-11 – Jack Garigliano, “A Question of Authority: Class Consciousness and Scientific Expertise in Wisconsin Agriculture, 1848-1890” ( Faculty: John Sharpless)
    • 2009-10 – Adam Breihan, “Triumphant Insurgency: Meyer Adelman and the Emergence of Wisconsin SWOC” (Faculty: William Jones)
    • 2008-09 – Mary Van Eerden, “The Right to Vote: Women’s Suffrage in Wisconsin, 1900-1919” (Faculty: John Sharpless)
    • 2007-08 – Ann Babe, “The Wisconsin Idea: Origins and Development, 1870-1920” (Faculty: John Sharpless)
    • 2006-07 – Anna-Lisa Dahlgren, “The Bennett Law: Hoard’s Fight for English Language Education” (Faculty: John Sharpless)
    • 2005-06 – Rebecca Wolfson, “The Lost City: From Pavement to Oak.” (Faculty: William Cronon)
  • Andrew Bergman Prize

    (One $1250 award and up to two $750 awards) for the best undergraduate paper written for a history course, based on quality of writing and research, with special attention to clarity and accessibility of writing. This does not need to be a term paper.

    Recipients of the Andrew Bergman Prize:

    • 2015-16 – Alexander Brauer, “Life on the margin: Jews and African-Americans at the University of Wisconsin (1920-1970)” ($1250) (Faculty: Tony Michels); Cody Dunn, “When My Brother Fell: Gay Men, Manhood, and HIV/AIDS” ($750) (Faculty: Susan Johnson)
    • 2014-15 – Curt Strek, “Bowling Lanes and Assembly Lines: Bowling and Economic Development in the 21st Century Milwaukee” ($1000) (Faculty: Sean Dinces); Recipient: John Wendt, “The Second Way of War: Genteel Honor, Martial Glory, and Frustration in the Antebellum Officer Corps along the American Frontier” ($1000) (Faculty: John Hall)
    • 2013-14 – Colin Higgins, ($1250) “Dilemmas of Global Health: Scientific Knowledge and the Politics of Malaria Control in East Africa (1918-1950)” (Faculty: Neil Kodesh) ; Isaac Lee ($750) “America’s Napoleon: The Rhetorical Construction of Napoleon Bonaparte” (Faculty: Suzanne Desan)
    • 2012-13 – Paul Abu-Taleb, ($1250) “The Decisive Elements: The Impact of American Military Strategy on the Civilian Populace of Vietnam” (Faculty: John Hall); Haley Kerkhoff, ($750) “The Perfect Mold: Tupperware Home Parties and the Strategic Recruitment and Training of its ‘Ideal’ Dealers” (Faculty: Nan Enstad)
    • 2011-12 – Aubrey Lauersdorf, ($1250) “’For we are the owners of this land, and it is ours’: Traditional Female Influence in the Great League of Peace and Power and Changing Role of Iroquois Women in the Era of Colonization” (Faculty: John Hall); Alexis Brown, ($750) “Rhetoric and Representation in the 1895 Atlanta Cotton Exposition and Paris Exhibition of 1900” (Faculty: Jennifer Ratner-Rosenhagen)
    • 2010-11 – Konrad Krebs, ($1250) “MP3 Madness and Suing for Sound” (Faculty: Nan Enstad); Paul Abu-Taleb, ($750) “Children of Doctrine: Counterinsurgency and Noncombatant Violence in Vietnam”(Faculty: John Hall)
    • 2009-10 – Lindsay Miller ($1250), “Contributions of the Postal Service to Victory in the American Revolution” (Faculty: Jean Lee) – Paul Axel ($750), “The Evil You Know: How China’s Nuclear Ambitions Changed the Cold War and the World” (Faculty: Jeremi Suri)
    • 2008-09 – Angela Manderfeld ($1250), “Working in Wisconsin: The Postal Worker Experience, 1940s-1980s” (Faculty: Camille Guérin-Gonzales); Danielle Dorr-Niro ($750), “Use It Up-Wear It Out-Make It Do! The Role of Rationing in Promoting the American Food Industry During WWII” (Faculty: Nan Enstad)
    • 2007-08 – Theodora Narus ($1000), “Urban Renewal in Madison, WI: The Uprooting & Disenchantment of the Poor from 1950 to 1979” (Faculty: John Sharpless); Marissa Floyd ($500), “The Compatibility of Christianity & Socialism in the Context of the Kress Controversy of 1905 in Milwaukee” (Faculty: Tony Michels)
    • 2006-07 – Margaret Hilliard ($1000), “Autobiography, History, and the Problem of Memory” – (Faculty: Rudy Koshar); Kurt Kastenholz ($500), “Toward Reunification: How the Liberal Democratic Party Used the Japanese Supreme Court to Break Down the Separation of Religion and State”- (Faculty: Sarah Thal)
    • 2005-06 – David van der Linden ($1,000), “The Bitter and the Sweet: Debating Coffee and Imagining Empire in Great Britain, 1650-1700.” (Faculty: Suzanne Desan); Justin King ($500), “The Challenge to Partnership: Economics, Domestic Politics, and Evolving Alliance Relationships, 1971-74.”(Faculty: Jeremi Suri)
  • Curti Prize

    ($200) for the best historical essay of term-paper size and scope, written by an undergraduate non-major.

    Recipients of the Curti Prize:

    • 2015-16 – Sara King, “Shipmate or Shipwreck? An Analysis of Piratical
      Cooperation in the Late 17th to Early 18th Century Caribbean” (Faculty: Francisco Scarano)
    • 2014-15 – Sedate Kohler, “From Studying Botany to Studying Break-Making” (Faculty: Adam Nelson)
    • 2013-14 – Julia Jacobson, “Initiative or Co-opt: True Advocate or in the Right Place at the Right Time” (Faculty: Sana Aiyar)
    • 2012-13 – Kathryn Lundstorm, “Military Policy and Social Change: DADT and the Consequences of Conservative Timing” (Faculty: John Hall)
    • 2010-11 – Michael Felknor, “A Most Powerful Motive: Jews as an Economic Bloc in Sixteenth- and Seventeenth- Century Europe” (Faculty: David Sorkin)
    • 2009-10 – Molly McCreary, “The Anti-War Movement: A Coalition of Many” (Faculty: Alfred McCoy)
    • 2007-08 – Alec Luhn, “The Moon Hoax: Interpreting Falsehood in the Penny Press” (Journalism major) (Faculty: James Baughman)
  • Fred Harvey Harrington Prize

    ($500) for the best undergraduate thesis by a history major.

    Recipients of the Fred Harrington Prize:

    • 2015-16 – John Rizner, “Supermen on the Silver Screen: Nietzschean thought and postwar memory in Stanley Kubrick’s unmade ‘Napoleon’” (Faculty: Suzanne Desan)
    • 2014-15 – Megan Ness, “Children at Work: Childhood Labor in the Ancient Greek World”(Faculty: Claire Taylor)
    • 2012-13 – Anna Chotzen, “Beyond Bounds: Morocco’s Rif War and the Limits of International Law” (Faculty: Al McCoy)
    • 2011-12 – Susan Burns, “Reflecting Tragedy: A Comparison of Public Sites of Memory in Vietnam and the United States” (Faculty: Al McCoy)
    • 2010-11 – Samuel Finesurrey, “Rebuilding American Compliance: The Legacy of American Dominance that Enabled US Support of the 2002 Coup in Venezuela” (Faculty: Alfred McCoy); Jeffrey Eversman, (Honorable Mention), “Germany’s ‘Political Power Faction’: Tirpitz, the Second Navy Law, and the Genesis of an Anti-British Fleet” (Faculty: Jeremi Suri)
    • 2009-10 – Madeleine Dungy, “French Farm Unions and the Political and Ideological Foundations of the Common Agricultural Policy” (Faculty: Laird Boswell)
    • 2008-09 – William Thomson, “The Making of the Writ of Liberty: Habeas Corpus 1200-1628” (Faculty: Johann Sommerville); Staci Duros (Honorable Mention), “Unnatural Parents and Parent-Child Relationships in Ancient Rome” (Faculty: Marc Kleijwegt)
    • 2007-08 – Jesse Zarley, “Settling the Mapuche Question: Concessionary Colonization in Chile, 1900-1912” (Faculty: Florencia Mallon); Honorable Mention for Harrington Prize – Carolyn Arena, “The Hat Act of 1732: The Emergence of American Manufacture in Atlantic Markets” (Faculty: John Sharpless); Justin King, “Partners and Rivals: Political Economy and American Diplomacy, 1969-1974” (Faculty: Jeremi Suri); Alex Leites, “Myth and Restoration in the Axial Age” (Faculty: Marc Kleijwegt)
    • 2006-07 – Isabel Esterman, “Ativisms of Authoritarian Rule: The Persistence of Human Rights Abuse in the Post-Marcos Philippines.” (Faculty: Alfred McCoy); Honorable Mention: Patrick Kelly, “Of Pawns and Players: U.S.-British Politics vis-à-vis Jewish Refugees, 1945-1948.” – (Faculty: Thomas Archdeacon)
    • 2005-06 – Daniel Deacon, “The Art of Law. Artificial Reason and Equity in Seventeenth Century English Legal Theory.” (Faculty: Johann Sommerville); Honorable Mention: Carolyn Averill, “From Remembrance to Conscience: A Study of the Goals of the US Holocaust Memorial Museum” (Faculty: Rudy Koshar); Jason Rozumalski, “Vegetable Politick: Enlightenment and English Rural Life” (Faculty: Jean Lee)
  • Paul J. Schrag Prize

    ($200) for best undergraduate essay in German-Jewish history.

    Recipients of the Paul J. Schrag Prize:

    • 2015-16 – Joseph Camp, “Despite Hitler: The Political Radicalization of the Weimar Civil Service, 1919 – 1933: (Faculty: Rudy Koshar)
    • 2014-15 – Shao Deng, “Heideggerian Philosophy and Nazism: From the
      Weimar Republic to the Third Reich” (Faculty: Rudy Koshar)
    • 2012-13 – Dylan Osborne, “Never forget: Eyewitness Testimony from Auschwitz” (Faculty: Rudy Koshar)
    • 2010-11 – Ede Bundity, “From Horthy to Rákosi: Political Anti-Semitism in Hungary under Fascism and Communism” (Faculty: David Sorkin)
    • 2009-10 – Hillary Smith, “Unsung Heroes” (Faculty: Laura Weinstein)
    • 2006-07 – Patrick Kelly, “The Politics of Tragedy: Anglo-American Foreign Policy and the Jewish Refugee, 1945-1948 – (Faculty: Laird Boswell & Thomas Archdeacon)

Research Fellowships and Scholarships

Applications need to be submitted online, via Scholarships@UW-Madison. To apply for any of the History Department’s scholarships or research fellowships, visit Scholarships@UW-Madison. Click the “Visit My Scholarships” button and log in using your NetID. You can use your Scholarships@UW-Madison profile to find and apply for History Department awards as well as other external scholarships and prizes you qualify for. Click the “Find Scholarships Applications” button to locate all scholarships you are eligible for. Under the “Eligible Applications” page, locate the name of the scholarship or fellowship you are interested in applying for, and add this application to your profile. If you have any questions, please email, Isaac Lee.

  • William K. Fitch Scholarship

    This scholarship provides a $5,000 grant towards tuition. Both out-of-state and in-state students may apply. Applicants will be considered on the basis of a combination of financial need and academic/intellectual merit (financial need will be determined by the Office of Financial Aid). One Fitch Scholarship will be awarded annually.

    Preference will be given to History Majors with a concentration in U.S. History and to History Majors with other concentrations who have completed coursework that offers comparative & transnational perspectives on U.S. History.

    Recipients of the William K. Fitch Scholarship:

    • 2015-16 – Thomas Rademacher
    • 2014-15 – Khalid Abdl-Haleem
    • 2013-14 – Steven Hoffman
    • 2012-13 – Joseph Fitzgibbon
    • 2012-11 – Meredith Keller
    • 2010-11 – Emily Lilburn
    • 2009-10 – Emily Monske
  • Davis / Gerstein Undergraduate Research Award

    Thanks to generous funding provided by Susan E. Davis and Miles J. Gerstein, the Department offers undergraduate awards to students who propose to undertake an in-depth research project under the close supervision of a History Department faculty member. Successful applicants will receive $2,500 to help defray research costs such as supplies and travel expenses or pay for living expenses so that they have time to conduct research in the UW Libraries and craft their papers.

    Students applying for the Davis/Gerstein will need to prepare the following materials to submit online via CSA:

    1. Detailed description of the research project (no more than five double-spaced pages).
    2. Letter of recommendation from the faculty mentor who will supervise the proposed research project. Recommendation should include a brief budget statement.

    Recipients of the Davis / Gerstein Undergraduate Research Award:

    • 2015-16 -Samuel Gee, “Desacralizing Psychology: Constructing Disciplines in the Early Psychology of Religion” (Faculty Advisor: Jennifer Ratner-Rosenhagen); Samuel Hurwitz, “The Unappreciated Women of Négritude” (Faculty Advisor: Laird Boswell); Michael Moran, “The Wausau Group: A Study of the Role of Local Economic Elites in Community Development from 1880-1929” (Faculty Advisor: John Sharpless)
    • 2014-15 – Andrew Bartsch, “Changes in the Life and Attitude of Non-Elite Natives in Britain During and After the Roman Invasion” (Faculty Advisor: Marc Kleijwegt); Riley Sexton, “Guatemalan 1981-1982: Human Rights Violations in a Cold War Context” (Faculty Advisor: Florencia Mallon)
    • 2013-14 – Kelsey Mullane, The Individual’s Impact on the Enforcement of Capital Punishment Statutes in Seventeenth and Eighteenth Century Connecticut (Faculty: Charles Cohen)
    • 2012-13 – Liyao Lu, The U.S. Role in Taiwanese Democratic Transition in the Chiang Chiang-Kou Era (1978 to 1988)
    • 2011-12 – Meghan Knapp, “Seythian Irish Planting Sarmation Poland in Eastern Europe: An Analysis of English Travel Accounts and Authors on Poland, 1604-1772, and the Effect of Irish/Polish Ehnicity” Faculty: Johann Sommerville); Bryce Luttenegger, “Sovereignty, Europe and the World: The British and their relationship with the rest of Europe” (Faculty: Daniel Ussishkin)
    • 2010-11 – Kathryn Dreps, “The Civil Rights Movement and Place-Memory in Milwaukee” (Faculty: Nan Enstad); James Duncan, “The Di Tella Institute and the Suffocation of the Middle: Popular Culture and Counterculture in Buenos Aires, 1966-1976” ( Faculty: Cindy I-Fen Cheng)
    • 2009-10 – Sean Crocker, “America’s Troubled Use of Air Power in the Irregular Warfare Environment of Vietnam” (Faculty Supervisor: John Hall); Maura Kudronowicz, “The Goddess Isis and the Appeal of Suffering in the Greco-Roman World” (Faculty Supervisor: Marc Kleijwegt)
    • 2008-09 – Alex Truong, “Ragtime and the Tin Pan Alley: From Jelly Roll Morton to Al Jolson Mammy” (Faculty Supervisor: Nan Enstad)Kevin Vrevich, “Federalist Death Nail? A reanalysis of the Demise of the Federalist Party” (Faculty Supervisor: Jean Lee)
    • 2007-08 – Nick Gonzales, “The Making and Unmaking of Modern Europe: The Rise and fall of Great Powers Through Military Interventions” (Faculty supervisors: Jeremi Suri); Staci Duros, “Unnatural Parents: Parent-Child Relationships in the Roman World” (Faculty supervisor: Professor Marc Kleijwegt)
  • Kaplan Family Fellowships

    Thanks to the generosity of our alumnus Harold Kaplan, the Department of History is proud to offer the Kaplan Family Fellowship in History. Note: This fellowship is not currently being offered.

    The Kaplan Family Fellowships provides support for undergraduate students who wish to undertake a research project (a senior thesis, for example) in close collaboration with a faculty supervisor. Scholarships are also available for students and faculty who propose a “research internship” that helps students acquire critical research skills. Successful applicants will receive $1,000 in support that they can use for travel, research expenses and supplies.

    Recipients of the Kaplan Family Fellowships in History: 

    • 2012-13 – Corina Cheung, “Fog of Invisibility”: Taiwan, South Africa and South African Chinese (Faculty: Judd Kinzley)
    • 2011-12 – Amanda Armstrong, “José Carlos Mariátegui: A study on his influence across time and space in 20th century Latin America” (Faculty: Florencia Mallon)
    • 2010-11 – Jason Pickart, “Differences in British and Mughal Rule over India: 1717-1857” (Faculty: Sana Aiyar)
    • 2009-10 – Catherine Diao, “Management and Regulation of the Dutch East India Company in 17th Century Netherlands” (Faculty Supervisor: Lee Wandel)
    • 2008-09 – Mark Otto, “Friend or Foe: The Dissemination and Application of Machiavelli in Early Stuart England” ( Faculty Supervisor: Johann Sommerville); Abigael Nachtsheim, “The Lure of Fascism: French Intellectuals, Politicians, and the Rejection of Democracy, 1930-1945” (Faculty Supervisor: Laird Boswell)
    • 2007-08 – Joshua Hartman, “Evaluating the Ideal: The Roman Influence on Chivalric Ethos.) (Faculty supervisor: Professor Marc Kleijwegt); Andrew Myszewski, “Responsible Riches: A History of Corporate Social Responsibility in the United States” (Faculty Supervisor: Colleen Dunlavy)
    • 2006-07 – Isabel Esterman “Atavisms of Authoritarian Rule: A Case of Executive-Legislative Conflict over Human Rights in the Philippines” (Faculty supervisor: Professor Alfred McCoy)
      Thomas Kivi “Montaigne, Descartes, and the Malleable Augustine” (Faculty supervisor: Professor Lee Palmer Wandel); Steven Weber “America’s Outcast: Senator Robert M. LaFollette, 1917-1919” (Faculty supervisor: Professor John Cooper)
    • 2005-06 – Eli Persky, “Fourth Branch or Rogue Elephant: US Military Contacting After the Cold War.” Faculty supervisor: Prof. John Sharpless.; Liana Prescott, “To Create a New Japan: ‘National Essence’ and the Critique of Modernity, 1880-1937.” Faculty supervisor: Prof. Louise Young.
    • 2004-05 – Benjamin Dahl, “Help or Hindrance: Violence in the Student Movement of 1960s West Germany.” Faculty supervisor: Prof. Rudy Koshar; Shauna Fitzmahan, “The Foundation of a Human Rights Movement: Ukrainian Dissent in the 1960s.” Faculty supervisor: Prof. Jeremi Suri
  • Mosse Distinguished Research and Service Fellowship

    Thanks to the financial support of the Mosse Program, the Department of History is pleased to offer the Mosse Distinguished Research and Service Fellowship.

    The Mosse Fellowship ($2,000) is designed to reward majors who have demonstrated excellence in historical research and undertaken significant community service at the campus, local, national or international level. The award funds students who need financial support to undertake significant community service oriented learning.

    Recipients of the Mosse Distinguished Research and Service Fellowship:

    • 2014-15 – Megan Ness, Danielle Wais
    • 2012-11 – Kathryn Dreps, “Following Their Footsteps: A Walking Tour of Milwaukee’s Civil Rights Movement”; Gina Slesar, “UW-Madison’s 1962 Gay Purge and Early LGBT Activism in Wisconsin”
    • 2009-10 – Yongqing Douglas Yang, “UWisLit: University of Wisconsin Literacy Initiative” (Faculty Supervisor: Jeremi Suri)
    • 2008-09 – Ned Meerdink “Local Organizations and Development in Humanitarian Crisis Zones: A Case Study of the Uvira Multimedia Center in Uvira/South Kivu, Congo.” (Faculty supervisor: Neil Kodesh);
    • 2007-08 – Susan Levy “US-Latin American Solidarity: from Sanctuary to Fair Trade.” (Faculty supervisors: Professors Francine Hirsch and Florencia Mallon)
  • Russian History Awards

    The Department offers the Alice D. Mortenson Undergraduate Scholarship in Russian History. We are grateful to our alumna, Alice Mortenson, for her generous support. The Mortenson scholarships ($3,000) will be awarded to up to three students interested in Russian history, and at least one of the scholarships will be reserved for a student majoring in a discipline other than history.

    Recipients of the Alice D. Mortenson Research Award:

    • 2008-09 – Alec Luhn, “Media Censorship in Putin’s Russia” (Faculty supervisor: James Baughman and David McDonald); Thomas Van Rooy, “Russia’s Energy Power as a Political Tool” (Faculty supervisor: Galina Lapina and Jolanda Vanderwal Taylor); Katherine Tondrowski, “Soviet Propaganda for Children: Raising the Perfect Soviet” (Faculty supervisor: David McDonald and Francine Hirsch); Casey Bischel, “Identity Crisis: The Russian Orthodox Revival in Eastern European Politics” (Faculty supervisor: Matthew Walker and Ben Jens)
    • 2006-07 – Michael D. Albrecht, “Spectre of Sedition” – Supervising Professor: David McDonald
  • Margaret E. Smith-Esther Butt History Scholarship

    The Department awards one Margaret E. Smith-Esther Butt History Scholarship annually. The award is designed for outstanding History majors.

    Recipients of the Margaret E. Smith-Esther Butt History Scholarship:

    • 2015-16 – Alexander Brauer (Faculty Sponsor: Pablo Gomez)
    • 2014-15 – Megan Ness (Faculty: Claire Taylor)
    • 2013-14 – Laura Luo (Faculty: John Sharpless)
    • 2012-13 – Macy Salzberger
    • 2011-12 – Sarah M. Smith (Faculty: William Reese)
    • 2010-11 – Anna Chotzen (Faculty: Sana Aiyar)
    • 2009-10 – Arthur Zarate (Faculty Sponsor: Alfred McCoy)
    • 2008-09 – Alec Luhn (Faculty: David McDonald)
    • 2007-08 – Anna Williams ($1,500 award) (Faculty: Suzanne Desan); Jesse Zarley ($ 1,000 award) (Faculty: Florencia Mallon)
    • 2006-07 – Alexander Leites; Anna Williams
  • The Orson S. Morse History Scholarship

    The Orson S. Morse History Scholarship is given annually to an outstanding History major. Mr. Morse received his degree in History from the College of Letters & Science in 1932 and established this bequest to support undergraduate history education.

    Recipients of The Orson S. Morse History Scholarship:

    • 2015-16 – Joseph Camp (Faculty Sponsor: Kathryn Ciancia)
    • 2014-15 – Edward Knudsen (Faculty: Al McCoy)
    • 2013-14 – Gretchen Miron (Faculty: Mark Kleijwegt)
    • 2012-13 – Ryan Gesme
    • 2011-12 – Kirsten Moran (Faculty: Christy Clark-Pujara)
    • 2010-11 – Ryan Panzer (Faculty: Rudy Koshar)
    • 2009-10 – John Layde (Faculty: Johann Sommerville)
    • 2008-09 – Tenzin Tsetan (Faculty: Suzanne Desan)
    • 2007-08 – Madeleine Dungy ($1,000 award) (Faculty: Laird Boswell)
    • 2006-07 – Liana Prescott
  • The Willard L. Huson Scholarship

    The Willard L. Huson Scholarship is awarded annually to a deserving student majoring in History at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The successful applicant will receive $250 during the fall semester and $250 in the spring semester. Only freshmen, sophomores, and juniors are eligible for this scholarship.

    Recipients of The Willard L. Huson Scholarship:

    • 2015-16 – Islam Aly
    • 2014-15 – Kelly Fisher
    • 2013-14 – Ryan Gesme
    • 2012-13 – Gretchen Miron
    • 2011-12 – Macy Salzberger
    • 2009-10 – Ryan Panzer
    • 2008-09 – Irene Berkowitz
    • 2007-08 – Carolyn Arena
    • 2006-07 – Joshua Hartman
  • Steven A. and Barbara S. Jaffe History Scholarship

    Beginning in 2016, the Department will award one Steven A. and Barbara S. Jaffe Scholarship annually. The award is designed for outstanding History majors who are not Wisconsin residents (for tuition purposes).

    Recipients of the Steven A. and Barbara S. Jaffe History Scholarship:

    • 2015-16 – Natalie Tupper (Faculty Sponsor: David McDonald)
  • University Scholarships and Prizes

    The Letters and Science Undergraduate Scholarships Office is now accepting scholarship applications from sophomore, junior and senior students. Scholarships are awarded upon demonstration of a combination of the following criteria: academic achievement, creative accomplishment, force of character, financial need, diversity of background, and community service. Scholarships awarded at the junior or senior level tend to have an emphasis on academic achievement and merit.

    • We also urge our students to apply for the Wisconsin Hilldale Undergraduate/Faculty Research Awards that offer up to $4,000 of support for the student and $1,000 for the faculty sponsor. The deadline for applications is usually early in the spring semester.
    • Wisconsin Idea Undergraduate Fellowships support undergraduates who work in partnership with a faculty/instructional staff member and a community organization to meet an identified community need. Fellowship recipients earn 3 credits while gaining hands-on experience and receive a stipend of up to $3000 for individuals or $5000 for a group.
    • Returning Adult Student Scholarships: These are scholarships awarded to newly admitted or currently enrolled UW-Madsion degree students. Some scholarships require a significant interruption in study, or have specific age and gender stipulations. Applications are accepted from December 1st to March 1st.
    • Single Parent Scholarships: These scholarships are available to newly admitted or currently enrolled UW-Madison degree students who are single parents; and scholarships provide $1,000-$2,000 in funding support per academic year. Applications are accepted from December 1st to March 1st.
    • Campus-wide Scholarship: The college also offers other awards and prizes that can be used for research in history.
    • Finally, the honors program also offers research and travel grants as well as prizes for honors students.
  • Other Prizes and Awards
    • The Wisconsin Labor History Society offers the Frank Zeidler Academic Award ($500) for the best undergraduate research paper about Wisconsin labor and working class history. For details and deadlines see Wisconsin Labor History Society
    • The Gilder Lehrman History Scholars Program, based in New York City, is a competitive summer scholarship program for college sophomores and juniors.
    • The annual Iwanter Prize provides an unrestricted $2,000 award to one graduating senior who, through a senior thesis and general academic distinction, demonstrates outstanding humanities-based scholarship of a broad and interdisciplinary nature. The award is made possible by a gift to the UW Foundation by Sidney E. Iwanter, an alumnus of the College of Letters & Science (BA History, 1971). Applications must be received by the Center for the Humanities by 5:00 pm on May 1st. For more information and eligibility requirements, please see the following document: Iwanter Prize for Outstanding Interdisciplinary Scholarship
    • The Institute for Humane Studies is dedicated to helping bright undergraduate students interested in individual liberty to pursue their intellectual interests. Each year, Humane Studies Fellowships of up to $12,000 are awarded to outstanding undergraduate students exploring the principles underlying a free society. Fellowships are open to students who will be enrolled during the academic year. The application and all supporting materials must be submitted online. For more information about this fellowship, please visit Humane Studies Fellowships.