University of Wisconsin–Madison

Biography

My general research interests lie in the history of race and gender in twentieth-century Britain. My dissertation project explores the often-productive tension that lay between the imagined moderation of the ‘universal’ right-bearing individual and the ‘excess’ ascribed to women and people of color in the post-war period. Focusing on five debates that gripped the nation between 1950 and 2000, I argue that generations of Britons grappled with this problem of ‘excessive’ selfhood, and thereby contested and ultimately transformed the meaning of liberal individualism, a concept that had sat at the center of Britain’s domestic and imperial self-understanding for centuries. My project draws new connections between the politics of gender, race and selfhood, reveals the unexpectedly wide-ranging intellectual significance of the Women’s Liberation Movement, and offers a new look at the transition from post-war social democracy to the contemporary neoliberal state.

Education

M.A., University of Oxford
B.A., University of York

Field

  • European History

MA Title

  • ‘From Greenham to Girl Power: Attitudes to Feminism in Britain, 1983-1997’

Working Dissertation Title

  • “In Excess: Women, Race and the Problem of Individualism in Post-War Britain”

Selected Publications

Awards

  • 2018 Lerner Fellowship, History Department, UW Madison
  • 2017 Minna Grotophorst Willis Fellowship, History Department, UW Madison
  • 2016 Theodore J. Oseau Fellowship, History Department, UW Madison
  • 2016 Voted Teaching Assistant of the Year, Phi Alpha Theta
  • 2015 Award for Early Excellence in Teaching, History Department, UW Madison
  • 2013 Chancellor’s Fellowship, UW Madison

Professional Affiliation

  • American Historical Association
  • North American Conference on British Studies
  • Berkshire Conference of Women Historians

Courses Taught as TA

  • History 120 – Europe since 1789
  • History 124 – Britain since 1668
  • History 357 – The Second World War
  • History 392 – Women and Gender in Modern Europe

Courses Taught as Instructor

  • History 227: Race and National Identity in the US and UK since 1945