I am interested in the global context of Poland's interwar history, especially in the newly resurrected state’s interactions with Africa. I explore the ways in which statesmen constructed Poland’s identity in a Wilsonian era of empires, nation-states, mandates, and colonies. Among others, I examine the mobilization of the Polish-American community to support their home country, the establishment of Polish settlements in Africa and Latin America, Poland’s attempts to be granted colonial stewardships by the League of Nations, and the imagining of a shared experience of imperial subjugation between Poles and Africans. I believe that understanding the tensions between Poland’s colonial and anti-colonial orientations illuminates the country’s position in the interwar world.
Field:
  • Modern European History

M.A. Title:

  • "The Polish Mission in Liberia, 1934-1938: Constructing a ‘Third Way’ of Colonialism"

Working Dissertation Title:

  • "Interwar Poland in Africa: Between Colonialism and Wilsonianism, 1918-1939"

Education:

  • Bachelor of Arts (New York University '14)

Selected Publications:

  • “The Polish Mission to Liberia, 1934-1938: Constructing Poland’s Colonial Identity.” The Historical Journal, March 2017, 1–26. doi:10.1017/S0018246X16000534.

Awards:

  • Central Slavic Conference (graduate representative)
  • Józef Piłsudski Institute of America (volunteer)

Courses Taught as TA:

  • History 120 - Europe and the Modern World (Fall 2016)
  • History 419 - History of Soviet Russia (Spring 2017)

Grad

Piotr Puchalski

ppuchalski@wisc.edu

Advisor:
Kathryn Ciancia