I am interested in the global context of Poland's interwar history, especially in the colonial ambitions of the newly-resurrected state. I explore the ways in which Polish statesmen constructed colonial discourse while defining Polish identity, enticing the Polish diaspora to support the home country, and seizing opportunities to acquire influence in Africa and Latin America. At the same time, I also examine the contemporaneous Polish attempts to build friendly relations with Africans and other colonized peoples on the basis of a shared experience of imperial subjugation. I believe that the tensions between these two not-so-separate efforts help to understand Poland's position in the interwar world.


Field:
  • Modern European History

M.A. Title:

  • "The Polish Mission in Liberia, 1934-1938: Constructing a ‘Third Way’ of Colonialism"

Working Dissertation Title:

  • "Poland in Colonial Africa: Ideological Obligation, Political Escape, Economic Expansion"

Education:

  • Bachelor of Arts (New York University '14)

Selected Publications:

  • "The Polish Mission to Liberia, 1934-1938: Constructing Poland's Colonial Identity," The Historical Journal, forthcoming, 2017.

Awards:

  • Central Slavic Conference (graduate representative)
  • Józef Piłsudski Institute of America (volunteer)

Courses Taught as TA:

  • History 120 - Europe and the Modern World (Fall 2016)

Grad

Piotr Puchalski

ppuchalski@wisc.edu

Advisor:
Kathryn Ciancia