My work explores the role of unique sites of colonial contact in shaping ideologies of gender and empire. My dissertation examines the formation of an imperial relationship between France and Lebanon in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, investigating how a range of encounters between writers and travelers, industrialists and workers, activists and administrators, and everyday French and Lebanese men and women informed the transition from informal protectorate to formal colonial regime.


Field:
  • Modern European, France, Gender and Colonialism

MA Title:

  • "Women's Honor and the 'Black Shame': Envisioning Colored Frenchmen and Respectable Comportment in the Occupied Rhineland"

Working Dissertation Title:

  • "A Mandate to Protect: Imperial Encounters and Affective Ideologies between France and Lebanon, 1900-1930"

Education:

  • BA: Swarthmore College

Selected Publications:

  • “Women’s Honour and the Black Shame: Coloured Frenchmen and Respectable Comportment in the Post-World War I Occupied Rhineland,” German History Vol. 33, No. 4 (Dec. 2015), pp. 546-569.

Awards:

  • Dana-Allen Dissertation Fellowship, Institute for Research in the Humanities, University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Mellon International Dissertation Research Fellowship, Social Science Research Council
  • Fulbright Doctoral Research Grant, France
  • Foreign Language and Area Studies Fellowship, Arabic

Professional Affiliations:

  • American Historical Association
  • Society for French Historical Studies
  • Western Society for French History
  • Middle East Studies Association
  • French Colonial Historical Society

Courses Taught as TA:

  • History 120 - Modern Europe and the World
  • History 392 - Women and Gender in Modern Europe

Grad

John Boonstra

boonstra@wisc.edu

Advisors:
Mary Louise Roberts and Laird Boswell